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Full text of "Radio TV Mirror (Jul-Dec 1953)"

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Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 




AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The UBRARY of CONGRESS 



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Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/nnopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



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FEB 1 2 1954 
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N. Y. radio, TV listings 



Joan Alexander 
and daughter Jane 



„ti00^lrW^ ■ 






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SPECIAL 
FEATURES 




Dave Garroway 
Today's Bachelor 




Patricia Wheel 
Doctor's Wife 




fERYONE LOVES LUCY! , 

elusive story by Hedda Hopper 

mm GODFREY'S FATEFUL HOURS 

le story of one man's fighting courage 





Dennis James 
Home for a Lifetime 






-\, '• 



^^Vmf /l/lim/e f 








leaves hair 




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Ihe Clarkes had heen married eight years 
So had the Deanes. But, of late, 
Jim Clarke seemed to deliherately forget 
their anniversary. But not Joe Deane . . . 
he always rememhered. Naturally, 
Ethel Clarke was hurt. She woidd have 
heen shocked to learn what lay hehind 
her hushand's indifference. It's a 
matter* that no woman can 
afford to he careless about. 



LiSTERiNE Antiseptic stops ^halitosis 
(bad breath) instantly and keeps it 
stopped usually for hours on end. This 
superior deodorant effect is due to 
Listerine's germ-killina action. 




No chlorophyll kills odor bacteria 
like this . . . instantly 

You see, Listerine Antiseptic kills mil- 
lions of germs, including germs that 
cause the most common type of bad 
breath . . . the kind that begins when 
germs start the fermentation of proteins 
which are always present in the mouth. 
And, research, shows that your breath 
stays sweeter longer depending upon the 
degree to which you reduce germs in the 
mouth. Brushing your teeth doesn't give 
you Listerine's antiseptic protection. 
Chlorophyll or chewing gums do not kill 
germs. Listerine does. 

Clinically proved four times 
better than tooth paste 

That is why independent research re- 
ported Listerine Antiseptic averaged at 



USTERINE STOPS BAD BREATH 

4 times better than chlorophyll or tooth paste 



least four times more effective in reduc- 
ing breath odors than three leading chlo- 
rophyll products and two leading 
tooth pastes. 

No matter what else you do, use 
Listerine Antiseptic when you want to 
be extra-careful that your breath does 
not offend. Rinse the mouth with it 
night and morning, and before any date 
where you want to be at your best. 
Lambert Pharmacal Company Division 
of The Lambert Company, St. Louis 6, 
Missouri. 




Every week 

2 diflFerent shows, radio & television — 

"THE ADVENTURES OF OXZIE & HARRIET" 

See your paper for times and stations 



LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC. ..the most widely used antiseptic in the world 



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'sure IS FOGBOUND, EDDIE! 

BEITERCHECKINATYOUR- 

DENTIST'S, mate! 




wow! SO KATE'S HUNG a] 
BAD-BREATH TAG ON ME, 
HAS SHE? HIT THE DECK, 
MR. DENTIST! HERE I COME!! 




JUST ONE BRUSHING WITH C0L6ATE DENTAL ' 

■ CREAM REMOVES UP TO 85% OF THE BACTERIATHAT 

CAUSE BAD BREATH! SCIENTIFIC TESTS PROVE THAT 

■ COLGATE'S INSTANTLY STOPS BAD BREATH IN 7 OUT ' 

OF 10 CASES THAT ORIGINATE IN THE MOUTH ! 






Just one brushing with Colgate's removes up to 
85% of decay-causing bacteria! And if you really 
want to prevent decay, be sure to follow the 
best home method known— the Colgate way of 
brushing teeth right after eating! | 



LATER— Thanks to Colgate Dental Cream 




Now! ONE Brushing With 

COLGATE 
DENTAL CREAM 

Removes Up To 85% Of Decay 
and Odor-Causing Bacteria! 



Onl; The Colgate Way Does All Three ! 
CLEANS YOUR BREATH while it 

CLEANS YOUR TEETH and 
STOPS MOST TOOTH DECAY! 




JULY, 1953 



RADIO-TV MIRROR 



Contents 



VOL. 40. NO, 2 



Keystone Edition 



Ann Higginbotham, Editor 
Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 
Betty Freedman, Editorial Assistant 
Maryanne Crofton, Editorial Assistant 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 
Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 
Joan Clarke, Art Assistant 
Betty Mills, West Coast Editor 



Fred R. Sammis. Editor-in-Chief 



people on the air 

What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 4 

The U. S. Marine Band 12 

Who's Who in Radio — Just Plain Bill and Family (Arthur Hughes, 

Toni Darnay, James Meighan) 16 

Day-Time in Cincinnati (Doris Day) 24 

Everyone Loves Lucy ! ( Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz) ....by Hedda Hopper 31 

Her Heart Holds a Song (Peggy Taylor) by Lilla Anderson 34 

Robert Q. Lewis — Bespectacled Miracle Man by Philip Chapman 36 

Grand Ole Opry: Red Foley's a Family Man 38 

Minnie Pearl's Happily Married by Gladys Hall 40 

Ken Murray — Home-time Is a Great-time by Maxine Arnold 42 

Life's Hard-won Victories Are Hers (Joan Lorring)....by Mary Temple 44 
Vacations Are More Fun Than Anything (Joan Alexander) 

by Marie Haller .50 
The Doctor's Wile — The Shadow ot Another Man's Past Threatens 

Julie and Dan 56 

The Blessed Help of People (Truth Or Consequences)... .by Janet Salem 60 

Today's Bachelor (Dave Garroway) by Chris Kane 62 

The Woman in My House (Janet Scott, Forrest Lewis, Les Tremayne, 

Alice Reinheart, Shirley Mitchell, Billy Idelson, Jeffery Silver and 

others) 64 

Front Page Farrell's Wife (Florence Williams) by Frances Kish 68 

features in full color 

Arthur Godfrey's Fateful Hours by Ira H. Knaster 46 

Wendy Warren's Little Mrs. Innocent (Jean Gillespie). .by Jeanne Sakol 48 

Home for a Lifetime (Dennis James) by Martin Cohen 52 

Laughter's the Word for Link (Art Linkletter) by Dick Pettit 54 

your local station 

He Can Do It Better (KYW) 8 

Watch The Birdie (WWDC) 11 

A Sterling Citizen (WCBS) 22 

The Mystery of Morgan Baker (WEED 26 

inside radio, TV, records 

Information Booth 10 

What's Spinning? by Chris Wilson 14 

Daytime Diary 18 

Inside Radio (program listings) 77 

TV Program Highlights 79 

Cover portrait ot Joan Alexander and daughter Jane by Maxwell Coplan 



GIVES YOU A CLEANER, 
FRESHER MOUTH ALL DAY LONG! 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY )>y Macfadden Publications, Inc., New 

Vc.rk. N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE, ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES nt 

203 Ea.st 42nd Street. New York, N. Y. Editorial Branch 
Oflices: 321 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif., and 
22 1 North La Salle .street, ChicaBO, 111. Harqld A. Wise, 
Chairman of the Board; Irving S. Manheimer, President: 
Kred R. Sammis, Sol Himmelman, Vice Presidents; Meyer 
Dworkln, Secrctai-y and Treasurer. Advertising ofHces also 
in ('htcaKo and Siin Frunclsco. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.50 one year. U. S. and Posses- 
sions. Canada S.'J.OO per year, $5.50 ppr year for all other 
(■ountrlcs. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS; (1 weeks" notico essential. When pos- 
sible, please fniriish slciicil impression address from a re- 
eent issue. A'lrlTisj^ i'h.inj;e.s can be made only if you send us 
vn\n' old as w.Jl as your new address. Write to Kadio-TV 
Mtrrr>r. '2or> Kunt ^and Street, New York 17. N. Y. 
MANUSCRIPTS: All manuscripts will be carefully considered, 

Member of The TRUE 



but publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. It 
is advisable to keep a duplicate copy for your records. Only 
those manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self -addressed 
•■*^tm;n envelopes or with sufficient return postage will be 

FOREIGN editions handled throuRfh Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, 
N. Y. Irving: S. Manheimer, President; Douglas Lockhart, 
Vice President. 

Rc-cntercd as Second Class Matter, Oct. 5, 1951, at the 
Post omco at New York. N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail, P.O. Dept., Ottawa, 
Ont. , Canada. Coijyright 1953 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. 
All rights reserved under International Copyright Convention. 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tion. Todos derechos resei-vados segun La Convencion Pan- 
Americana de Propiedad Literarla y Artistica. Title trademark 
registered in U. S. Patent Oflice. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Co. 
STORY Women's Group 




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Like this "Angelic" hairdo? Note the 
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"Holiday" hairdo for career girls. 
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See how the ends curl gently under for 
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A real compliment collector— the '"Sun Sprite" hairdo! Bobbi pin-curl per- 
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Swing to casual hair styles demands 
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Easy! Just simple pin-curls and Bobbi give this far easier home permanent. 
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WHAT'S NEW 



Ethel and Albert — alias Peg Lynch and Alan Bunce. 



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Met-mezzo Blanche Thebonn guests for Warren Hull. 




M New harmony duo: Bing Crosby and Jimmy Stewart — quite a tea 



m. 



• By JILL WARREN 



NBC is presenting a big TV extrav- 
aganza called Saturday Night 
Revue as the summer replace- 
ment for Your Show Of Shows. It will 
run for thirteen weeks, starring Hoagy 
Carmichael as host and emcee. Hoagy 
will also sing, play piano and perform 
in dramatic sketches on the hour-and- 
a-half program. For the most part, the 
cast will include talent from the stage 
and night clubs, which is fairly new to 
television. Comedian Bob Sargent will 
be featured on the first few shows, also 



ll 



FROM COAST TO COAST 




The three Shriners — Herb, Indy (at piano) and his wife Pixie — form a musical trio at home. 



songstress Helen Halpin, and a different 
name band will be spotlighted each 
week. In addition, there will be filmed 
segments of various novelty and variety 
acts which NBC cameramen have been 
shooting in Europe for the past year. 
All in all, they have about forty hours 
of this type of entertainment "in the 
can" and the producers will pick the 
best of it for Saturday Night Revue. 
The network has assigned two different 
creative crews, two sets of writers, two 
directors, etc., so that the program ideas 



will be bright and fresh — they hope. 

The summer talent list finds singers 
Bob Eberle and Helen O'Connell filling 
in for Perry Como on his CBS televi- 
sion show. Ray Anthony's orchestra 
will supply the music. This will be a 
real reunion for Bob and Helen, who 
both rose to vocal fame a few years ago 
when they were featured with Jimmy 
Dorsey's orchestra. 

On June 11, Teresa Brewer will 
take over for Jane Fromian on U.S.A. 
Canteen, Tuesday and Thursday nights 



over CBS-TV. If the show stays on this 
fall, Jane will probably return to her 
regular spot. 

Ethel And Albert, which has been 
off the air for many, many months, has 
returned to NBC-TV as a regular fea- 
ture on Saturday nights. This is good 
news to longtime fans of this excellent 
domestic comedy series. Peg Lynch, 
who also writes the show, is Ethel, and 
Alan Bunco is Albert. 

For the first time in radio histoiy 
the major (Continued on page 6) 




New Mum with M-3 

Idlls odor bacteria 

stiops ockxr all daylong 



PROOF! 

New Mum with M-3 destroys bac- 
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Pholo (left), fhowt active odor bac- 
teria. Photo (right), after adding new 
Mum, (howf bacteria destroyed ! 
Mum contains M-3, a scientific dis- 
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bacteria . . . doesn't give underarm 
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Amazingly effective protection from under- 
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the jar. Get a jar today and stay nice to be near! 

A Prodi4Ct of Bristol-Myers 



European music festivals will be brought 
to America via CBS radio in a consecu- 
tive series of one-hour-and-a-half weekly 
broadcasts this summer. The program is 
heard on Sundays in the time formerly 
occupied by the New York Philharmonic 
Symphony. Now, through the magic of 
tape recordings, music lovers can hear the 
actual performances of world-renowned 
music festivals of the continent, as well as 
the famous Tanglewood Music Festival in 
Stockbridge, Massachusetts. 

Nancy Kenyon is the new lyrical lady 
on American Music Hall, heard Sunday 
nights on radio over the ABC network. 
She has replaced Joan Wheatley. Nancy, a 
soprano, who has done mostly night club 
work heretofore, looks and sounds a great 
deal like Marguerite Piazza. 

Though the 20th Century-Fox Film 
Corporation has announced its plans to 
release the best of its already-produced 
films to television, it looks as though you 
won't be seeing these big movies in your 
living rooms much before the fall of 1954. 
With all the major studios in Hollywood 
fairly hysterical over the new 3-dimen- 
sional processes, it's practically a sure 
thing that other companies will follow 20th 
Century in releasing their product to tele- 
vision. However, it is also a fairly safe 
probability that it will take almost a year 
to convert the nation's movie theatres to 
3 -dimension projection. 

The major networks are still signing top 
talent for television. ABC has tabbed Ray 
Bolger and Danny Thomas to long-term 
exclusive TV contracts, both of which will 
take effect in the faU. Both Thomas and 
Bolger will star in their own weekly half- 
hour shows, to originate from Hollywood, 
and each of their contracts call for their 
services on ABC Radio as well. 

NBC-TV has inked Celeste Holm for a 
forthcoming series spotlighting her talents 
as actress-singer-comedienne. They have 
also signed actor Tom Ewell to a long deal 
calling for appearances on both radio and 
television. Ewell is currently starring on 
Broadway in the big comedy hit, "The 
Seven Year Itch." 

CBS-TV has formed something called a 
New Program Planning Group, which is 
a panel of creative talent to develop new 
program ideas, and, as the first two mem- 
bers, they have engaged Ronald Alexander 
and Sally Benson. Alexander is the author 
of the New York stage show, "Time Out 
for Ginger," and Miss Benson wrote the 
well-known Junior Miss and Meet Me in 
St. Louis stories, in addition to numerous 



This 'n' That: 

Arthur Godfrey, who has been so 
enthusiastic about the future development 
of MiEimi Beach as a national television 
center, certainly doesn't have any opposi- 
tion from Florida's public officials. Any 
time Arthur wants to go to work for the 
Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, he'll 
undoubtedly be welcomed with open arms. 
Although he will be off the air through 
August, because of his orthopedic opera- 
tion, Godfrey insists that he'll be doing 
much of his broadcasting from the South- 
ern sun center come next winter. 

When Eve Arden and her husband, 
Brooks West, return from Europe this fall, 
they hope to bring back an addition to 
their family. Eve has been planning on 
adopting another baby — she already has 
two adopted girls — and would like nothing 
better than finding a war orphan to take 
into their home. 

Vaughn Monroe annoimced his retire- 
ment from, the orchestra business when he 
played his final band date in May at Ford- 
(Continued on page 21) 




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Looh 



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Philadelphia deejay Jock Pyle, his wife Emilie and their two children, Corol and Toby. 




H 

can do it better 




Jack tries a bunt for his speedoon uemon Toby in iiien living room. 



WHEN Jack Pyle was in the Coast 
Guard, he walked into a radio station 
one day and said, "Those deejay shows 
we hear in the barracks are second 
rate — I coiild do better myself." That was 
the beginning of Jack's career as a disc 
jockey. He is heard daily from 6:30 to 9 
in the morning over Station KYW. 

Bom in Cleveland thirty-three years 
ago. Jack moved East with his family 
and went to school in Washington and 
Baltimore. During his high-school days 
he became a great record hound — Louis 
Armstrong became his all-time favorite. 
After graduation he joined the Coast 
Guard, and it was while stationed in 
Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in 1940, 
that he complained to the brass at Station 
WCNC about their disc men. All during 
his time in service. Jack managed to 
squeeze some radio broadcasting into 
his crowded days as a Guardsman. 

It was also during this time that Jack 
got married. He had met Emilie 
three years before. They now have two 
children — Carol, six, and Toby, four. 
Since Jack is an ardent baseball 
fan, he's justly proud of Toby's pitching 
prowess. Toby's probably the best 
four-year-old southpaw in the game! 
The Phillies are Jack's favorite team, 
and he even arranges his vacation so that 
he can watch them in spring training 
down Florida way. 

He's not the kind of fan who yells, 
"Lemme pitch that ball," though. 
He only tried that routine once, and it 
really paid off. In that case he could 
do it better, and has been doing it 
ever since. 



# 




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It is important that you use a shampoo made for your indi- 
vidual hair condition. There are three Breck Shampoos. One 
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for oily hair. A third Breck Shampoo is for normal hair. 
The next time you buy a shampoo, select the Breck 
Shampoo for your hair condition. A Breck Shampoo cleans 
thoroughly, leaving your hair soft, fragrant and lustrous. 

The Three Breck Shampoos are available at Beauty Shops, Drug Stores, Department Stores, and wherever cosmetics are sold. 



JOHN 
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YORK 



MANUFACTURING 
HICAGO • SAN 



CHEMISTS • SPRINGFIELD j MASSACHUSETTS 
FRANCISCO .• OTTAWA CANADA 





When asked to dinner, should you be — 

I I Sure of the date Q "Foshionab/y" late 

You were positive Mary's mom said this 
Tuesday. ("Dinner ... a few friends.") 
Or did she mean next Tuesday? Double- 
checking would have spared confuddle- 
ment. Saved barging in, a week ahead, to 
find the family re-hashing Sunday's roast! 
Better not be "hazy" about certain other 
"dates", either. Or the kind of sanitary 
protection to choose. Remember, Kotex 
prevents revealing outlines. Those special 
flat pressed ends let you glide through any 
occasion— with a heart as light as helium! 



Which can be a threat to poise? 

I I A callous heart Q •A callused heel 

We're talking about those beat-up loafers she's 
wearing. The soft shoe routine is fine— 'til 
they get too loose; then, being slip-shod can 
cause a callus. Shoes should fit snugly. Pro- 
tects your looks; poise. Of course, a.1 problem 
time, poise and Kotex go together. That safety 
center gives extra protection. And Kotex holds 
its shape; is made to slay soft while you wear it. 



^ 




More women choose KOTEX* 
than all other sanitary napkins 



sr Of 

If he's just an acquaintance — 

n Try siren tactics Q Pay your own fare 

Your friendship's casual. Comes along a bus 
— and suddenly your purse develops lock- 
jaw! A chance meeting doesn't mean he 
must pay your way. Best you pay your 
own. On"tryiiig"days discover"your own" 
absorbency of Kotex. You'll see — (by try- 
ing all 3) — whether Regului', Junior or 
Super is the one for yon. 



T. M, REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



R 
M 

10 




llaVf you tried new Delsey* toilet tissue- the only one that's 
line and firm and soft — like Kleenex* tissues? Kach tissue tears 
olf evenly — no shredding, no waste. And Delsey's double-ply 
for extra strength. Uon't you think your family deserves this 
n(;w, nicer tissue? Ask for Uelsey at your favorite store. If 
Uelsey is not on liaruj, have ihem order it for you. 



Information 
Booth 



The New Luigi 

Dear Editor: 

We re very fond of the man who took 
over as Luigi. Can you give us some in- 
formation about him? 

L. P., Wilmington, Del. 

Vito Scotti, the new Luigi Basco, was 
christened Vito Scozzari thirty-five years 
ago in San Francisco. His father was a 
macaroni manufacturer in Tunis, Africa, 
who died when Vito was an infant, and his 
mother — known in the entertainment world 
as Gina Snatelia — brought him up. Vito 
grew up in the entertainment business, 
touring with his mother and brother all 
over the United States. By the time he 
was twenty-two, Vito had his own mu- 
sical-comedy company, which toured with 
tuneful shows like "Blossom Time," 
"Vagabond King," and "Naughty Mari- 
etta." For a time, Vito's main source of 
income was small comedy roles in the 
movies, but then TV came his way — and 
better parts came with it. Three years ago 
Vito married Irene Lopez, a Spanish clas- 
sical dancer, whom he met in New York. 
The couple live in a small Hollywood 
apartment. 

J. Fred Muggs 

Dear Editor: 

Is it true that J. Fred Muggs, the mon- 
key on the Dave Garroway show. Today, 
is in love? 

F. S., Rochester, N. Y. 

J. Fred, who was a year old not so long 
ago, met a female of his species at a birth- 
day party held for him recently in Chi- 
cago. The girl who captured his heart is 
called Sheba, and J. Fred treated her as 
if she were the late Queen herself. But 
(Continued on page 27) 




Vito Scotti 



Milton Q. Ford and Richord share breakfast. 



watch 
the Birdie 





The Milton Q. Ford family feeding breadwinner Richard (in cage) — 
Jeff, age two, Jeanne, Milt's wife, Milton Q. and Mike, age three. 



RICHARD is the only full-time pai'tner in 
radio who works for peanuts. But partner 
he is— to Milton Q. Ford, Washington, D.C., 
wit. Both are heard on WWDC and seen on 
TV daily. Yes, just like Abbott and Costello, 
Martin and Lewis, Bergen and McCarthy — Ford 
and Richard keep people laughing. Actually, 
it's a team beyond comparison — Richard, he's 
beyond comparison. Richard is a parrot. 

Together for five years now, Milton Q. and 
Richard are so popular they were recently 
made into a funny strip. They are now seen in 
350 newspapers throughout the country. At 
this stage of the game, Richard is more than a 
mere bird to the Ford family. He's a 
breadwinner, and is treated with the respect due 
him by Milt's wife Jeanne and youngsters Jeff 
and Mike. 

Both partners got a shot-in-the-arm two 
years ago when Milt got a new sister-in-law. It 
all happened when Ford's brother Bob Fallon 
married screen star Marie (My Friend Irma) 
Wilson. Milt was best man at their Hollywood 
wedding, and met so many screen stars 
there, that now everytime one of the Hollywood 
set comes to Washington — they appear on 
the Milton Q. Ford Show. 

Milt came to Washington and WWDC from his 
home town of Memphis, Tennessee. He 
entered radio there, after he was graduated from 
the University of Tennessee Law School. He 
had already been admitted to the Bar when he 
decided to switch to radio. 

As for the future — Milton Q. Ford is not an 
ambitious man. He feels that someday Richard 
will be ready to take over, and then Milt can 
sit home and watch the money roll in. Of course, 
he hasn't figured on Richard. The bird has let it 
get around that then he will pay Milt in peanuts. 



11 



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THIS month, the United States 
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its founding — on July 11, to be 
exact. The eighty-one piece band 
has gained world-wide acclaim, and 
is one of the finest aggregations of 
its kind on earth. Organized by an 
Act of Congress, the band is often 
referred to as the "President's 
Own" since it has performed at 
White House functions starting in 
the year 1801 — -at President John 
Adams' New Year's Day reception. 
The Marine Band has another 
anniversary coming up this year. 
1953 marks its twenty-third year on 
radio, and that's quite a birthday, 
because it makes the Marine Band 
the oldest sustaining show on the 
air. Led by Lt. Col. William F. 
Santelmann (his father led the 
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TiHis month's column is going to be de- 
voted to answering mail. If there isn't 
room enough this time around — keep 
watching and reading, and eventually your 
questions will become answers. 

RED BUTTONS 

To L. B.: Yes, Red Buttons has a record- 
ing out. The name's "Strange Things Are 
Happening," and you'd better hurry if you 
don't want to be put on the waiting list 
at your favorite record shop. He is, un- 
doubtedly, the same man you saw when 
you were visiting the CatskUls — and I hate 
to tell you, but you're one of several mil- 
lion who are now discovering that you 
enjoyed Red when. . . 

JULIUS LA ROSA & LU ANN SIMMS 

To J R. (and all you other enthusiasts) : 
You can contact these two people for pic- 
tures and information through the Arthur 
Godfrey Office, Columbia Broadcasting 
System, 485 Madison Ave., New York 22, 
N. Y. We'll keep you informed on their 
new recordings, of course. 

THE MODERNAIRES 

To A. H.: The Modernaires are four boys 
and a girl, and their names are Fran Scott, 
Allan Copeland, Paula Kelly, Johnny Drake 
and Hal Dickinson. In real life, Paula Kelly 
is Mrs. Dickinson. Coral label carries 
them, and their latest is "Wishing You 
Were Here Tonight" and "Lovely Is the 
Evening." 

THE McGUIRE SISTERS 

To B. W.: Arthur Godfrey and you have 
something in common — you both think the 
McGuire Sisters are good. Christine, Phyllis 
and Dorothy got their original break on 
the Kate Smith show. They are from Mid- 
dletown, Ohio, and were mighty popular 
when they joined the staff of WLW in 
Cincinnati. "The musical composer Gordon 
Jenkins befriended them when they ar- 
rived in New York, and Ted Collins put 
them on for eight straight weeks with 
Kate Smith. Godfrey was so impressed 
with them when they appeared on his Tal- 
ent Scouts that he asked them back for 
his Wednesday-evening show as well. They 
have "One, Two, Three, Four" and "Pickin' 
Sweethearts" out under the ' Coral label, 
right at the moment. 

JONI JAMES 

To R. E.: Yes — you may have gone to 
school with Joni James. She, too, attended 
Bowen High School in Chicago, and her 
name was Joan Babbo. She was an honor 
student, sang in the school choir, nnrl 



What's 



By CHRIS WILSON 



worked as a counter -girl in an attempt to 
help support herself. Bright girl, Joni! 

HANK WILLIAMS 

To B. K. (and about ten others who have 
written) : Hank Williams was just thirty 
years old when he died last New Year's 
Day. Sorry, the list of memorial albums 
is just too long to include in this space. 
Hank was only fourteen when he started 
singing over Station WSFA in Montgom- 
ery, Alabama. He worked there luitil five 
years ago, when Grand Ole Opry — out of 
WSM in Nashville — asked Hank and his 
boys to join them. His first recording for 
MGM was in 1947 when he did "Move It 
Over." His last recording was "Kaw-liga," 
which he wrote as well as sang. 




Red Buttons really made a solid 
bid for recording acclaim with 
"Strange Things Are Happening." 



Spinning? 




Civilian Eddie Fisner will be on 
the cover of Radio-TV Mirror for 
August — a complete story inside. 



BILLY ECKSTINE 

To R. L.: Oh me, oh my — I thought 
everyone knew about Billy Eckstine. But 
here goes, since you asked for it. Billy 
was bom in Pittsburgh, attended Arm- 
strong High School in Washington, D. C. 
He did not complete college — he entered 
Howard University and left it after he'd 
won an amateur contest. His greatest rec- 
ord hits are '"Skylark," "Jelly, Jelly," and 
'Stormy Monday Blues" — the last two he 
wrote himself. 

DICK TODD 

To M. B.; The singer on "Daddy's Little 
Girl" is Dick Todd for Decca. Dick is a 
Canadian, having been brought up on a 
farm near Montreal. He's a sportsman at 
heart — once even trained for th Olympics. 
Yes, he has another recording cat — "Some- 
one to Kiss Your Tears Away" and "You're 
More Like Your Mommy Ev'ry Day." 

TONI ARDEN 

To R. D. H.: Toni Arden comes from a 
family of singers, which might answer your 
question about her training. Before he 
passed away, her father, Phillip Ardi- 
zoone, gave Toni training for an operatic 
career. Yes, Toni was Morey Amsterdam's 
"straight girl" on his Gloom Dodgers radio 
show on Station WHN. Her big break came 
when she appeared on Ed Sullivan's Toast 
Of The Town TV show— Columbia Records 
called her the very next day. Toni's only 
twenty-two. You're probably already en- 
joying her latest recordings, "Heart of 
Stone — Heart of Wood" and "There's Al- 
ways My Heart." 



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15 



JUST PLAIN BILL 
and FAMILY 



Arthur Hughes 



R 
M 

16 




ARTHUR Hughes may be his real 
name, but to millions of Amer- 
icans — he's Just Plain Bill 
(Davidson), the lovable barber of 
Hartville. For nineteen years Ar- 
thur has been Bill, and it's difficult, 
even for him, to separate the real 
man from the NBC character. His 
part as a barber has led to one of 
Arthur's chief hobbies — collecting 
barbering equipment. His prize 
possessions are a jewel -encrusted 
razor which once shaved a Medici 
face, and a pair of ancient Greek 
scissors. 

Chicago born, Arthur began his 
career on the stage when he was 
seven. A stage manager, who was 
a family friend, used to take him 
to the theatre to play child parts. 
Arthur's ambition was to become a 
lawyer, however. He acted in or- 
der to make extra money for his 
education. After spending three 
years in the Infantry during World 
War I, Arthur changed his mind, 
and decided to stay in the theatre. 
He has been in many fine Broad- 
way plays, in addition to his radio 
work. 

Like the character he portrays, 
Hughes is a man of simple tastes. 
He has millions of friends — all 
made during his years as Bill — who 
write him for advice. His advice — 
as Arthur Hughes — is to live ac- 
cording to principle and honor, and 
to find happiness in the many little 
things in life. 



Just Plain Bill is heard on NBC, Monday 
through Friday at 5:15 P.M. EDT, for the 
Whitehall Pharmacal Co., makers of Anacin. 





Bill's beloved daughter Nancy is played by 
Bill's beloved wife Toni Darnay. The first 
"Bill" — to unravel the above statement — is 
Just Plain Bill, and the second one is Bill Hoffman, 
Toni Darnay's writer-husband. The HofEmans are 
one of the happiest couples in New York, where 
they live with their two little ones — Toni and 
Darnay. The names were Bill's idea, Tony is 
always quick to say. But Bill Hoffman doesn't 
mind taking the credit — he wanted his children to 
be named after his lovely wife. 

Toni comes from a show-business family on her 
mother's side, and spent most of her early life 
trying to convince her father that she, too, must 
have a theatrical career. She did vaudeville, 
danced in clubs, played summer stock and reper- 
tory — each time to be yanked out of the cast by 
her father. But, after she was eighteen, Toni had 
her own way at last. She went to New York with 
great hopes, but the going was tough. The spaghetti 
got tiresome, and mended stockings were no fun, 
but then Toni got a chance to audition for a radio 
part. She won the part of Evelyn Winters in the 
now-extinct serial, Romance Of Evelyn Winters. 
From there on, it was easy sailing for other roles — 
her part as Nancy, for example. 



Toni Darnay 



KERRY, Nancy's husband on Just Plain Bill, is 
portrayed by James Meighan. Jim thanks 
radio fans for the fact that Kerry is still a 
part of the program's permanent cast. When he 
first appeared in the script, it was intended only 
as a slight complication, but the fans insisted that 
the writers let Nancy marry him — so Kerry's still 
around. 

Jim's been preparing for show business all of 
his life. He studied acting at the Carnegie Institute 
of Technology, acted in stock, and had wonderful 
experience at the famous Provincetown Playhouse 
with such stars as Walter Abel and Wayne Morris. 
On Broadway, Jim played opposite such luminous 
ladies of the theatre as Ethel Barrymore, Helen 
Hayes and Jane Cowl. 

But, in 1929, the crash really hit the theatrical 
business, and Jim considers himself one of the 
lucky actors who found radio. He has stayed with 
it ever since, but lately has been able to limit him- 
self almost exclusively to his two major roles. He 
is Kerry, and also portrays Larry Noble in Back- 
stage Wife. This gives him much more time to 
spend at home with his own wife — Aleece and 
their three children. 




James Meighan 



who's who in Radio 



17 



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DAYTIME 
DIARY 



AVNT JEJVIVy Wherever there are peo- 
ple, there are sure to be complications. A 
long-missing husband, a marriage about to 
fail, a tragic misunderstanding — these sto- 
ries and many others have been told by Aunt 
Jenny recently as she continues to share 
her intimate knowledge of the dramas that 
make Littleton as interesting and absorbing 
as most places are when you know the truth 
about them. M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BACKSTAGE W'IFE Pre-opening wor- 
ries give way to relief as Larry Noble's 
new play achieves success. But the dra- 
matic forces behind the scenes cause new 
troubles for Larry and his wife Mary, 
particularly when actress Dolores Mar- 
tinez is removed from her leading role 
opposite Larry. Will Dolores accept this 
disappointment quietly, or will her re- 
sentment lead to serious consequences for 
the Nobles and their friends? M-F, 4 P.M. 
EDT, NBC. 

nniGHTEit DAY The dam project 
stirs up life in Three Rivers to such an 
extent that forces long concealed far be- 
neath the placid surface are at last ex- 
posed to daylight. It is almost unbelievable 
to the Dennis family that the quiet, dull 
little town they left months before can 
produce all the excitement they have come 
back to — excitement that doesn't stop 
short of murder. How will the Reverend 
Dennis be involved? M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, 
CBS. 

OOCTOWS WIEE Julie and her hus- 
band, Dr. Dan Palmer, are almost stunned 
with happiness when they learn they will 
at last have the child they had almost 
given up hoping for. But there is no such 
thing as perfect happiness. What strange 
twist of fate lies ahead for the young 
Palmers as they lovingly prepare for the 
birth of their baby? What does the future 
hold for this marriage which has been 
almost too happy? M-F, 5:45 P.M. EDT, 
NBC. 

I<'K01%T PACE EAItttELE David Far- 
rell, ace crime reporter for the New York 
Daily Eagle, regards it as his prime job 
to come back from an assignment with the 
story his paper wants. But over the years 



David has trained his sharp eyes, ears and 
instincts to such a pitch that the police 
never have had to file as unsolved any 
case he has worked on. David and his 
wife Sally, working together, have brought 
many criminals to the justice they sought 
to avoid. M-F, 5:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

GVimiSG EIGHT When young Joey 
Roberts enlists, it is from his stepmother 
Meta that he gets un lerstanding rather 
than from his hurt and surprised father. 
But gradually Joe comes to see that Joey's 
turning to Meta is a good thing — that, at 
last, the family feeling he hoped for when 
he married Meta is coming to life. Will 
Meta also be able to help as young Dr. 
Dick Grant, husband of Joe's daughter 
Kathy, faces his own problem? M-F. 1:45 
P.M. EDT. CBS. M-F. 12:45 P.M. EDT, 
CBS-TV. 

niLLTOP HOUSE Julie Paterno. head 
matron of Hilltop House, is inclined by 
both experience and temperament to keep 
a level head in emotional matters. But 
the situation created after Reed Nixon's 
accident is particularly difficult for Julie. 
How far can she go in lifting Reed's de- 
pression and self-accusation without com- 
promising her own future far more than 
she intends? Can she ever really love 
Reed? M-F, 3 P.M. EDT. CBS. 

JUST PLAMN BIMA. Bill Davidson is 
disturbed when his son-in-law, Kerry Don- 
ovan, undertakes to represent Wesley 
Drake in a libel suit against Bill's young 
friend, Dennis Hill. Dennis is also in- 
volved with Teresa Knight, whom Bill 
distrusts despite her apparent forgiveness 
of Dennis after first holding him respon- 
sible for her husband's mental break- 
down. Will Teresa cause a rift between 
Bill and his daughter Nancy? M-F, 5 P.M. 
EDT, NBC. 

MAEE VAX BE BEAUTIFIJE Chichi's 
friends, Douglas and Alice Norman, make 
an important decision when Alice plans 
to stop working with Doug on his neigh- 
borhood newspaper and become a full- 
time liomemaker. It looks at first as 
thougli young Grace Garcine is going to 
be just the helper Doug needs. But Chichi 



senses some straws in the wind — straws 
that point in a strange direction. Just who 
is Gracie Garcine? M-F, 3 P.M., EDT. 
NBC. 

LORE\ZO JOy'ES When Belle Jones 
accompanies her employer, producer Verne 
Massey, to the Toronto tryout of his new 
play, she is at long last brought face to 
face with her husband Lorenzo, for whom 
she has been desperately searching ever 
since his loss of memory separated them. 
But, instead of happiness, tragedy looms 
as Lorenzo, unable to recognize Belle, pro- 
ceeds with his plans for marriage to Gail 
Maddox. M-F, 5:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

3iA PERKIXS When Tom Wells left 
Rushville Center many months ago, Fay 
only half believed he would come back to 
her. And when he did, and the feeling 
between them had apparently steadied 
into something Tom felt he could rely on 
for the rest of his life, she was almost 
more surprised than ecstatic. Was Fay's 
uneasiness premonitory? What will hap- 
pen as a result of Tom's trip to New York 
to get his book published? M-F, 1:15 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

Oltt GAL SUNDAY Despite all Sun- 
day's efforts, she cannot turn the tide of 
evidence that threatens to convict her hus- 
band. Lord Henry Brinthrope, of murder. 
Does Henry's plight really arise from 
Sunday's involvement with Wilma Taylor 
and her husband Paul? Or is it Wilma's 
brother, the crippled Clifford Gates, who 
holds the key to Lord Henry's future in 
his threatening, embittered personality? 
Can Sunday save Henry? M-F, 12:45 P.M. 
EDT. CBS. 

PEPPER YOIJXG'S FAMILY Pepper 
and Linda thought they were making the 
most sensible decision of their marriage 
when they decided to adopt the baby 
whose mother had indicated so firmly 
that she did not want him. But when the 
child's father changes his mind, Pepper 
and Linda find their lives verging on heart- 
break. Even if Jim Dennis' desperate ef- 
fort to reclaim the baby fails, what will 
the shock and strain do to Linda? M-F, 
3:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

PERRY MASON With the death of 
Mark Cesar's chief henchman, Emmet, 
lawyer Perry Mason is certain he is at last 
approaching the center of Cesar's opera- 
tions. Police cooperation makes it easier 
for Perry to follow out his complicated, 
difficult plan to trap Cesar. But what will 
happen to Ruth Davis if Cesar manages 
to elude discovery long enough for his own 
desperate plan to work? Will Perry be 
quick enough? M-F, 2:15 P.M., EDT, 
CBS. 

RIGHT TO HAPPINESS The alien- 
ation between Miles Nelson and his wife 
Carolyn continues despite Carolyn's heart- 
broken efforts to clear away misunder- 
standing. Will she ever succeed as long 
as Annette Thorpe remains in Miles's con- 




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Daytime Diary 



fidence? Will Miles make Carolyn's in- 
terest in the Lockwoods his excuse for a 
rift more serious and far-reaching than 
anything she has so far anticipated? And 
will Annette benefit from this? M-F, 3:45 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

nOAD OF LIFE At last Conrad Over- 
ton may have overreached himself in his 
effort to convict Dr. Jim Brent of the mur- 
der of Gordon Fuller, for the gun planted 
in Jim's car throws suspicion in an unan- 
ticipated direction. Or rather Conrad's 
daughter Sybil has overreached herself, 
for it was Sybil who made the desperate, 
almost suicidal attempt to involve Jim 
beyond extrication. How near is Sybil 
Overton to the mental breaking point? 
M-F, 3:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. M-F, 1 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT As 

Hollywood gown designer Helen Trent 
continues work on Kelsey Spencer's new 
picture, mounting tension arising out of 
Spencer's curious personality continues to 
disturb her. She is relieved when Spencer 
turns his attentions to aspiring actress 
Gladys Larkin, not realizing that Spencer's 
purpose is to arouse her jealousy. What 
part will Kelsey's mysterious housekeeper, 
Mrs. Poindexter, play in Helen's life? M-F, 
12:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

ROSEMARY Over the protests of his 
wife Audrey, Lefty Higgins continues his 
cooperation with Bill Roberts in their ef- 
fort to expose the gambling ring operating 
in Springdale. It is Lefty's proud boast 
that he knows all the angles, but is Aud- 
rey right in fearing that there are a few 
he may not foresee? Will Bill's paper 
get the information it needs to clean up 
the town? Or will the evil truth remain 
out of reach? M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 

SECOND MRS. RVRTON The Bur- 
ton store had been the traditional family 
business for so long that neither Stan 
nor Terry anticipated a change. But Stan 
was happy when events led him to the 
realization of his long-cherished dream to 
run a newspaper. Terry knew this would 
make an important change in their lives, 
but if she could have foreseen the star- 
tling future, would she have encouraged 
Stan as she did? M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

STELLA DALLAS When Arnold King's 
sister-in-law Alida is mysteriously killed, 
Arnold's plan to marry Stella is halted 
and both their lives are plunged into con- 
fusion as they attempt to discover the 
truth behind the tragedy. Knowing Arnold 
must be innocent, Stella persistently seeks 
proof of the vicious plot against him which 
she senses but cannot yet prove. How does 
her beloved daughter Laurel figure in the 
plot? M-F. 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

THiS IS NORA DRAKE In a desper- 
ate eflort to save her own life, young Grace 
Sargent tells Cass Todero that a friend of 



hers holds a sealed list of his criminal 
history, with instructions to open it only if 
something happens to her. Todero imme- 
diately assumes it is Nora Drake who holds 
this weapon against him. Nora, frightened 
by his threats, is prevented from calling 
police only by Grace's hysteria. But how 
can Nora protect herself? M-F, 2:30 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

WENDY WARREN At last the truth 
about Mark is out in the open ... at least 
for those who will admit it. Is psychia- 
trist Dr. Weber going too far when he 
diagnoses Mark as a manic-depressive? 
Or is Wendy being continually misled by 
Mark's periods of apparent mental health 
into believing him on the road to recovery? 
Will she be forced to face the truth when 
things have gone so far that there is no 
turning back? M-F, 12 noon EDT, CBS. 

WHEN A GIRL MARRIES It is some- 
times difficult for Harry and Joan Davis to 
realize that the months of their dreadful 
separation, during which Joan was be- 
lieved dead, are really over. But their re- 
union has not entirely eliminated the 
strange forces working to ruin their lives, 
and the complications that arose while 
they were apart are additional factors that 
cast a threatening shadow over the future 
which should be so bright. M-F, 10:45 
A.M. EDT, ABC. 

WOMAN IN MY HOUSE When Vir- 
ginia Carter married artist Stanley Creigh- 
ton, she knew she was taking on a temper- 
mental life partner, and there have been 
times when she regretted persuading him 
to move to the farm, since it was so alien 
to his previous way of life. But with the 
coming of their child a curious change 
comes over Stan — a fundamental change 
in his whole attitude toward life. How will 
this affect the Carter family? M-F, 4:45 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

YOVNG DR. MALONE It's been up 
and down with the marriage of Mary 
Browne and Ernest Horton ever since Mary 
first decided to take a chance on it. Now 
it seems to Dr. Paul Browne, her father, 
that it has taken a turn for the worse from 
which it may never recover as Mary finds 
she is going to have a baby. Ernest's 
evident bitterness at the added responsi- 
bility which may force him to give up his 
writing is an ominous signpost to the fu- ! 
ture. M-F, 1:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

YOVNG WIDDER BROWN Ellen 
Brown and Dr. Anthony Loring, their re- 
lationship already broken by Anthony's 
inability to prove the long-ago annulment 
of his marriage to Ruth Loring, undergoes 
further strain as the result of the difficul- 
ties of their friends, Norine and Herbert 
Temple. Are Norine and Anthony as close 
as circumstances make them appear? Can 
Ellen maintain her faith in the man she 
has loved for so long? M-F, 4:30 P.M. 
EDT. NBC. 



What's New 
from Coast to Coast 



(Continued from page 6) 
ham University in New York. Vaughn 
says that from now on any performances 
he does in night clubs, theatres or tele- 
vision, will be as a soloist. However, he 
will continue to broadcast his weekly radio 
program, and there are plans in the making 
for him to do a television show from New 
York this fall. 

Songstress Mindy Carson and her hus- 
band, Eddie Joy, are expecting a new little 
joy the first part of August. They are 
hoping for a brother for Jody, their ten- 
month-old daughter. Incidentally, Mindy 
has taken up a hobby which is working 
out very well, in view of the stork's im- 
pending visit. She bought a sewing machine 
and with it came a course of lessons, so 
she's been stitching like mad. She plans to 
return to her television chores shortly 
after the new baby's arrival. 

Frank Sinatra may star in a telepix 
series tentatively titled Blues In The Night. 
This is a dramatic human-interest story 
about a musician which is being done by 
Desilu Productions (Lucille Ball's and 
Desi Arnaz's company), and they are 
hoping to have it on TV screens this fall. 

Anzie Strickland, who is heard as Claire 
on When A Girl Marries, is now also play- 
ing Grace on Life Can Be Beautiful. The 
producers chose her after auditioning many 
well-known radio actresses for the part. 
Although Anzie is thrilled with her new 
assignment, she says she hopes she won't 
get typed doing these unsympathetic girls 
on daytime serials. 

Congratulations are in order for Don 
McNeill. On June 23, the Breakfast Club 
program celebrates its twentieth consecu- 
tive year on radio. On this past April 10, 
Don completed his twenty-fifth year before 
the microphone. 

Jerome Thor and his actress wife, Sydna 
Scott, have returned to the United States 
and ended their association with the For- 
eign Intrigue program. The couple say 
that two years in Europe was enough and 
they want to concentrate their professional 
activities on home ground for a while. 

Horace Heidt will be off for Europe in a 
few weeks for a four-month musical tour. 
He plans to play mainly for GIs. 

Yvonne King, one of the famous King 
Sisters who sang with Alvino Rey's or- 
chestra a few years ago, came out of re- 
tirement recently to make a guest 
appearance on the Jack Owen show, over 
ABC Radio. Yvonne, who is married to 
pianist Buddy Cole and lives in Hollywood, 
may resume her vocal career in the near 
future. 

Barry Nelson was chosen to play the 
male lead opposite Joan Caulfield in CBS- 
TV's My Favorite Husband series, set to 
start early this fall. Nelson, imtil recently, 
was starred on Broadway in the stage click, 
"The Moon is Blue." 

Whatever Happpened To. . . ? 

Muriel Angelus, former singer who made 
many guest appearances on radio a few 
years ago and also appeared in Broadway 
shows and in several movies? Miss Angelus 
more or less retired when she married 
NBC musical conductor and composer 
Paul Lavalle. They live on a farm in Wil- 
ton, Connecticut, with their daughter 
Suzanne. 

Ralph Byrd, well-known movie and radio 
actor, who at one time also played Dick 
Tracy on television? Ralph passed away 
(Continued on page 23) 



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21 




Waker-upper Jack Sterling makes money before anyone is up. 



JACK Sterling took over one of the most 
difficult replacement spots in radio five 
years ago. He was working as program man- 
ager for Station WBBN in Chicago— a CBS 
aifiliate — when the call went out for a man to 
replace Arthur Godfrey on his morning show 
over WCBS in New York. Although Jack had 
been in show business all his life, he hadn't 
the slightest intention of applying. Some other 
braver man could try to fill King Godfrey's 
shoes — not Jack Sterling. But his own station 
suggested he try out — so Jack agreed, provid- 
ing they pay for the recording he would have 
to send to New York. They did — and, the next 
thing you know, Sterling began waking New 
Yorkers up, and making them like it. 

Jack was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 
thirty-eight years ago. His father and mother 
were both vaudevillians — in fact, they were 
married on the stage of one of the theatres in 
the circuit. When two years old. Jack appeared 
as Little Willie in "East Lynne." By the time 
he was seven, he had shaped up his own min- 
strel act, and played the same bill with his 
parents from coast to coast. 

In addition to the Jack Sterling Show on 
radio, Jack is the Ringmaster on CBS-TV's 
Big Top. He admits that this assignment is a 
great deal of fun because it's so much like 
the old vaudeville days. Although Jack has 
been able to reach the top of the ladder in 
radio — he's still a sucker for the smell of 
greasepaint, and hopes that some day he will 
find a small stock company where he can put 
in some time acting. This may be quite soon, 
too, because Jack is planning to move to a 



Jack has always been 



a Sterling 



• - • 



Citizen 




Barbara MacGregor, Jack's fiancee, feeds him. 



suburban section when he is married (in 
June), and there he can join a little-theatre 
group. Once he marries his di-eam girl, and 
has his dream house — things will be just about 
perfect for this genial fellow. He'll probably 
spend most of his spare time in the kitchen — 
since he loves to cook, and is quite an expert. 
Or maybe he'll play a little golf — "little" is 
putting it mildly. But Jack's the sort of person 
you like to see succeed — he's such a sterling 
citizen — and that's no pun. 



I 



22 



What's New 
from Coast to Coast 



(Continued frovi page 21) 
rather suddenly in August of last year, in 
Hollywood. 

The Chordettes, the feminine vocal quar- 
tette who became so popular on Arthur 
Godfrey's radio programs and telecasts? 
Since parting company with the Godfrey 
organization, the Chordettes have been 
making personal appearances in and 
around New York. And, if the size of their 
fan mail is any indication, they may be 
set with a radio or television show of 
their own by the time this is in print. 

Lesley Woods, who used to be heard on 
the Lone Journey program and others? 
Lesley took time off from radio work to 
go to Europe with her architect husband 
who went abroad to study. However, she 
has been back about a year now and has 
been working very actively on many air 
shows. 

Danny O'Neill, the tenor who used to 
sing on many network programs from New 
York? Danny is now in Chicago, where he 
is heading a program called Breakfast 
With Danny O'Neill, over Station WBKB, 
Monday through Friday. 

In answer to our query a few months 
ago regarding the whereabouts of song- 
stress Nora Martin, who sang on Eddie 
Cantor's show a few years back, we re- 
ceived a letter from Nora herself, post- 
marked Portland, Oregon. She reports 
that she is starring in her own radio show 
called Happy Valley Ranch, over Station 
KGW, in Portland, and is happily married 
to her manager-producer, Stephen M. 
Janik, and the mother of two boys. Nora 
also says she hopes to be doing television 
before long. 

These are some of the personalities 
readers have inquired about. If you have 
wondered what happened to one of your 
favorite people on radio or television, 
drop me a line — Miss Jill Warren, Radio- 
TV Mirror Magazine, 205 East 42nd Street, 
New York City 17 — and I'll try my best 
to find out for you and put the infomia- 
tion in the column. Unfortunately we don't 
have space to answer all the questions, so 
I try to cover those personalities about 
whom we receive the most inquiries. Sorry, 
no personal answers. 

(Note: On all shows, both radio and tele- 
vision, be sure to check your local papers 
for time, station and channel.) 




Mr. & Mrs. "Stordust" Carmlchael. Hoa- 
gy prerriie:-ed his NBC-TV show June 6. 




UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PRESENTS 

Barbara Stanwyck 

fet I ©eSire 

co-sfarring 

RICHARD CARLSON -LYLEBEnGER 




Directed by DOUGLAS SIRK 

Screenplay by JAMES GUNN and ROBERT BLEES 

Produced by ROSS HUNTER 



23 



I 




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24 




DAY-TIME in 





Lunching atop the Terrace 
Plaza Hotel, Doris Day tells 
her husband, Marty Melcher: 
"Look at my home town! Isn't 
it wonderful?" And, while 
they're in Ohio, she happily 
Introduces him to some of 
the folks she'll never forget 
— like bandleader Barney 
Rapp (left), who gave Doris 
her first singing job In 
Cincinnati, and cousin Robert 
Welz (below), now a Captain 
of the Cincinnati Police. 




CINCINNATI 





Lifelong family friend Dr. Giles 
De Courcey is consulting physician 
to the city Fire Dept. So, under 
his watchful eye, Doris and her son 
Terry get on exciting close-up of 
the most modern fire-fighting gear! 




Uncle William Welz is proud of his many years as a baker of 
Ohio's breed — and proud, too, of his pretty niece, now a star 
of Warner Bros. Pictures (next, "Calamity Jane") and her 
own Doris Day Show over CBS Radio (Tues., 10:05 P.M. EDT). 



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2.'i 




the mystery of 

Morgan Baker 




26 



Back to camera as usual, Morgan Baker samples a sponsor's product. 



THERE are things about Morgan Baker 
which some people find mysterious. 
For example, quite a few people won- 
dered why he should leave sunny Cali- 
fornia to go to the rugged climate of 
New England. Of course, no real rock- 
ribbed native would have any question 
in his mind about that one — state pride 
being what it is. But still, they must 
admit that it's usually done the other 
way around. Then, of course, there's 
the matter of Morgan's face. Now that 



sounds like a peculiar thing to refer to 
as a "matter," but Morgan has a pecul- 
iar attitude towards his face — he won't 
show it. At least he won't for publicity 
purposes. 

Morgan is the director of the House- 
wives Protective League, heard daily 
over Station WEEI in Boston. He is 
also the emcee of Sunrise Salute. And 
all he does is talk. Not a singer — no 
comedian — just plain simple talk about 
all manner of subjects. But somehow 
his talk is one of the most popular 
things on Boston radio. Now, a man as 
well known as Morgan would certainly 
be expected to make public appearances 
where his face could be seen — but no — 
he has successfully managed to remain 
a faceless voice and a signature to his 
many listeners. The signature comes 
in at the bottom of his stationery in an- 
swering fan mail. And if the WEEI 
mail clerk is to be believed — Morgan 
gets more letters than he can handle. 

At this point folks might start getting 
some pretty strange ideas about Morgan 
Baker. Why is his face a mystery? Is 
he hiding something? Well, he isn't at 
all strange. Morgan lives in Milton in 
an ultra-modern ranch house. What's 
more he's married — has two children (a 
boy and girl) goes in for amateur pho- 
tography and furniture building, and 
drives to his job each day in a perfectly 
ordinary automobile. He's not in the 
least bit exotic — doesn't go in for col- 
lecting Ming china or delving into black 
magic. He just likes to remain a voice 
on radio. And he certainly has suc- 
ceeded with this technique — and there's 
no mystery about why. 



Information 
Booth 



(Continued from page 10) 
Dave Garroway. J. Fred's guardian, says 
that Muggs is just a little too young to 
take love seriously. By the way. J. Fred 
would be horrified at being called a mon- 
key — he's a chimpanzee, quite a different 
kettle of anthropoid. 

Our Mistake 

Dear Editor: 

Just to keep things accurate, I'd like to 
inform you that Johnny Desmond's wife's 
name is Ruth — and not Kay, as you 
printed in the May issue. 

B. B., New York City 

Sorry, you certainly are correct. Our 
face is red. Ruth Desmond is Johnny's 
wife — not Kay. 

Max 

Dear Editor: 

We think that the girl who plays Max 
on the Milton Berle show is adorable. Can 
you print her picture and tell us something 
about her? 

M. A., Omaha. Neb. 

Tiny Ruthie Gilbert (she's under five 
feet tall) is a native of Manhattan. Now 
in her early twenties. Ruthie entered the 
American Academy of Dramatic Art when 
only fourteen. She had not been there 
long when she heard that a very small, 
very young girl was needed for the cast of 
Eugene O'Neill's "Ah. Wilderness!" 
Ruthie auditioned and got the part. She 
then toured in several other plays. Her 
latest Broadway role was as a lady-shop- 
lifter in "Detective Storv." Noted for her 





Ruth Gilbert 




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Information 



skill with an exaggerated Brooklyn accent, 
she is equally convincing when she uses 
her own soft voice. Her acting goal is to 
someday play Nora in Ibsen's "A Doll's 
House." 

Dawn 

Dear Editor: 

Can you please tell me something of 
the background of lovely Dawn Addams, 
who used to play Alan Young's girl on 
Time To Smile over TV? 

S. T., Limestone, Maine 

Dawn Addams was born in Suffolk, Eng- 
land. Soon after her arrival, her father, 
who was a squadron leader of the Royal 
Air Force, took his wife and baby to India. 
Dawn was six when she returned to Eng- 
land. That year her mother died, so she 
was raised by her paternal grandmother. 
During the blitz, Dawn came to California, 
where she attended Beverly Hills High 
School. In 1945, she returned to England 
where she attended the Royal Academy of 
Drama. After completing an engagement 
on the London stage, Dawn went to Holly- 
wood. She has appeared in several movies 
for M-G-M, including "The Plymouth Ad- 
venture." Time To Smile was her first tele- 
vision assignment, but she took the fast 
pace of TV with typical English calm. She 
combines intelligence with great beauty. 

Note to Readers 

Dear Reader: 

We're pulling a switch on you this time, 
by telling you something without your 
asking. 

The Editors 

In our May issue, we included an item 
in Information Booth telling a fan of se- 




Dawn Addams 



Booth 



rial actress Jan Miner where to apply for 
information on starting a club for her. The 
name we gave was Miss Lil Stewart. But 
we did not mean that Miss Stewart would 
give general information on any fan club. 
Please, do not write to Miss Stewart un- 
less you're interested in Jan Miner. That's 
the only person Miss Stewart can answer 
questions about. 

Gloria's For Real 

Dear Editor: 

Is the young actress who portrays Har- 
riet Conklin on Our Miss Brooks really a 
teenager, or is she an older girl? 

R. F., Miami. Fla. 

Gloria McMillan, who is Osgood Con- 
klin's teen-age daughter on the Our Miss 
Brooks comedy, is certainly a real teen- 
ager. At least this year she is. for next, 
year she will be twenty. But not only does 
Gloria play the part on the show, she also 
acts as high-school adviser to the produ- 
cers. She keeps them informed on latest 
events in the high-school set. since she is 
much closer to that world than either of 
the producers — although, of course, they 
did attend high school once upon a time. 



FOR YOUR INFORM ATION—lf there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Injormation Booth. 
Radio-TV Mirror, 205 East 42nd St., New- 
York 17, N. Y. We'll answer, if we can, 
provided your question is of general in- 
terest. Answers will appear in this column 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 





Gloria McMillan 



ON THE LAWN: Especially delightful when the weather's balmy are Stanley '■outdoor" shopping 
Parties. At one of these increasingly-popular Lawn Parties, Mrs. H. S. Covington, Westridge 
Road, Greensboro, N. C, was the gracious hostess. Here an artist illustrates her attractive home. 

Outdoors or Indoors 

IT'S ALWAYS FUN TO SHOP AT STANLEY HOSTESS PARTIES 





IN THE KITCHEN: Informal as "house- 
work"" clothes, STANLEY "come-as-you-are" 
morning kitchen Parties provide a quick and 
pleasant way to shop for Stanley Products. 



IN THE LIVING ROOM: Your living room 
becomes especially hospitable when you 
invite friends to enjoy its comfort while 
they shop at your Stanley Hostess Party. 



Outdoors or indoors — morning, afternoon, or evening 
— you'll find Stanley Parties are always lots of fun. 
You just invite in your Stanley Dealer and this friendly 
Dealer demonstrates, under actual use conditions, 
Stanley's many value-leading, quality plus Products. 
Products both to save you time and work in most 
even,' housekeeping task and to improve the family's 
personal grooming. Small wonder that 12.000 of these 
famous STANLEY Parties now take place every single day. 



• To arrange for your own 
STANLEY Party, or for any in- 
formation about STANLEY, y;/j? 
phone or write your Stanley 
Dealer, your nearest Stanley 
HO.ME products Branch 
Office, or communicate direct 
with Stanley's Main Office 
in Westfield, Mass. 







STANLEY LEADS with more than 150 quality plus 
Products demonstrated exclusively at Stanley Hostess 
Parties: Housekeeping aids such as Mops, Brushes, 
Brooms, Dusters, Waxes, Polishes, Cleaning Chemicals. 
Personal Grooming Aids such as Toilette Articles. Bath 
Accessories and a wide assortment of Personal and 
Clothing Brushes. 



Originators of the Famous 

Stanley Hostess Party Plan 

Stanley Home Products, Inc., Westfield, Mass. 
Stanley Home Products of Canada, Ltd., London, Ont. 
CCopr. Stanley Home Products, Inc.. 1953) 



29 



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The intimate, inspiring story of the Desi Arnaz family is one which orily Hollywood's top columnist can tell. 

EVERYONE LOVES LUCY! 



By 

HEDDA 

HOPPER 



IT HAPPENED years ago, when Sam Groldwyn was about to make "Roman 
Scandals" and had brought twelve models from New York to appear in 
the picture. I went to the studio to look them over, and was immediately 
attracted by a platinxmi blonde with baby-blue eyes. "Why did you 
come out here?" I asked. 

"Because it was so hot in New York, and I was dead-beat standing 
on my feet modeling for Hattie Carnegie. So now I'm standing on my feet 



liM^iiyiiiymyyii i J 



See Next Page 

mmmoBmmmgm 



life h^n^^^OT^H)ng obstacle race; and Vm still niniiing," says Lucille Ball 




31 




EVERYONE LOVES LUCY! 



Lucy took Hollywood in her stride, right from the 
start (top, left, as on RKO starlet with Kay Sutton 
and Jane Hamilton]. "Lucy," says a friend from that 
era, "knew what she wanted when she came here." 




|;:';iU- ;y 


■ 






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They've had many battles, Desi admits — but always 
made up. Above, dating at the Trocadero when he 
was in service. Below, a kiss for a loyal wife who, 
gave a party for his opening at the Mocambo. 



Heddo Hopper (above, right) watched with interest 
as Lucy's movie career gathered momentum — and she 
had a most practical word of encouragement for Lucy 
and Desi as they hesitated over plunging into TV! 



32 







Christening: At Our Lady of the Valley Church, Reverend Michael hlurley beams on America's 
most famous baby, now pfficially named Desiderio Alberto Arnaz IV. Proud mama Lucy holds her 
"little man" — sister Lucie Desiree and papa DesI don't have eyes for anyone else in the world. 



! 



modeling for Sam Goldwyn." 

Her name was Lucille Ball; and, of the twelve models, 
Lucille became a star. She made the grade by sheer 
intestinal fortitude. Lucille once said, "My life has been 
one long obstacle race; and Fm stUl rvuining." How true! 

In her teens, Lucille v/as invalided by an auto 
accident. Rheumatic fever set in; and for three years 
she used either a wheel chair, crutches, or cane to get 
around. For most people that would have ended a 
career dream. But not for Lucy. Through sheer grit she 
learned to walk again. Then, defying all conventional 
attitudes, she struggled through incredible handicaps 
and became a professional dancer. For that alone 
I've always loved Lucy. 

She never got back to New York and her old job. 
"Roman Scandals," for which she was psdd $150 a week, 
stretched into six months of shooting time. Goldwyn 
kept the girls on salary for a year and a half, using 
them in other pictirres. 

One of that original troupe, now married and retired, 
told me: "Lucy knew what she wanted when she 
came here. She also knew she'd have to work hard. She 
didn't mind that, because work is part of Lucy's nature. 
I've always been irritated because Hollywood overlooked 
her talent so long. She doesn't, act. Lucy's a bom 
comedienne. Just being around her keeps you in stitches. 

"And she hasn't changed one bit since the first day 
I met her. En route to Hollywood, we were 'nobodies.' 
So, for publicity, Goldwyn arranged for us to stop in 
Chicago and dine with some celebrities. We got off 
the train all right, but ducked the Itmch, and ate in a 
hot-dog stand. She'd still be at home in a hot-dog joint." 

Yes, swing high or swing low, (Continued on page 71) 

Lucille Ball and Desi Amaz are seen in I Love Lucy, on CBS-TV, 
Mondays at 9 P.M. EDT, as sponsored by Philip Morris Cigarettes. 




Time was when Lucy clipped baby pictures out of 
advertisements to fill her hungry heart. Now her 
arms- are filled with her own little bits of heaven. 



33 





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Breakfast Club has lost more 
girl singers to marriage! 
Now what about Peggy Taylor? 
Peggy willingly confesses: 



Her heart holds a song 



By LILLA ANDERSON 



IN THE life of nearly every young woman there 
comes a golden year. Her friends, happy to 
see her lovely, beaming, accomplishing her 
ambitions, and looking forward to a promising 
future, sometimes realize, a bit more sharply 
than she does, the complete and charming pic- 
ture. But- the girl herself is never so sure. She 
can always see another rainbow in the distance 
— another thing to yearn for, to dream about. 
And she wouldn't be young, feminine and lovely 
if she didn't have these dreams and yearnings. 



That, approximately, siims up the present 
status of the Breakfast Club's dark-eyed beauty, 
Peggy Taylor. 

Says Peggy, "It's so wonderful to have one of 
the best jobs a vocalist can find in the country — 
just think of the number {Continued on -page 85) 



Peggy Taylor sings on Don McNeill's Breakfast Club, 
on ABC Radio, M-F, 9 A.M. EDT, as sponsored by Swift 
& Co., Philco Corp., 0-Cedar Corp., and The Toni Co. 




I 



Lots of helping hands for Peggy: Fronn left to right, producer Cliff Petersen, maestro Eddie Ballantine, announcers 
Bob Murphy and Don Dowd, singer Johnny Desmond, comedian Sam . Cowling — and Don McNeill himself. 



34 






J*. 




ROBERT 

Q. 
LEWIS 

Bespectacled Miracle Man 



He cant dance very well 



J 



36 




By PHILIP CHAPMAN 



LAST December, when young, personable, 
J bespectacled Robert Q. Lewis first took 
over as Arthur Godfrey's replacement, 
he decided that what he needed was a little 
vacation in the sun. Of course, the vacation 
couldn't be allowed to interfere with his 
work, which had to go on just the same. 

But Robert, who -for some time now has 
not given up doing a thing simply because it 
was impossible, started looking at plane 
schedules. On a map of the United States he 
described a circle, with the center planted in 
New York and the circle itself set at four 
hours' flying time from Gotham. 

I guess I've been a good hoy, Robei-t 
thought, because look where that crazy 
circle goes — smack through the middle of 
Miam,i Beach! 

He had already engaged a terrace suite at 
the Lord Tarleton in Miami Beach before he 
realized that by the time he finished his eve- 
ning show it would be too late to make the 
midnight flight from La Guardia to Miami's 
Intepnational Airport. 

Or was it. . . ? 



He called the Carey limousine outfit and 
asked them if they had a fast chauffeur. "I 
m,ean real fast." 

They did indeed. He was waiting in a 
Carey limousine outside the studio at the 
precise- minute that Robert came galloping 
across the sidewalk after his show, and they 
made the midnight plane. They made it every 
time, what's more, all through that mad com- 
muting vacation. As a result, Mr. Lewis did 
not miss a single day of sun. 

Now that he is once again replacing God- 
frey while Mr. Tops of radio and television 
recuperates, it would be well to recall 
Robert's remark about his status as the 
Godfrey substitute. A reporter from the 
Miami Herald said to him, "You're a celebrity 
in your own right, Mr. Lewis, and now all of 
a sudden everyone is referring to you as 
'Arthui* Godfrey's substitute.' Doesn't that 
get you down?" 

"Certainly not," Robert said. "It's fine." 
Then he added thoughtfully, "Financially, it's 
delightful!" 

To this, he now (Continued on page 73) 



Robert Q. Lewis's Little Show, CBS Radio, M-F, 4 P.M., for General Foods; Robert Q.'s 
Waxworks, CBS Radio, Sun., 10 P.M., for Webster Recording. Lewis is seen regularly on 
The Name's The Same, ABC-TV, Tues., 10:30 P.M., for Johnson's Wax and Swanson's Foods, 
and currently seen and heard on Arthur Godfrey Time (see page 46, this issue). All EDT. 



Ale can't sing very well, but— 



a 



e's sensational! 





37 



RED FOLEY'S 




A Family Man 




^v--i. 



"Real security comes from living 

with folks who really love you" — that's 

Red's idea of heaven on earth 

Bv GLADYS HALL 



RED Foley and Sally live in a beautiful, red-brick 
and white-columned Georgian Colonial house which 
Red built in Woodmont Estate, an exclusive section 
on the outskirts of Nashville, home town of Grand 
Ole Opry. 

It wasn't a likely day to be visiting the Red Foleys. 
Red wasn't feeling right pert, he'd said. Looked 
sort of homesick in the pine-paneled den of his own home. 
The French doors were thrown wide open, giving 
a view of the garden alive with jonquils and iris and 
tulips. Red bud and dogwood trees were in full 
bloom. The swimming pool shone with sparkling clean 
water. The deck furnitiu-e, which Red had lugged 
up from the basement, was piled up every -which way, 
waiting to be set in place. And Sally, Red's pretty, 
blonde wife, was standing by with tall glasses of 
orange juice and helping the (Continued on page 88) 



Daughters Shirley Lee, Julie Ann, Jennie Lou 
accompany Red in the pool (above) — wife Sally 
accompanies him at the piano (opposite page). 




39 



firand Ole Opry 




MINNIE PEARL'S 



"T Ti, Miss Minnie Pearl!**' they say in Nashville. On 
_|_ J[ every side, on every city street and on every coun- 
try road you hear it: "Hi, Miss Minnie Pearl!" 
From everyone — smart women and their menfolk in the 
lobbies of the Andrew Jackson and Hermitage hotels, 
little children in the fields — all and everjrwhere they hail 
her, "Hi, Miss Minnie Pearl!" And "Hi!" shouts back 
Miss Minnie Pearl, "Howdy, Matt or Joe or Tom or 
Miss Luciebell, howdy!" 

They all love Grand Ole Opry's Miss Minnie Pearl — and 
Minnie Pearl loves them. 

In private Ufe Miss Minnie is the wiie (and has been 
since 1946) of Mr. Henry Cannon, described by Miss 
Minnie as "a flyin' man." Before she became either Mrs. 
Henry Cannon or Miss Minnie Pearl, the name was 
Colley — Sarah Ophelia CoUey — but she was known as 



"Ophie" to every chick and child and elder in her home 
town of Centerville (just fifty miles southwest, as the 
crow flies, from Grand Ole Opry's home town, Nashville) . 

"There's been an Ophelia in my family," says Miss 
Minnie, "for generations. I made up the name Minnie 
Pearl. I just took the two countiy names I'd heard a lot— 
although I always heard them separately — and put them 
together." 

Today Miss Minnie Pearl is a household name. The 
hillbilly songs and piano playing and comedy "spooned 
up" by Miss Minnie Pearl are part of American folklore — 
even in faraway Korea. 

"Isn't Miss Minnie with you?" the boys asked when, a 
matter of weeks ago, a unit of Grand Ole Opry entertained 
the boys in Korea. "When will Miss Minnie Pearl come 
over?" (Soon, boys, very soon — ^she's working on it.) 



40 



Radio's man-crazy Gossip of 
Grinder's Switch has a man she really 
is crazy about — her husband ! 





They live near the city so "Miss Minnie" can connbine her 
broadcasting and house-and-garden chores — but "Mr. and 
Mrs. Cannon" love the country, go fishing when they can. 



Happily Married 



And when you meet her, what then? Will she be like, 
or unlike, the Minnie Pearl of your imagining? Well, some 
of both — as friends can testify. 

During the time Miss Minnie and her Henry were 
courting — were, indeed, engaged to be married — a war- 
time buddy Henry had known in Japan came through 
Nashville. 

According to Miss Minnie, the buddy called Henry, who 
said at once: "Come on, go out with us tonight." 

"Where '11 I meet you?" 

"Well, I tell you — ^my girl works at Grand Ole Opry, so 
how about your meeting me at the Ryman Auditoritun 
along around seven o'clock? Reserved seats for the Opry 
are sold out more than two months in advance. And the 
hne for unreserved seats starts forming at three o'clock. 
But likely I can get you standing room." 



"Henry's buddy got in. And I," says Miss Minnie Pearl, 
"came on. Now, before I go on, I take off all my make-up. 
I get into the white cotton stockings, the old country 
cotton dress, same like the original eighty-nine-cent dress 
I wore my first night in the Opry. On my head I clap 
the old sailor hat with the bunch of flowers in the front 
and the price tag a-dangling. My mother's hat, which 
I've worn from first to now — and keep repairing and re- 
pairing. I pick up my old red pocketbook with nothing 
in it — bone empty, as coiintry women's bags always are. 
Ladies, country women don't carry things you and I do. 
No lipstick, because they don't (Continued on page 81) 



Grand Ole Opry — with Red Foley and Minnie Pearl — NBC Radio, 
Sat., 9:30 P.M. EDT; Prince Albert Tobacco, Cavalier Cigarettes. 



41 




KEN MURRAY- 



Bet+y Lou is "secretary," as well as wife and mother, 
jotting down notes for Ken at any hour of day or night. 




By MAXINE ARNOLD 



EVERY day they spend together, Ken 
Murray and his lovely Betty 
Lou, convinces Ken that, as the 
song goes, the angels must have sent 
her, and they meant her just for him. 
They must have. There is, he's reason- 
ably sure, no other explanation. . . . 

And although, personally, he was 
always convinced of this — standing 
there in the mellowed peace and 
beauty of the Mission Inn in Riverside, 
California, that fateful December day 
they married, his whole hope and 
prayer was that he was meant for her. 
Ken was not particularly a praying 
man nor a crying man, but at that 
time — ^he was doing both. When asked 
whether one Kenneth Abner Doncourt 
would take Betty Lou Walters for 
his lawfully wedded wife . . . looking 
into the serious blue eyes of the 
fresh, lovely girl from Wenatchee, 
Washington, standing so trustfully 
beside him — he was almost too 
moved to agree. 

"I started crying — and somehow I 
couldn't stop. I had the feeling they 
were sending a boy on a man's job, in 
measuring up to her. She looked so 
— so sweet, so full of faith, so young." 

Their four harmonious and often 
hilarious years together are proof 
that the fates-that-be meant them for 
each other. For it was fate that cast 
them together when Betty Lou, then a 
neophyte radio actress, auditioned 
for a part opposite Ken. The audition 
was for "The Valiant," a serious 
di-amatic sketch he had decided to put 
right in the middle of all the laughs 
in "The Blackouts." This was a 
dramatic challenge, and frequently a 
brave one. 

"But 'The Blackouts' had been going 
a long time then," Ken says, "and I 
thought it was time to try something 
serious, and the Barrymores were 
busy, so — " 
They were {Continued on page 75) 



The Ken Murray Show alternates with the Alan 
Young Show in Time To Smile, on CBS-TV, Sun., 
9:30 P.M. EDT, for the Bristol-Myers Company. 



Home-time is a Great-time 




5, 



me was so youngs so sweet, he wanted her to be very 
sure of her heart. But Betty Lou knew from the first that their 
theme song was "Foi^ were meant for me' 



?9 



43 




h 



Bursche's grown since Joon first found him in 
Europe, but he's lost none of his puppy appeal! 



Life's hard-won 



Joan Lorring plays Grace Sargent 
in This Is Nora Drake — a person she 
can know and completely understand 

By MARY TEMPLE 



WHEN pert, blonde Joan Lorring is Grace Sargent, 
a confused and frightened teenager in the 
daytime radio drama This Is Nora Blake, 
a strangely sympatlfetic feeling steals over Joan. 
Her tears are real tears, her voice mounts in hysteria 
as Grace struggles to express her youthful emo- 
tions. For, remembering her own recent teen 
years, Joan Lorring is completely able'to xinderstand 
how bitter Grace's struggle to find herself can be, 
how hard-won the victories. Her own life 
allows for this understanding. 

Joan's life began in far-off China, bom there to 
a Spanish- Arabian father, a British subject, who 
was in business in Hong Kong, and to a German- 
Russian mother who had met Joan's father while 
she was attending the imiversity there. Those 
early years in China left their mark upon the chUd 
who knew little of any other life until her mother 
brought her to the United {Continued on page 94) 



This Is Nora Drake is heard on CBS Radio, M-F, 2:30 P.M. 
EDT, as sponsored by The Toni Company and Seeman Brothers. 



Born in China, Joan shows a childhood treasure to Ruth Newton and Joan Tompkins — then cooks for a chops+ick party. 



I 



I 




victories are hers 




Gay and well-adjusted now, young Joan loves being with people — particularly such nice ones as Ruth Newton 
(Vivian in This Is Nora Drake), Joan Tonnpkins (Nora herself), and the Dick Yorks (he plays Russ McClure). 



45 



ARTHUR GODFREY'S 

FATEFUL HOURS 




Destiny granted Godfrey great success — and made him 

win it the hardest way. But neither pain nor anxiety can 

dim the spirit which won the heart of all America! 



By IRA H. KNASTER 



VIEWED hastily, one milestone looks pretty 
much like another. It's when you take pains 
to study the reading nuatter on a milestone 
that you learn how much progress has been made 
on the long, long road. 

Sometimes, newspaper stories are like mile- 
stones. Take, for example, one which appeared 
on the front page of the Baltimore Sun on the 
morning of September 26, 1931. 

Radio Announcer Hurt 
Arthur Godfrey Injured in Collision 

AT HyATTSVILLE 

News of local interest, you see, about a strictly 
local character. Grand Junction, Colorado, read 
nothing of the incident. Muncie, Indiana, wasn't 
informed. Local. An item which stirred sympathy 
only within a fifty-mile radius of the nation's 
capital. 

Now consider a more recent headline, this one 
appearing over a United Press dispatch datelined 
Boston, April 10, 1953 — and wired to virtually 
every newspaper in the country: 

Surgeon For Godfrey 
Is Top Bone Expert 

Two significant headlines concerning Arthur 
Godfrey. Two "milestones," twenty-two years 
apart. Between those two markere lies a long 
road spiraling onward and {Continued on page 86) 

Arthur Godfrey Time, CBS Radio, M-F, 10 A.M. (M-Th, on 
CBS-TV) ; Snow Crop, Lanolin Plus, Fiberglas, Star-Kist; 
Pepsodent, Frigidaire, Pillsbury, Chesterfield, Toni, and 
Nabisco — Godfrey Sunday Hour, CBS Radio, Sun., 4:30 
P.M.; Rybutol and Juvenal — King Arthur Godfrey's Round 
Table, CBS Radio, Sun., 5 P.M.; Kingari & Co.— Godfrey 
And His Friends, CBS-TV, Wed., 8 P. M.; Pillsbury, Toni, 
Chesterfield — Godfrey's Talent Scouts, CBS Radio and 
CBS-TV, Mon., 8:30 P.M.; Thomas J. Lipton,lnc. AH EDT. 



A nation hangs on headlines which tell of a man's fighting courage 



46 





^^ 



ey 




Bill and Jean Thunhurst have two treasured 
possessions — aside from their love for each 
other — their sailboat, the Bonnie J (Bonnie 
Jean), and their eager beagle pup, Baskerville. 




Pictures are their hobby — old ones (mostly 
Scottish) to frame and hang, new ones to snap 
and show. "We've got enough films now," Jean 
laughs, "to bore people eight hours straight!" 




Sound the bagpipes for Jean Gillespie 
and her husband Bill — both Scotch, both 
top actors, and both blissfully happy ! 

By JEANNE SAKOL 



PRACTICALLY every day Wendy Warren, over CBS, 
advises little Jean Gillespie on some major 
problem in living. And the lessons are well 
learned. For Jean, off radio, discards the role of the 
innocent and becomes the very efficient — ^but gay, 
fim-loving wife of BUI Thimhurst. In a charming, 
four-room flat high above the busy East Side streets 
of Manhattan, Bill and Jean face life as it should be 
lived — ideally lived, that is — ^by a young married couple. 

"We love everything Scotch," enthuses Jean, 
"except the stufiE that comes in bottles! Bill's the one 
who started it all. When we {Continued on page 89) 

Jean is heard M-F in Wendy Warren And The News, CBS Radio, 
12 noon, for General Foods; frequently on Armstrong's Theatre Of 
Today, CBS, Sat., 12 noon— Whispering Streets, ABC Radio, M-F, 
10:25 A.M., for General Mills— Mr. And Mrs. North, CBS, Tues., 
8:30 P.M., for Colgate-Palmolive-Peet — Gangbusters, CBS, Sat.. 
9 P.M. Both Jean and her husband. Bill, are often heard also 
on Grand Central Station, CBS, Sat., 11 :05 A.M., for Cream of 
Wheat, and Aunt Jenny, CBS, M-F, 12:15 P.M., for Spry. All EDT. 





Wendy Warren's. 



■t' 




Little Mrs. Innocent 



49 



«»!?*^' 




Who's afraid of the breakers? 



Joan and Jane are set for 'em. 



Joan Alexander 
and her daughter 
Jane know how 
to enjoy each 
shining moment 



50 




V, 



Bcations 
are more fun 
than anything 




Jane shows her love for "Mommy. 



By MARIE HALLER 

" F stnpposE it could be said I'm prejudiced . . . 
I in fact, I am. I think my little 
six-year-old daughter, Jane, is adorable, 
wonderful, beautiful, bright, and — to just the 
right degree — good! But then I'm her mother, 
and I love her very much. . . ." 

Yes, Joan Alexander, one of Armstrong 
Theatre's glamorous stars, and a regtilar 
paneUst on The Name's The Same, is just like any 
other mother ... a httle prejudiced about 
her child. But with ample justification, for 
Uttle Jane is just about everything her 
mother says — even the (Continued on page 91 ) 



Joan's often heard Sat. on Armstrong's Theatre Of Today, 
12 noon; M-F, she's Maggie Fallon in Wendy Warren And 
The News, 12 noon, for General Foods — Delia Street in 
Perry Mason, 2:15 P.M., for Tide — Althea Dennis in The 
Brighter Day, 2:45 P.M., for Cheer; all on CBS Radio. 
Joan is seen Tues., 10:30 P.M., in The Name's The Same, 
ABC-TV, for Swan.son's Foods. Johnson's Wax. All EDT. 




Friends on a holiday: Little neighbor Ann Lynch (at 

left), "Nona," Joan, Jane, and actress Lucille Wall. 



They wait for an incoming wave. 



There's a leap — then o splash. 



Two gals having a wonderful time! 




Dennis James fell in love 




Dennis James and his "Mickie" are 
monarchs of all they survey, looking 
out over Echo Bay's sunlif waters. 



Boats hove always been his passion, and it was from a boat that Dennis 

first caught sight of the wide-winged house on the hill — and imagined himself relaxing there with the ideol wife. 




HOME FOR A LIFETIME 



with a dream house, then found the dream girl to share it with 




By MARTIN COHEN 



WHAT happens when a hvunan dynamo, namely 
Dennis James, star of Friend In Need on ABC 
Radio and Chance Of A Lifetime on ABC-TV, 
falls in love with a house? 

It w^as a romance that began innocently enough several 
years ago when Dennis, in his forty-two-foot boat, 
covered the waterfront from Manhattan to New 
England. Dennis was leading a bachelor's life then. 
From his Manhattan apartment he engaged in the myriad 
affairs that couple themselves with TV work. Dennis 
had little time for Dermis, and so his apartment served 
well enough as a headquarters {Continued on page 90) 



Dennis James stars as emcee of Chance Of A Lifetime, on ABC-TV, 
Thurs., 8:30 P.M., for Old Gold Cigarettes, and Friend In Need, 
ABC Radio, M-F, 11:30 A.M., for Toni Co. and others. (All EDT.) 




Dennis and Mickie at the vast picture window 
— Dennis and Louise at the cosy pantry door. 




53 



LAUGHTER'S THE WORD 




FOR LINK 



He's the guy I work for, the 
man we're paid to like . . . and we 
couldn't admire him more if 
he paid us a million dollars 




Link not only takes it, when the laugh's on him, but he 
listens to advice, too — Lois helped decorate his office. 



By DICK PETTIT 



EVERYBODY thinks my boss. Art Linkletter, 
must be a great practical joker! "Work- 
ing for Art must be a million laughs," 
they say. Or, "I'll bet he's always 
kidding, huh?" 

Yes and no. As one of Link's staff, I've 
gotten to know the man pretty well, and 
he's no practical joker. In fact, the joke's 
usually on him — ^but he takes it like the 
good sport he is. 

It was only after some time that I 
realized this. It took one bathtub full 
of JeU-O, two black (Continued on page 95) 



Thof's Ginger Jones at left, Link, Irv Atkins — 
and your modest author with back to the camera. 





Travel with our troupe never wearies him. He even makes 
still other journeys with Lois, to "show her the world." 



Art Linkletter's House Party is seen M-F on CBS-TV, at 2:30 P.M.— 
heard on CBS Radio at 3:15 PJVI. — as sponsored by Pillsbury Mills, 
Lever Brothers, Kellogg Co., Green Giant Co. He also emcees People 
Are Funny, CBS Radio, Tues., 8 P.M., for Mars Candy. (All EDT.) 



55 




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/le shadow of another man's past threatens Julie and Dan — and all 



56 



the 

DOCTOR'S 
WIFE 





2. Meanwhile at the hospital, Don listens as Frank 
Johnson tells about his son Richard, a "model prisoner" 
who is eligible for parole — if he can only get a job. 



3. Dr. Sanders and Don find a hospital job 
to fit Richard's qualifications — but outside 
pressure won't let them hire an "ex-convict." 



As Julie settled back in an easy chair 
and perched her feet on the coffee table 
before her, her brows knit in a puzzled 
frown. Her husband Dan would be home 
soon, and she had never kept secrets from 
him. Yet — should she tell Dan about the 
missing necklace? Should she, perhaps, at 
least hint that all was not going well since 
Richard had come to work for them? Oh, 
not that Richard wasn't wonderful at helping, 
in and out of the house, at doing the job 
Dan had outlined for him — but. . . . Julie 
thought of the unborn child she and Dan 
were about to have. Perhaps this time, God 
willing, the baby would come into the 
world healthy and strong, and start the 
family she and Dan hoped — with all their 
heart and soul— to build. Perhaps it was the 
thought of her child-to-be which, in spite 
of everything, helped to preserve her tender- 
ness for Richard and his great problem. . . . 
Funny how fate twisted things around, she 
mused to herself. It was a curious 
coincidence that she had found out she w^as 
going to have a child— at almost exactly 
the same time that Frank Johnson, the 
elevator man at the hospital, had told Dan 
about his son Richard. Richard had served 
five years of a term for armed robbery. He 
had been a model prisoner, and he could 
now get out on parole — if there were a job 



heir brightest hopes for the future 



See Next Page 



57 




4. Betty, their housekeeper, Is outspoken in her opposition to Don's and Julie's plan to hire Richard 
thennselves. But Julie needs extra help now — and they both believe they should practice what they preach. 



waiting for him. . . . When Jvdie had explained to Dan 
about her doctor's edict that she could no longer drive a 
car, no longer do any heavy work — no longer even be 
active in the garden she loved so much— Dan had finally 
admitted he was considering the possibility of having 
Richard come to work for them. "Why not?" Julie had 
asked. And Dan, in spite of his firm belief in the need 
for helping to rehabilitate ex-prisoners, had explained 
his doubts: Was it safe, was it right, to actually admit 
such a person into his own home, particularly at this 
time? Betty — Julie's housekeeper and virtually a member 
of the family — had argued against it with no uncertainty 
at all. But, between them, Julie and Dan had agreed that, 
if two people believed as they did and stiU didn't have 
the courage to put their own convictions into actual prac- 
tice, how could they expect others to believe? . . . Julie's 
thoughts went back once more to the missing necklace. 



Could she be sure she hadn't misplaced it? Also — even 
if it were stolen — what evidence was there to involve 
Richard in the crime? As Dan's footsteps sounded on their 
front porch, Julie made a hurried decision: She would 
not tell Dan. And so the next few days passed unevent- 
fully for Dan and Julie. Both were absorbed in their own 
personal spheres — Julie with her home, her charity work 
and her coming baby, Dan with his practice and hospital 
work. . . Then, suddenly, everything started closing in 
on them. Robberies were reported in the neighborhood, 
and the finger of suspicion pointed straight at Richard. 
He was accused by the neighbors and questioned by the 
police. Finally, the day came when Julie and Dan could 
stand it no longer and they, too, had a talk with Richard. 
Julie, almost beside herself with fear for Richard, sat 
quietly as Dan questioned him. To her, Richard's direct, 
honest eyes reflected only truth, only trust in the two of 



58 




5. After Richard starts working for them, Julie 
misses a valuable necklace. A series of robberies 
arouses the neighbors. Everyone suspects Richard! 



them, although his mouth held a sneer — a sneer for the 
neighbors, for those untrusting persons who had had him 
questioned by the police. . . . No matter what happened, 
thought Julie, her trust would never waver. The world 
might seem complicated and bewildering to a restless boy 
who had taken the wrong path, but that boy could turn 
back, could find the real world which was simple, true — 
and just. This she must believe, for the sake of her baby, 
the child who was to be ... a child whose feet would be 
set firmly on the right path from the start, because of the 
love and guidance she and Dan were so ready to give. 



Pictnred here, in their original roles, are: 

Jnlie Palmer Patricia Wheel 

Dr. Dan Palmer Donald Cnrtiis 

Betty Margaret Hamilton 

Dr. Sanderg Mercer McLeod 

Frank Johnson Ed Latimer 

The Doctor's Wife is beard over NBC Radio, Monday 
through Friday, at 5:45 P.M. EDT. It is sponsored by Ex-Lax. 



6. Dan and Julie give Richard a chance to vow 
his innocence — and Julie, at least, believes 
him. Will her faith prove to be her undoing? 







fr »• ■«:• t ,i 



y 






All her life, Miss Graffort has given. Through Ralph Edwards she receives— r 

THE BLESSED HELlI 



60 



At 74, Atha Graffort has reared almost a hundred foster children, still had seven to provide for when Truth 
Or Consequences canne to her aid. Result: A deluge of mail which delighted Postmistress Mellie Duval (right). 




By JANET SALEM 



WHAT a wonderful feeling to set the table, call the 
children, and know deep down that for what 
you are about to receive you can give heartfelt 
thanks to the Good Lord — and add a postscript for 
His modem miracle, radio! 

By what other means could a little old lady — seventy- 
four years old, stooped and slightly hard of hearing, 
living obscurely in Olney, Missouri (population 77) — 
have captured the attention and affection of thousands 
of people all over America? 

As Atha Grciffort selects the roast from her new deep 
freeze, prepares the evening meal at the shiny Tappan 
gas range and takes last night's leftovers from the 
gleaming Westinghouse refrigerator, she thinks back 
to the dark, dreary day just {Continued on page 92) 



Truth Or Consequences, NBC Radio, Thurs., 9 P.M., sponsored by 
Pet Milk. Ralph Edwards also emcees This Is Your Life, NBC-TV, 
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OF PEOPLE 




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the thousands of packages and money-gifts. 



61 



Dave insists the only true heartbreaker on Today Is Mr. J. Fred Muggs — the chomp chimp with the ope shape. 




The eligible Dave Garroway has 

just two real loves — ^50 far! 

A racing car . . . and a TV show m^^Jm^r\m J 



His sweetheart is just sixteen years old — a Jaguar speedster. 




BACHELOR 



By CHRIS KANE 



SOMETIMES you'll turn on the set, and there's 
Garroway lying flat on his back; Faye 
Emerson's on an adjoining table. They're 
both giving blood. NBC viewers are cordially 
invited to go forth and do likewise. 

Sometimes you'll turn on the set, and there's 
Garroway chuckling at a dark-haired man 
who turns out to be Al Capp. Capp's summing 
up the different types of American wives: 
"Like the one who's so busy reading articles 
on how to beautify her home and charm her 
husband that her hvisband's moved out three 
days ago, and she never put down the 
magazine long enough to discover it." NBC 
viewers are cordially invited to send in for an 
autographed American-wife cartoon by Capp. 
(Husband viewers, naturally. No wife would give 
Capp the satisfaction.) {Continued on page 83) 



f 



Today, starring Dave Garroway, is seen on NBC-TV, M-F, 7 
A.M. EDT, under multiple sponsorship. Dial Dave Garroway 
is heard on NBC Radio, M-F, 2:30 P.M. EDT, for Dial Soap. 



THE WOMAN IN 




Jessie Car+er (played by Janet Scott) gives heart and meaning to her home — in Wilmette, Illinois . . . her husband — James 
(Forrest Lewis), head of the Carter Real Estate Company . . . and their five children — as pictured on the following pages. 



64 



MY HOUSE 

Every man has his castle, but it 
takes a loving wife to make it ^^home'' 




Oldest son Jeff (Les Tremayne) is a writer ond a 
bachelor — and often a puzzle to his adnnlring family. 



IF A MAN is not complete in himself, he will know 
the meaning of. The Woman In My House. If he 
demands a home, and love, and children to carry 
on his name and ambitions and to live in his tradi- 
tion — if he needs someone to share his success and 
his failures, to be his companion when he has 
troubles, to laugh when he is amusing — if he needs 
someone to sympathize and to recognize his confu- 
sion in his search for the meaning of life — if he needs 
all these things, then he will know the meaning of 
The Woman In My House. 

Jessie Carter is the woman. James Carter is the 
man. For more than tMrty years, they have met 



The Woman In My House, on NBC Radio, M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, 
is a Carlton E. Morse production, sponsored by Sweetheart Soap. 




Daughter Virginia (Alice Reinheart) and 
husband Stanley Creighton (George Neise) 
are happy with thoughts of their first-born. 

Younger daughter Sandy (Shirley Mitchell) 
has known both joy and sorrow, but always 
has fun with brother Clay (Billy Idelson). 




See Biext Ptige ^ 



65 




Youngest of the Carter children is Peter (Jeffery 
Silver), 16, snapped here while chinning with the 
girl next door, Clarice Morris (Colette McMahon). 




Peter's curious, eager to learn from everyone — 
ond kind, generous, pleasure-loving Cloy is happy 
to tell him oil he knows obout such things as cars. 



THE WOMAN 
IN MY HOUSE 




Jeff worries the family with fears that he'll never 
marry — or else marry the wrong girl — but they would all 
welcome Caroline Wilson (Jeanne Bates) as an "in-law." 




and — to the best of their abilities — solved life's problems. 
Together, they have built a home and have brought five 
children into the world. . . . Jeff, the oldest son, has had 
his first book published and is working on a second. He 
is the thinker in the family — the son who may bring the 
most renown to the family name, but who may never 
find life's richest rewards. He is too unmindful of him- 
self, and success for the sake of success means very little 
to him. He helped to fight a war and perhaps learned 
that the individual counts for nothing, if mankind can 
find no solution to its problems. Sometimes he is a com- 
plete enigma to both James and Jessie — however proud 
of him they may be! . . . Virginia, the older daughter, 
wants little more in life than to love and be loved. She 
is married now, with a home in the country and a hus- 
band who is a commercial artist. Her mind has always 



66 




As part of the affectionate conspiracy to woo Jeff away from the wrong kind of woman — and steer him toward 
the right one! — Virginia and Stanley make a point of entertaining Jeff and Caroline in their comfortable home. 



been filled with the wonder of life and now, with a child 
of her own, she is finding fxill realization of this wonder. 
. . . Clay is the second son. For him, happiness means 
pleastire, and success is just the means of acquiring it. 
Eveiyone loves him for his kindness and generosity, but 
his father would dominate him and his mother would 
protect him — ^for each recognizes that he needs their 
help. . . . Younger daughter Sandy is a widow at twenty. 
Conftised by the tragedy of death, she has been seeking 
an answer for a happy world gone wrong, looking with 
despair for the confidence she knew so short a while ago. 
Honesty is her beacon, and she falters when that light 



flickers uncertainly. WUl she be afraid to take the new 
happiness life offers, when she knows how quickly it can 
be snatched from her? . . . Peter, the youngest son, 
explores each new turn of life with the insatiable 
curiosity of the sixteen-year-old, drawing conclusions 
which often come close to truth — for he still stands out- 
side life's forest. . . . James and Jessie now live for the 
most part in the lives of their children, and find little of 
importance that does not relate to them in some way. 
Thus, The Woman In My House is a drama of purpose 
and cross-purpose — weakness and strength, fear and 
hope — and the kind of faith America has always known. 



67 




By FRANCES KISH 



IF IN YOUR mind's eye you have pictured Florence 
Williams, who plays Sally Farrell in Front Page 
Farrell, as the friendly, down-to-earth, comfort- 
able sort of person you would like to have for a 
neighbor, you couldn't be more right. Her neighbors 
adore her, including all the children (and all the 
dogs) for miles around. Florence is about five-feet- 
two, with a compact little figure and wavy brownish 



hair framing a pretty face dominated By gray-green 
eyes. She's basically serious-minded and sensitive, 
yet quick to smile and full of fun. That's Florence 
Williams, the one her family, her friends, her neigh- 
bors and her husband, Andy, know and love. 

When Florence steps out of her five-days-a-week 
role as the understanding, helpful wife of crime- 
solving newspaper man David Farrell, she boards a 



Sally Farrell and Florence Williams are] 



68 



Front Page FarrelFs Wife 




Their country home is a labor of love for Florence and her real-life husbond, Andy Morshall. 
They've been busily remodeling the centuries-old farmhouse, with petite Florence (five-feet-two) 
working right alongside towering Andy (six-feet-thrfee) — and their dog Zannie overseeing every move. 




look-alikes, act alikes . . . and Florence couldnt he happier 



69 




Proud land-owners: The Marshalls and their "thoroughbred 
nnutts," Snoozy and Zannie, survey the farm's right-of-way. 




Concert for little neighbors Judy and Allan — plus an art 
exhibit (on wall) by Stoats "David Farrell" Cotsworth, who 
painted the small picture of their house on a recent visit. 



Front Page Farrell's Wife 



train to a country village about fifty miles 
from New York, where she is known as Mrs. 
Andrew Marshall. Andy — in show business, 
too, as a stage manager and technical director 
— ^is a six-feet-three blond who towers over 
his little wife. He has a skillful way with tools 
of all sorts, the know-how of tractors and 
gardening, and a sixth sense for cooking and 
seasoning. He's apt to have the dinner started 
any night he's the first one home. 

Their house — for the Marshalls— is a dream 
come true, a shared hope turned into reality. 
Home is a white clapboard farmhouse, with 
green trim, set in four rolling acres near a 
magnificent lake. The view in front is across 
a deep valley with high hills stretching out 
beyond. Wild blackberries grow in profusion. 
Trees are fine and old. Gardens are being laid 
out. Florence and Andy plan a greenhouse 
after a while. Already they have a patio and 
a barbecue for outdoor meals, and a rock 
garden for picturesque beauty. 

A home was one of the things that brought 
Florence and Andy, together. When they met, 
about four years ago, Florence was a young 
widow. Her husband, a talented yotmg artist 
and scenic designer, had been lost in the Bat- 
tle of the Bulge. Andy had come back from a 
long stretch as an Air Force Lieutenant and 
convalescence after a wartime plane crash. 
"We can thank a parachute for our happiness 
today," Florence says. "Andy was one of 
two survivors of that crash, is now a membpr 
of the famous Caterpillar Club, consisting 
of those who have bailed out similarly and 
lived to join it." 

Their first date was when Andy asked 
Florence to watch a theatrical performance on 
which he was working. They found after a 
while that there were many things they both 
liked — country living, puttering with carpentry 
and making things for a house, gardening, 
going fishing, looking forward to having chil- 
dren to share in these joys. 

"What Andy and I planned," Florence ex- 
plains, "was an old house that we could gradu- 
ally turn into the kind of home we both love. 
When we were married and began to look 
for such a house, we saw this one and it was 
a case of love at first sight. Neglected and 
sorry-looking as it was that first day, it felt 
exactly like home to both of us. We knew it 
had wonderful possibilities — ^but oh, the work 
we have had to do! Now we think how worth- 
while it has all been, and still is. We wjint it 
to be a weekend haven for some of our busy 
city friends. We're hoping pejhaps to bring 
some foster-children (Continued on page 96) 



Hear Front Page Farrell on NBC Radio, M-F, 5:15 P.M. 
EDT, sponsored by Chef Boyardee, Aerowax, and others. 



70 



{Continued from page 33) 
Lucy doesn't change. Over the years, I've 
watched her fight for career and marriage. 
I feel certain that, except for Lucy's dogged 
determinedness, that marriage would have 
gone bust. During the first two years, it was 
touch and go. Desi Arnaz is a hot-headed 
Latin. Lucille has a flaming temper, too. 

To add further to the marital difficulties, 
Desi — whom Hollywood couldn't see for 
sour dough — worked nights in clubs with 
his band. He was surrounded by beautiful 
girls. Lucy labored by day at the studio. 
But often she sat in a smoky, noisy night 
club until her man got through work. 
Desi, she decided, wasn't going to be 
tempted to stray from the straight and 
narrow. 

"In those days," Desi tells, "we had 
plenty of battles. And every time we quar- 
reled, I'd throw my clothes in a suitcase 
and move into a hotel room. The first thing 
I'd do was to send my clothes out to be 
pressed; but by the time they were re- 
turned Lucy and I would be made up 
again. That was an expensive proposition. 
What with the hotel and pressing bills! So I 
decided to build a guest house in our back 
yard. Lucy's mother, who has a great sense 
of humor, wanted to know why. I said, 
'When that daughter of yours and I fight, 
I'll move out here. I can't afford to move 
to town every time we get mad.' From 
the day that guest house was finished, Lucy 
and I never had a serious fight. 

"Of course, we still have difficulties. But 
we make it a rule never to go to bed 
without speaking to each other. I may say, 
'All right, what are you sore about?' That 
either starts us laughing or quarreling. 
But, either way, we get what's bothering 
us off our chests. You know, we get lots 



Everyone Loves Lucy! 

of letters from young married couples 
thanking us for helping them get along, 
from watching our television show." 

From the day Lucy married, she wanted 
children; but the stork stayed away from 
her door. She was so infatuated with babies 
that she'd cut pictui-es from advertisements 
and paste them in a scrapbook. Ten years 
passed before she had her first child; then 
came her second baby, who created as 
great a stir as President Eisenhower's In- 
auguration. I was in Washington for the 
Inauguration, and on the day of Desiderio's 
birth, I was having cocktails with pub- 
lisher Robert McCormick and his wife. 
The Marshall Fields joined us — and the 
first thing they said was: "Turn on the 
television. Lucy's having her baby." 

Three weeks later, I called on Lucy at 
her Northridge home. It's a trim, small 
farmhouse. The Arnazes, despite the fact 
that it represents a long drive into town, 
have lived there twelve years. 

When Lucy opened the door, she was 
wearing a flaring smock and, in her bright 
hair, a cluster of artificial white flowers. 
"You know, you don't give a hang how 
you look," I said, chiding her a little about 
the smock. 

"No. Thank goodness, I don't have to be 
glamoi'ous any more,'" sighed Lucy. "Try- 
ing to be beautiful bores me, stymies me, 
holds me down." 

That I believe. I recall a hot lunch hour 
when the two of us were walking along 
Sunset Boulevard. Lucy, who was doing 
a picture, was wearing her full make-up. 
Soon her mascara began to run; and her 
false eyelashes came loose. That disturbed 
Lucy not at all. She didn't mind the people 
staring at her. She just reached up and 
yanked off the other eyelash. 



We ate in a crowded restaurant. I'm 
sure the other diners thought Lucy had 
gone plumb daft. They couldn't hear her 
words, but they could see her facial ex- 
pressions. She was telling me about her 
cow. The Duchess of Devonshire, and 
mimicking the animal, even to cud-chew- 
ing, as she talked. 

■That bovine, incidentally, was something 
strictly out of I Love Lucy. Desi and Lucy 
acquired The Duchess when she was a 
day old, and raised her like a pup. She'd 
follow them around lovingly, which was 
cute — until the cow weighed 2700 pounds. 
They tried to keep her in a corral. But one 
night The Duchess got lonely, escaped the 
corral, and jumped right through their 
bedroom window. 

Desi and Lucy thought it was another 
earthquake. So The Duchess had to go. 
She was sent to board at a dairy farm, 
and ran up a $1500 feed bill, which rep- 
resented a tidy sum. They figured it would 
be cheaper to sell the cow and keep her 
memory green. So sentimental Lucy got a 
sanding machine and attempted to turn 
The Duchess's old feeding trough into a 
flower box. 

But she neglected to ask anybody how 
to operate the contraption. Once she got the 
machine turned on, she couldn't turn it 
off. It broke loose and began chopping up 
the Arnaz estate, with Lucy holding on 
and yelling like mad until Harriet, her 
maid, ran to the rescue. 

For years, Harriet has helped Lucy get 
out of such jams. She was a business-col- 
lege graduate whom Lucy discovered on 
the Help Thy Neighbor radio program. 
The two traveled all over the country, 
playing an endless gin rummy game as 
they trailed Desi and his band or went to 




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71 



m 



keep a show date for Lucy. "And what 
service she got us!" Lucille recalls. "Why, 
every railway porter from Hollywood to 
New York knew Harriet personally." 

Though Desi plays a hep husband on 
television, he, too, cein be a sucker for the 
impractical. When they first moved into 
their ranch home, Lucy was sitting on a 
box waiting for Desi to arrive with some 
chairs and a table. Instead of the furni- 
ture, he showed up with a crate of baby 
chicks. The weather was stormy, so the 
chicks were given the guest room. Lucy 
and Desi ■wrapped themselves in blankets 
and slept on the floor. All through the 
night, one or the other would be getting 
up to check on the health of those chicks. 

Put such incidents on TV, and few peo- 
ple would believe you — unless they knew 
Lucy. Once she was being coached by 
Jack Donahue for dance numbers in a 
Metro picture. Jack really put her 
through the paces the first day. And on 
the second day Buster Keaton wheeled her 
to the rehearsal hall in a hospital chair. 
Lucy had one arm in a sling, blacked-out 
teeth, tousled hair, and a bruised cheek — 
all done by courtesy of the studio make- 
up expert. In her one "good" hand she 
carried a sign: "I am now working for 
Donahue." She had fun parading her 
fake injuries all over the lot before she 
suffered a sudden misgiving that the gag 
might have embarrassed Donahue. So she 
went to him and asked, "You don't think 
anybody took me seriously, do you, 
Jack?" 

Such clowning is part of her nature; 
but she's also deadly serious. Many still 
believe that she and Desi reached over- 
night success with I Love Lucy. Nothing 
could be further from the truth. The idea 
for the show was a long time coming. 
Both Lucy and Desi first had to work a 
year-and-a-half to clear previous individ- 
ual commitments before they could play 
together. Then they went on the road to 
test audience reaction by doing a satire 
on the life of the Arnazes. They had to 
prove to themselves that people would 
accept them as a husband-wife team. Many 
said that people wouldn't. 

"Remember, Hedda, when I told you of 
my qualms about the show?" said Lucy. 
"With Desi being Cuban with an accent — 
and me being me — I didn't quite believe 
that audiences would take us as an aver- 
age married couple. But you just yelled, 
'For Pete's sake! You are married, aren't 
you?'" 

Lucy, who has more grit than her sand- 
ing machine, was determined to increase 
her fans before tackling television. And 
one thing she did still has Tom Rogers, 
of M-G-M, roaring with laughter. During 
her yearly layoff period at Metro, Lucy 
went back to New York and told him to 
get her on all the radio shows that 
couldn't afford to pay her any salary. If 
she didn't collect money for the appear- 
ances, the studio could do nothing about 
it. 

"When word got out that I was avail- 
able for free, Tom got calls from people 
and radio stations of which he'd never 
heard," said Lucy. "He'd tell me, 'I know 
you w^on't do this show, but I want to let 
you know about it.' I'd answer, 'Sure. 
That's exactly the type of show I want to 
appear on. Then I won't have to spend the 
next four years saying no when I'm asked 
to go on them.' Tom was confused. But 
I knew what I was doing. I wanted to 
reach all the people I possibly could in 
a short space of time." 
R Except for some amateur theatricals she 
lyi did with Lela Rogers, Lucy had never 
been on the stage. Desi was on the 
road with his band, so she figured she'd 
grab herself another hunk of audience by 



going East for summer stock. So what 
would Lucy do but pick one of the most 
difficult of modem plays, "Dream Girl." 
When she saw the size of her part and was 
told she had a week and a half to memo- 
rize it, she got the flu, took to bed, and 
learned her lines with the help of a high 
fever. "I really do think that tempera- 
ture helped me get those lines in my 
cranium," she dead-panned. 

Smart Lucy. She had a long-range am- 
bition to get the play into the Biltmore 
Theatre in Los Angeles to show Holly- 
wood producers she could handle a real 
dramatic part. Naturally, the other play- 
ers were anxious, too, to appear at the 
Biltmore, as it would offer them a show- 
case for movie talent scouts. But, after 
twelve weeks in the East, and a series of 
one-night stands on the road, disaster 
struck the company. 

"Our producer ran out of money," said 
Lucy. "Some of the players got sick. I 
had to pay some salaries and hospital bills 
from my own pocket. It looked like cur- 
tains. But I promised the cast I'd get them 
into the Biltmore, come hail or high 
water, if they'd cooperate. I threatened 
to conk anybody on the head who failed 
to get the proper rest." 

But leave it to Lucy. She did get the 
show into the Biltmore — then collapsed 
herself. "I was delirious during one whole 
matinee," she said, "and, by the time I got 
out of. the hospital, the play had had it. 
We folded shortly afterwards." Lucy went 
back to making pictures — and started 
having babies, after ten years of mar- 
riage. I remember how thrilled she was 
when she told me of her first pregnancy. 
But she lost that baby with a premature 
birth; and a saddened Lucy resigned her- 
self to not having children — which she 
wanted so desperately. 

But the Creator was kind. For three 
years she was almost in a constant state 
of pregnancy. Her first child prevented 
her playing the elephant girl in "The 
Greatest Show on Earth." The part went 
to Gloria Grahame, who won a newspaper 
poll for one of the best performances of 
the year in it. But Lucy didn't mind. To 
her the greatest show on earth was the 
sight of her first-born. 

Both babies were napping when I first 
arrived at the Northridge home, just after 
Desiderio's birth. Lucy rummaged around 
the room and found a newspaper that had 
headlined the story of her little son's en- 
try into the world with an eight- column 
front page streamer. But the story in- 
sinuated that Lucy had the baby by Cae- 
sarean to please her TV sponsors. That 
made Lucy see red. The operation was 
necessary, because Lucy couldn't have 
babies in the normal fashion. Her first 
baby had been born by Caesarean, too. 
The show's writers had decided to work 
the stork's expected visit into the show as 
a routine that happens to most married 
couples. But it was a delicate matter. 
Nothing like it had been done on tele- 
vision before; and I Love Lucy has a mul- 
titude of very young fans. In order to 
avoid offending anyone, the Arnazes had 
a priest, a rabbi, and a Protestant minister 
check all the scripts for anything that 
might be in poor taste. 

The phone rang. Lucy picked up the 
receiver, said "hello" six times, changing 
her voice on each occasion. But nothing 
happened. Lucy shrugged, hung up the 
receiver, muttering: "Gremlins." 

"Look at what Desi gave me for pro- 
ducing a son," she said, "a string of real 
pearls ... a pendant with a jeweled Tree 
of Life . . . and a Hammond organ. Want 
to see me play?" 

I certainly did. Lucy fumbled around 
with the organ until I thought she would 
pull some of the parts loose. Finally get- 



ting the instrument ready for operation, 
she sat down and dashed off "Sweet 
Georgia Brown" in swingtime, with one 
hand and two feet. "I've always had a 
hankering for an organ," she said. I won- 
dered why. With two children around the 
house, it would seem she'd have enough 
noise. 

The babies had been asleep all the while, 
but Lucy cut in on an intercom system 
to the nursery and I heard a series of 
gurgles and grunts. "They're waking up," 
said Lucy with a grin. "They'll be ready 
to say 'hello' any minute now." 

'Does your little girl show any acting 
talent?" I asked. 

"Not this week," she said. "Little Lucie 
sings and dances. She's — what's the word? 
All I can think of is 'susceptible.' Aw, the 
heck with it — she likes music." 

Lucy disappeared into the nursery, and 
over the intercom came the sounds of 
squeals. When she returned I asked about 
an old-fashioned clock on the mantel and 
oyster plates on the wall: "We used to 
have a clock like that when I was a child 
in Altoona, Pennsylvania." 

"My clock doesn't keep the right time," 
said Lucy. "It and the oyster plates be- 
longed to my grandmother. We used to 
live in Jamestown, New York." Suddenly 
she stopped, looked at me, and sniffed, 
" Altoona'." After all, we were just a couple 
of small -town girls together. 

A nurse brought the baby into the room 
and handed him to Lucy. She fondled 
him lovingly for a few minutes, then 
handed the most famous baby in America 
to me. The little shaver was amazingly 
strong. And his first reaction to a film 
columnist was to yawn, frown — and kick 
me in the stomach. He was a beautiful 
child, with blue eyes, sparse dark hair, a 
well-shaped head, and flat ears of which 
Lucy was particularly proud. 

Little Lucie peeped into the door to size 
up the situation before entering, then 
sidled up to her mother, and indicated 
displeasure and alarm to find her brother 
in a stranger's arms. She insisted that 
Lucy take him back. "It's Mama's baby," 
she said. 

"That's amazing," said Lucy. "Up to now, 
she's always claimed it was her baby." 
Little Lucie, with black wavy hair, dark 
brown eyes, and olive skin, is almost a 
dead-ringer for her father. She looks 
twice her age — "We keep forgetting that 
she's just twenty-three months, and ex- 
pect her to know all the answers." 

"I'm glad you're going back to Metro 
to make a picture ("The Long, Long Trail- 
er')," I said. 

"It's a beautiful script," she replied. 
"You know, Desi tried to buy the film 
rights to the book, but he couldn't com- 
pete with Metro. So here we end up 
doing the picture — and get $250,000 for 
it, too." 

I wondered out loud if she knew any- 
thing about life in a trailer. 

"Sure," she said. "My family and I 
lived in one a while one summer." 

As I left Lucille's happy home, dusk was 
steering over the orange groves, and in the 
background loomed a range of misty moun- 
tains. The air was sweet with the per- 
fume of thousands of flowers. "Now I can 
understand why you'll never give up this 
place for a Bel Air mansion," I said. 

"Someday we hope to have a helicopter 
and commute to work," she said. "It's a 
long drive out here. It was nice of you 
to come." Then she turned back to what 
she holds most dear: Her home, her hus- 
band, and her babies. A small-town girl 
who battled every step of the way up, and, 
having reached the top, remained com- 
pletely unimpressed with herself. 

No wonder everybody loves Lucy. 



Robert Q. Lewis — Bespectacled Miracle Man 



(Continued yrom page 37) 
adds: "After all, that's what started every- 
thing for me. Godfrey is quite a guy. It's 
an honor to be a substitute for him." The 
breezy candor that is the key to Lewis' 
personality, in real life as well as on stage, 
radio or television, is all there in that first 
crack. Young Robert Q. is in there 
pitching for success, and he's ready to do 
just about anything and everything to get 
it honorably. 

In consequence, he's in the position of a 
man who has been offered four or five 
different pieces of pie, can't make up his 
mind which one he really wants, and 
quietly sets out to eat them all. 

The absolutely crazy thing about Robert 
Q. Lewis is that he manages to eat all that 
pie without getting a stomach-ache — or a 
nervous breakdown. Right now he is do- 
ing radio, television, and night-club work 
besides replacing Godfrey. 

Recently Robert Q. worked and played 
dviring his night-club stint at the Algiers 
in Miami Beach. Of course, he had only 
the two evening shows, plus the usual ap- 
I)earances and publicity work and a benefit 
or two, so the whole engagement was like 
a holiday for him. 

The Algiers is the newest hotel in Miami 
Beach, or at least it still was when Robert 
played its fabulous Aladdin Room. Hotel- 
men put up three or four glittering, ultra- 
modem and luxurious hostelries a year in 
the town (out of the hundred major hotels 
of a hundred rooms or more buUt in the 
entire world last year, over sixty were in 
the Greater Miami area) ; but there is 
always one that tops the crop. 

So, for the prize act of the season, the 
Aladdin Room booked Robert Q. Lewis, 
who can't dance very well, who can't sing 



very well, and whose only props consist 
of a tableful of spectacles. 

He not only filled the enormous room 
night after night, which none of the other 
acts preceding or following him did, but he 
had scores of society's favorite people driv- 
ing sixty miles from Palm Beach to watch 
and applaud. 

The day before his opening show, Robert 
lay smeared with sun-tan oil on a sun 
lounge in front of his cabana at the Algiers 
pool, and talked to Bill Glick, public rela- 
tions man for the hotel. He was wearing a 
pair of shorts that were a little too tight, 
the sun oil goo made his pale New York 
face look somewhat less than handsome, 
and his hair w^as mussed. 

Nonetheless, other residents of the hotel 
(and their children) kept coming up to ask 
for an autograph and could they please get 
a snapshot taken standing or sitting beside 
him? He complied with good humor each 
time, with the sure knowledge that a lot 
of folks-at-home, shown those snapshots, 
were going to clutch the brow and holler, 
"What! That's Robert Q. Lewis? For Pete's 
sake, how does he get along with a face 
like thatV 

Meanwhile, between photographs and 
autographs, Glick tried to find out what he 
would have on his hands, publicity -wise, 
for the next few days. 

"About your show," he said. "What is it 
you do, exactly? What's the kickoff, how 
do you lead in for the laughs, what kind 
of audience do you need?" 

"Why," said Robert Q, "I do a lyric song 
about glasses, first. These homrims are my 
trademark, so I have a table covered with 
all sorts of specs, some of them special 
crazy jobs — like the wolf glasses — and I 
operate from there." 



"Uh," said Glick, trying to visualize this 
slim young man slaying a room full of 
sophisticated night-clubbers with a song 
about eyeglasses. 

"Of course it's clean," Robert added. 
"The whole routine's clean, all the way 
through." 

"Mmm," said Glick, remembering the 
successful acts of the season at other clubs 
around town, most of them with a dis- 
tinctly blue haze around them. 

"Well," Robert Q. went on mugging for a 
camera fan and signing autographs, "I 
throw in some gags about my replacing 
Godfrey, and then I do a soft-shoe and 
Charleston to 'Bye-Bye Blackbird' — natur- 
ally I can't dance any better than I can 
sing, but nobody seems to care — and then I 
do a satire on things and people named 
Lewis. And I finish with a little fractured- 
French ditty that I think is right clever. 
Okay?" 

That night, Mr. Lewis, blushing with 
a slight sunburn but otherwise impeccable 
in his dinner clothes, walked out before a 
packed, not very sympathetic house, and 
fractured more than French. He did ex- 
actly what he had told Glick he was going 
to do, but he did it with a kind of offbeat, 
easygoing manner which refreshed every- 
one in the Aladdin Room. 

All the members of the orchestra, all the 
waitresses, everyone who could be pulled 
into the act (including the members of 
Robert's fraternity chapter in Miami) 
wore homrim specs exactly like his. 

They loved the glasses number. His 
soft-shoe and Charleston had more good- 
will and energy than technique, but bUst- 
ers and then calluses rose on the palms 
of the audience as they roared their ap- 
plause. And, by the time he had run off 



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his fractured-French ditty and grinned his 
way from the floor, there was no doubt 
that he was a smash hit. 

'"What Bob had," Click says, with won- 
der in his voice, "was the ability to make 
all those paying people believe they were 
at a houseparty, where everybody gets into 
the act sooner or later. Lewis was just the 
topper, the best." Bill, who spent more 
time than anyone else with Robert during 
his stay, ended up a Lewis fan himself. 

'"I started liking the man as soon as I 
discovered he was really human," Glick 
says. '"He'd come off that floor after a 
show wringing wet, even with the air- 
conditioning on, and the applause would 
be going on and on, and he could see 
that captains and waiters were having to 
make tables in the aisles to accomodate 
the crowd. And yet Lewis would get dis- 
couraged with himself. 

'"Here the hotel was paying him some- 
thing like $2500 a week for gagging around 
and having some fun. And what he'll get 
for the Godfrey stint and all the other 
stuff would choke the mint. And all he 
could do was worry if he was good enough 
in his shows." 

In one w^ay, the March stay in Miami 
was a disappointment for Robert, be- 
cause he loves to fish and never got to 
go fishing once. Each day he'd say to 
Glick, "Hey, let's get a boat and do it to- 
day." And each time Bill would have to 
say, "I'm sorry. Bob, but there are some 
record shops that want you to make an 
appearsince and autograph records," or, 
"Well, there's this benefit we promised 
you'd do — " 

But Lewis loves kids, so he had the 
fun of being the star performer at the 
Miami Youth Roundup. (There, as usual, 
he was asked what the "Q" in his name 
stood for. "I'm just curious to know," one 
of the kids said to him, and he replied, 
"That's what it stands for. Curious to 
know. I'm curious, too, because I just 
stuck it in there to make the name look 
and sound more interesting. Anything to 
attract a little attention to myself.") 

GUck, thinking back, recalls that Robert 
is not easy to get acquainted with, right 
at first. '"He wants to be friendly," he 
said, "but he's still kind of shy. It's a nice 
quality, once you know him, but some- 
times people get the wrong impression at 
the beginning. The funny thing is, he's 
the most cooperative gent in the world 
when you want something different. For 
instance, when the Dade County Road Pa- 
trol came to pick him up to take him to 
the Youth Roundup, he let the sheriff 
handcuff him even though we didn't need 
that." 



Glick thinks it's funny that Lewis en- 
joys being billed as an "international star" 
just because he once played the Elmwood 
Casino in Canada. And he thinks Robert 
played Santa Claus in a very decent 
fashion when a twenty-one-year-old 
pianist named Freddie — who at the time 
was just a page at NBC — asked for an op- 
portunity to try out as Lewis' accompanist. 

"Why not?" asked Robert Q. when the 
request came in. (Most big stars do not 
entertain such requests from pages or 
office boys). "Godfrey gave me my big 
chance. Maybe the kid's got something." 

He certainly had. He's been Lewis' ac- 
companist ever since. 

"Aside from everything else," Glick will 
tell you admiringly, "Bob's a master of 
the ad lib. At the Youth Roundup the 
kids asked him what a day in a record- 
ing studio was like. Bob told them it was 
dull, for the most part. 'They have a 
strange breed of humans in recording stu- 
dios,' Bob said, 'called musicians. Other 
people have different names for them, but 
I'll just call them musicians. . . .' " 

And it seems that, when the youngsters 
asked him how he got started, he replied, 
"There I was at the bottom of the laddei- — 
and I've been there ever since. When I 
told my folks I was going into radio they 
started to laugh, and they're still laughing!" 

Robert did manage to have some real 
fun during his Algiers stay, however. He 
disappeared for a few evenings, and in 
his quiet way managed to see the town, 
and make most of the night spots, with 
beautiful Cam Stevens, whom he had met 
previously in Palm Beach. She is a so- 
ciety girl and one of the most stunning ob- 
jects that ever graced a dance floor. 

It was nothing very serious, if you're 
thinking of an important love affair. But 
in Miami, with that famous moon hanging 
low over the tropical water and the much- 
publicized breeze rustling through all 
those ubiquitous palm trees, you can 
make like a shipboard romance, part 
friends, and paste the experience in your 
mental memory book. 

A native New Yorker, Robert got started 
early because he was fascinated by chil- 
dren's radio programs and kept hanging 
around them until eventually he got a 
chance to participate. He went to the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and got so bored there 
that he left to take a job as an annouqcer 
in an independent "Troy (upstate New 
York) station. 

After a short, happy cai'eer in the Army 
Air Force he came back to one radio job 
after another, until they hired him as a 
disc jockey on WHN. 'This was his forte, 
and he and everyone else soon recognized 



74 



For Exciting Listening 
Don't Miss 

"THE ADVENTURER" 

Starring Burgess Meredith 

ABC Radio Network 

Every Sunday at 9:30 P.M., E.D.T. 

(Check your local newspaper radio lisfings.) 

You'll en/oy "The Saga Of The Incredible Godfrey" — Me honesf 
fruth about the fabulous Arthur in July issue of SAGA Magazine. 



it. Not much later he was hired by WCBS. 

When he was twenty-four, Robert Q. 
Lewis was able to describe himself as 
"the youngest has-been in radio." This was 
because, one crack-brained evening while 
he was emceeing a regular fifteen-minute 
sustaining show on WNBC, he decided to 
go all-over cute and kid the pants off the 
vice-presidents of his radio network. 

A year or two later Fred Allen pulled 
the same gag and got away with it. Bui 
then, Fred Allen was big enough to gel 
away with it, while Robert Q. was just 
another employee running a sustainer. 

Robert described, on his show, the hor- 
rendous business a lowly radio employee 
had to go through in order to navigate the 
channels from studio to the desks of vice- 
presidents. With sound effects, yet, he 
swam rivers of boiling oil and ran a gaunt- 
let of pitchforks. 

It was a terribly funny program. 

The next day he was advised to clean 
out his desk and start packing, inasmuch 
as he had been automatically fired the 
night before. 

Two years later he was filling in for 
the Jack Smith Show and for Mystery Ol 
The Week. And on Saturday nights, be- 
tween eight and eight-thirty — a formidable 
half-hour to all who knew radio in that 
bygone year — he ran his own Robert Q. 
Lewis Little Show. 

It's difficult to say just what this guy 
had (and still has) that kept him in the 
radio-TV picture, pushed him to the front, 
and made him the overwhelmingly success- 
ful personality he is today. Certainly, part 
of the answer is that his appeal, comedy or 
otherwise, derives from the same source 
as Arthur Godfrey's. 

The stately New York Times made a 
sincere attempt to figure Lewis' appeal, and 
Robert did his best to help. He said to 
Edwin E. Gordon, the reporter assigned 
to the job of interpreting Lewis to his 
audience, "I try to be an individual. I 
try to be myself, the kid next door. He 
has something to say, too, if people will 
only listen." 

In other words, Lewis concentrated on 
comedy derived from realistic situations 
that could happen to anyone, anywhere, 
any time. Well, isn't that what Godfrey 
does? Is it any wonder that Godfrey list- 
ened to Robert Q. Lewis a few times and 
then said, "That's my boy"? 

When Robert Q. Lewis is on the air and 
the screens, who can say why he charms 
— this guy who, replacing Godfrey, whis- 
tled off-key because Godfrey always whis- 
tled on key. . .? Thousands have written 
in and said they liked the way Robert sang. 
"They like my singing," Lewis says, with 
a bemused look in the eyes behind those 
big specs. "Can you beat it? My singing's 
pleasantly atrocious." 

Yoimg Robert Q. will not have to mea- 
sure his success this year — since it is al- 
ready written in the books — but rather to 
sift it. His task is to begin making a 
choice, and it's hard to think of a more 
difficult job for a man of Lewis' tempera- 
ment, in his predicament. 

But his friends and his critics tell you 
this: "The guy has bitten off more than 
he can chew. He is the victim of too 
much success. Nobody can do everything. 
Nobody can do radio, television, a night 
club act, and sub for Godfrey — all at the 
same time. He's got to make a choice, 
sooner or later." 

That's what his friends say. Maybe it 
ain't necessarily so. 

R. Q. Lewis has the answer up his sleeve, 
somewhere. When he has time to get 
around to it, he'll pop up with the answer. 
Only by that time — what'll you bet? — he'll 
have done it all, anyway, and banked the 
dough. 

With Robert Q. there's always a way. . . . 



Il 



I ,„ „„,, 

two against the world — and at first the 
audience was sometimes incUned to say so 
— braving it there together amid all the 
hilarity. To make Bettys advent more im- 
pressive, Ken would announce authorita- 
tively that appearing in the skit with him 
was "the very well-known actress from 
the East— Miss Elizabeth Walters" . . . 
pausing to infer that hers was a name 
with which they were undoubtedly famil- 
iar. With the result that, often when he 
introduced her to Hollywood celebrities 
backstage, they would smile knowingly 
with, "Oh, yes, I met Elizabeth in New 
York a long time ago." Which was very 
amusing, since she'd never been farther 
east than North Hollywood at that time. 
Other patrons leaving the theatre could be 
overheard saying, "Good play. You can tell 
those New York actresses every time." 

So sensitive was Ken about their dra- 
matic spot, and so conscious of any sounds 
which interrupted it, that he decided to 
break the laughter by making a confiden- 
tial little speech out front before they went 
on. "I know this month we've all been suf- 
fering with that old debbil flu. So if you 
want to, we'll all cough and clear our 
throats right now." This produced an in- 
spired quiet for the ensuing little drama. 

Love and mutual admiration blossomed 
for them on the stage of the El Capitan 
Theatre, the two of them building a dra- 
matic success sandwiched in between Ken 
and Marie Wilson's Broadway comedy, a 
bulldog act, parading glamourlovelies, some 
amazing trained lovebirds, and an English 
quick-change artist. 

"I've always admired leadership, and 
Ken was such a leader," Betty Lou says 
now. "I admired him so much. He was so 



Home-time Is a Great-time 



definite. He always knew what he was 
doing. He had strength and a wonderful 
sense of humor, and he was always so 
sweet and thoughtful of me." 

"That's what I admired about her," Ken 
says. "Her honesty. She was the most 
honest girl I'd ever known and I loved 
her for it — and still do." 

It was Ken who insisted they wait three 
years before they got married. "We'll wait 
untU you're a little older," he would say, 
"at least until you're twenty-one. You're 
too young to know your ov\ai mind now. 
I want you to be very sure." As sure as he 
had been for some time then. Neither of 
them ever remember him proposing. "I 
didn't actually. I just told her, 'Every tim'e 
you do a good show, I'll give you a kiss.' 
And she did a great job so many times, 
we came to like it," he grins. 

When they announced their engagement, 
Bing Crosby — who has been a friend of 
Ken's since Bing toured with Ken's unit 
in 1929 — asked, "What's the bride's favorite 
tune?" 

Ken told him. "You Were Meant For 
Me," adding — "That's mine too. Why?" 

Ken found out when Dixie Crosby 
brought a recording to Betty Lou's shower. 
Bing had recorded the song especially for 
her, with parodied lyrics of "The Girl That 
I Marry," merging into one beginning: 

"She was meant for him. 

Lovely, sweet and slim. 

People told her she was bound to go 
far — 

So she hitched her wagon — to a 
cigar. . . ." 

As Ken says, "Betty Lou's perfect for 
me." Insisting, "I'm a nervous, irritable 
individual, although I try never to bring 
any irritations home with me. But she 



never says a word. She never objects to my 
cigars. She never minds if I dress like this," 
he says, indicating his breezy sports en- 
semble and the blue denim sneakers with 
the sponge rubber soles he calls comfies. 
"And if she has to hear the same stories, 
over and over, she never looks bored. 
Never gives me that 'Oh, you're-not- 
going-to-tell-that-one-again look." 

"Ken." 

"She the closest thing to an angel I've 
ever known," he says slowly. "She's the 
only person I can imagine living in a 
trailer with. . . ." 

"Ken. The phone's ringing," Betty Lou 
breaks into the conversation to remind 
him. 

"Oh — oh — yes — pardon me," he says, 
reaching out and retrieving it with an 
experienced hand. 

Reminding her husband the phone's 
ringing is for Betty Lou almost a full-time 
job. "It was Ken's idea to muffle the phone," 
she laughs. "He kept saying, 'Something 
has to be done about this phone,' " The 
phone, with its extensions in every room 
of their Hollywood home, sounded like a 
five-alarm fire. As a result of the muf- 
fling, now Ken gets so wrapped up in all 
the various Ken Murray Enterprises he 
seldom ever hears the phone — untU Betty 
Lou reminds him. . . . 

Although Betty Lou occasionally appears 
with him on TV, her career now is looking 
after Ken and his home and happiness. 
Which she finds warmly rewarding — as is 
signified, too, by the thousands of souvenirs 
she saves of their lives together. When Ken 
says. "My wife saves things," this is the 
most underplayed line of his entire career 
in show business. His wife saves every- 
thing, and she gets misty-eyed just looking 





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76 



Name 

Addre>>- 
Cify 



through the scrapbooks at the pressed 
flower Ken wore in his buttonhole when 
they were married, at the receipt for two 
dollars for their wedding license, and at all 
the nostalgic reminders in the scrapbooks 
which are crowding them out of house and 
home. "Ken kids me about them, but he 
likes for me to save things, really," she 
says. "He's always coming in with a 'Here, 
honey, here's a program,' or something — 
and saving me things to save." 

But even her ever-loving husband did a 
double-take watching Betty Lou posting 
a new entry in their daughter Pamela's 
scrapbook, soon after she was born. "What 
is that?" he asked curiously of some dark 
green string she was carefully entering. 
"String from the flower-box wrappings," 
she said matter-of-factly, going right on. 
"Oh, honey — come on now," he said. "After 
all, how far can you go with this thing?" 

IDaily, he knows, she can go all the way. 
Along with such nostalgic frothy bits as 
the nut cups and the angel on the cake 
from her baby shower are such realistic 
reminders as the identification card from 
Pamela's hospital crib, reading, "Murray 
—Girl— 2/4/52— 5:52 P.M."— and another 
upon which are chronicled "Results Of 
Hemoglobin Test." 

There, too, are the many telegrams she's 
received from Ken — including one ad- 
dressed to their first-born and datelined 
Washington, D. C: "Dear Pamela: Sure 
got a kick out of holding you in my arms 
this morning. Tell your mommy I love her 
like crazy. Dad." This he sent en route for 
a much-needed rest. For, as Betty Lou 
laughs, "Ken was so worn out, he bad to 
take a trip. He went to Florida for ten days 
after the baby was born to recuperate." 

"I was a wreck," Pam's father recalls. 

Like Dad, like daughter — true trouper 
that she is, Pam made her entrance on a 
Monday, in time for Ken to share his nride 
w^ith the whole country, in the form of a 
hilarious sketch about her on that Satur- 
dav's television show. 

Where once he rose at high noon. Ken 
always awakes by seven a.m. now. "Honey, 
I hear the baby downstairs. I think I'll go 
down and keep her company." And soon 
they're both in business, building blocks 
in the breakfast room like mad. 

When Pamela says "Da, da," he's as 
proud as though she invented it. And he 
attaches dramatic and half-humorous 
significance to every move of a finper. Tf 
she pokes a toy with a finger: "Look, 
honey, our daughter's going to be an 
atomic scientist," Ken laughs. If she bangs 
her fist on the piano: "A concert artist no 
less." 

Already Pamela's an actress, having 
portrayed Laurie Anders as a baby in 
Ken's production of "The Marshal's Daugh- 
ter." All wardrobed in a little polka-dot 
dress and bonnet and riding a horse with 
Ken between scenes, Pamela fairly gurgled, 
which inspired her father to observe: 
"Look, honey, she likes the wide open 
spaces, too. She's going to be a Western 
movie star." 

Despite Ken's gallant "Betty Lou's the 
only person I can imagine living in a trailer 
with," this would be stretching imagina- 
tion too far. How then could he practice his 
clarinet at three a.m.? "Ken took six 
clarinet lessons by correspondence when 
he was a kid, and — for a kid who took six 
clarinet lessons — he plays amazingly well. 
Yet, conscientious performer that he is, 
whenever Ken plans playing his clarinet 
on his television show, he rehearses — at 
three in the morning," Betty Lou confides. 
He has his regular warm-up medley too, 
beginning with "St. Louis Blues," waxing 
into "Three O'clock In The Morning," a 
little of "Lies," and winding up with "Home, 
Sweet Home" — and about time. 

Also, Ken keeps pads and pencils by the 



side of their king-sized bed in the blue 
and gold bedroom. A groggy Betty Lou 
frequently awakens and starts taking dic- 
tation from him, saying sleepily, "Wait a 
minute — wait a minute — " when he forgets 
she's trying to keep up in longhand. 

He keeps her busy in the wardrobe de- 
partment, too. And for a fellow who's 
amazingly sensitive to beauty and to color, 
as indicatwd by the lovelies and their cos- 
tumes on his television show — he has 
somewhat individualistic ideas concerning 
his own attire. 

Ken gets so attached to some garment 
he likes — such as a favorite plaid cashmere 
robe which he wore "until it hiked up in 
the back and had holes in the seat" — that 
he wouldn't give it up until it could be 
replaced with another exactly like it. The 
weight and texture of material is all- 
important to him. The gabardine must be 
exactly one weight. The cashmere — kitten - 
soft. Finally Betty Lou got a bolt of the 
softest cashmere she could find, and had a 
New York dressmaker come over to their 
apartment and cut a pattern from the old 
robe. "I couldn't even let her take it home 
for the night. I knew he'd call for it," she 
laughs. 

As for the sponge rubber-soled denim 
numbers he wears, she admits now, "Buy- 
ing those for him was really a mistake. I 
got them last summer because I thought 
they would be comfortable for him to 
lounge around in, and now he wears them 
all the time." Once he became so attached 
to a pair of white buckskin shoes with 
rubber soles, which she bought him one 
summer, that when he had to make a 
business trip to St. Louis, the following 
winter he insisted on wearing them. "But 
you can't wear those, honey. They'll lock 
you up, thinking you're completely crazy — 
wearing white buckskin shoes in mid- win- 
ter in Missouri," she said. 

He insisted he didn't have any others to 
wear. No others he liked, he meant. Shop- 
ping all day long, Betty Lou finally found 
two pairs of nine-dollar suede shoes, one 
brown pair and one blue pair she dyed 
black, in time for his train. "That was 
three years ago — and he's still wearing; 
them," she says. "I've had them re-soled 
and re-capned for the last time. I can't 
have them half-soled again, but I've found 
a place in Los Angeles where they'll make 
a mold for forty dollars that can exactly 
dunlicate his nine-dollar shoes." 

Ken's unfulfilled ambition, he admits 
today — and about the only thing he hasn't 
tried in all his years in show business — is 
"to be guest conductor and lead a one- 
hundred-and-fifty-piece symphony in 'The 
Hungarian Rhapsody' in the Hollywood 
Bowl. This is the greatest ambition of my 
life," he grins. "Not that I'm a symphony 
lover at heart, but I would love to walk 
out there in my cutawav, turn to the audi- 
ence and say, 'Surprised?' — and then give 
the downbeat with, 'Hit the violins, boys.' " 

With all his enterprises, how he would 
find time to direct a one-hundred-and- 
fifty-piece symphony in the Hollywood 
Bowl, only Ken Murray would know. But 
he undoubtedly would. As he says, with 
the wisdom of one who's watched so many 
climb and fall on the ladder of fame, "I've 
never wanted to depend on any one voca- 
tion." 

And, while other wives might be inclined 
to sympathize with Betty Lou Murray for 
having a husband whose vocations sur- 
round him with the most glamorous girls 
in Hollywood or on Broadway, she would 
be the first to point out that Ken's been 
engulfed by glamourlovelies ever since 
they met. "Happiness calls for complete 
faith," she says. 

As for Ken — why audition . . . when 
you've got the queen of them all at home? 



I 



nside Radio 

All Times Listed Are Eastern Daylight Time. 



Monday through Friday 



MBii 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Programs 



8:30 


Do You Remember? 


Local Program 




Jack Hunt 


8:45 




8:55 Gabriel Heatter 


John MacVane 
8:55 B«tty Crocker 




9:00 


Alex Dreier, News 


Robert Hurleigh 


Breakfast Club 


News Of America 


9:15 




Tell Your Neighbor 




Barnyard Fellies 


9:30 


Thy NeighlMir's Voice 


Cliff's Family 




Joan Edwards Show 


9:45 


Ev'ry Day 






In Town Today 


10:00 


Welcome Travelers 


Cecil Brown 


My True Story 


Arthur Godfrey Show 


10:15 




Music Box 




with Robert Q. 


10:25 






Whispering Streets 


Lewis 


10:30 


Double Or Nothing 


News 






10:45 




10:35 Jack Kirk- 
wood Show 


When A Girl Marries 




11:00 


Strike It Rich 


Ladies Fair 


Live Like A 




11:15 




11:25 Holland Engle 


Millionaire 




11:30 


Phrase That Pays 


Queen For A Day 


Turn To A Friend- 


Grand Slam 


11:45 


Bob Hnoe Show 




Dennis James 


Rosemary 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 

12:15 

12:30 
12:45 




Cur. Massey Time 

Capita. Commentary 
with Baukhage 

12:55 Music Box 


Don Gardiner, News 
12:10 Jack Berch 
Valentino 

Bill Ring Show 


Wendy Warren 

Aunt Jenny 

Helen Trent 
Our Gal Sunday 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 


News, Home Edition 
Dr. Paul 


Cedric Foster 

Luncheon With Lopez 
1 :55 News 


Paul Harvey. News 
Ted Malone 


Road Of Life 
Ma Perkins 
Young Dr. Malone 
The Guiding Light 


2:00 
2:15 

2:30 
2:45 
2:55 


Dave Garroway 
Jane Pickens 
News. Banghart 


Say It With Music 
2:25 News. Sam 

Hayes 
Mac McGuire Show* 
Music By Willard 


Mary Margaret 
McBride 

Betty Crocker 

2:35 Tennessee Ernie 


Second Mrs. Burton 
Perry Mason 

This Is Nora Drake 
Brighter Day 


3:00 
3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


Life Can Be Beautiful 
Road Of Life 
Pepper Young 
Right To Happiness 


Cameo Talks 

3:05 John Gambling 


Tennessee Ernie 
(Cent.) 

3:55 Edward Arnold, 
Storyteller 


Hilltop House 
Art Linkletter's 

House Party 
Home Folks 
3:55 It Happens 

Every Day 


4:00 

4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


Backstage Wife 

Stella Dallas 

Young Widder Brown 

Woman In My House 


Music By Bob And 
Dan 

Lucky U Ranch 


Cal Tlnney Show 

4:25 Betty Crocker 
Jack Owens Show 


Robert Q. Lewis 

4:05 Chicagoans 
Treasury Bandstand 
4:55 News 


S:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Just Plain Bill 
Front Page Farrell 
Lorenzo Jones 
The Doctor's Wife 


5:55 News, Ceci! 
Brown 

*T, Th— Paula Stone 


Big Jon And Sparkle 
Fun Factory 
Ronnie Kemper 
Lum 'n' Abner 


News 

5:05 John Falk 



Monday 



Evening Programs 



6:00 




Local Programs 




Jackson & The News 


6:15 


Bill Stern 






Dwight Cooke 


6:30 








Curt Massey Time 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 


News Parade 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Beulah 


7:15 




Mr. Mystery 


Elmer Davis 


Junior Miss 


7:30 


News Of The World 


Gabriel Heatter 


The Lone Ranger 


Jo Stafford 


7:45 


One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 


Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


The Railroad Hour 


The Falcon 


Henry J. Taylor 


Crime Classics 


8:15 






Field & Stream 




8:30 


Voice Of Firestone 


Hal. Of Fantasy 


Concert Studio 


Talent Scouts with 


8:45 








Garry Moore 


9:00 


Telephone Hour 


News, Bill Henry 




Lux Theatre 


9:05 




Reporters' Roundup 






9:30 


Band Ot America 


Off & On The Record 


Jan Peerce Show 




9:45 










10:00 


Dinah Shore Show 


Frank Edwards 


News Of Tomorrow 


Bob Hawk Show 


10:15 


Robert Ambruster. 
Music 


Elton Britt Show 


Virgil Pinkley, News 




10:30 


News, Clifton Utiey 


Eddie Fisher 


Edwin C. HiK 


News, Robert Troui 


10:35 


Al Goodman's 
Musical Album 


10:55 News, Singiser 


10:35 Freedom Sings 


Cedric Adams 






Evening Programs 



6:00 




Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & The News 


6:15 


Bill Stern 






You And The World 


6:30 








Curt Massey 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 


News Parade 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Beulah 


7:15 




Hazel Markel 


Elmer Davis 


Junior Miss 


7:30 


News Of The World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Silver Eagle 


Jo Stafford Show 


7:45 


One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 


Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


Eddie Fisher 


That Hammer Guy 


S. R. 0. 


People Are Funny 


8:15 


Rosemary Clooney 








8:30 


First Nighter 


High Adventure 


Paul Whiteman Teen 


Mr. & Mrs. North 


8:45 






Club 




9:00 


Summer Show 


News, Bill Henry 


America's Town 


Johnny Dollar 


9:05 




The Search That 
Never Ends 


Meeting Of The Air 




9:30 


Fibber McGee & 


Off & On The Record 




My Friend Irma 


9:45 


Molly 




E. D. Canham, News 




10:00 


Two For The Money 


Frank Edwards 


News Of Tomorrow 


Louella Parsons 


10:15 




The Valley Boys 


Virgil Pinkley 


Doris Day 


10:30 


News. Clifton UtIey 


Bands For Bonds 


Edwin C. Hill 


Robert Trout. News 


10:35 




10:55 News. Singiser 


10:35 United Or Not 


Cedric Adams 



■ 


vvt^anebui 


;|^B Even 


ing Program 

ABC Reporter 


us 


6:00 




Local Programs 


Jackson & The News 


6:15 


Bill Stern 






You And The World 


6:30 








Curt Massey 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 


News Parade 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Beulah 


7:15 




Men's Corner 


Elmer Davis 


Junior Miss 


7:30 


News Of The World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Lone Ranger 


Jo Stafford Show 


7:45 


One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 


Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


Walk A Mile— Bill 


Crime Files Of 


Mystery Theatre 


FBI In Peace And 


8:15 


Cullen 


Flamond 




War 


8:30 


Great Gildersleeve 


Crime Fighters 


Summer Show 


Dr. Christian 


9:00 


You Bet Your Life— 


News, Bill Henry 


Mr. President 


Playhouse On Broad- 


9:05 


Groucho Marx 


Family Theatre 




way 
9:25 News 


9:30 


Scarlet Pimpernel 


Off & On The Record 


Crossfire 


What's My Line? 


10:00 


Bob Hope Show 


Frank Edwards 


News Ot Tomorrow 


December Bride 


10:15 




Elton Britt Show 


Virgil Pinkley 




10:30 


News, Clifton UtIey 




Edwin C. Hill 


Robert Trout, News 


10:35 


Dangerous 




10:35 Latin Quarter 


Cedric Adams 




Assignment 


10:55 News, Singiser 


Orchestra 





Thursday 



Evening Programs 



o:00 




Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & The News 


6:15 


Bill Stern 






You And The World 


6:30 








Curt Massey 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 


News Parade 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Beulah 


7:15 




Rukeyser Reports 


Elmer Davis 


Junior Miss 


7:30 


News Of The World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Silver Eagle 


Jo Stafford Show 


7:45 


One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 


Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


Roy Rogers 


Official Detective 


Top Guy 


Meet Millie 


8:15 


8:25 News 








8:30 


Father Knows Best 


John Steele, Adven- 


Heritage 


On Stage 


8:45 




turer 






9:00 


Truth Or Conse- 
quences 


News, Bill Henry 


ABC Playhouse 


Summer Show 


9:05 




Bishop Fulton 
J. Sheen 






9:30 


Eddie Cantor Show 


Off & On The Record 


Time Capsule 


Bing Crosby 


10:00 


Judy Canova 


Frank Edwards 


News Of Tomorrow 


The American Way 


10:15 




The Valley Boys 


Virgil Pinkley 
Edwin C. Hiil 


with Horace Heidt 


10:30 


News, Clifton UtIey 


Eddie Fisher 


Robert Trout, News 


10:35 


Jane Pickens Show 


10:55 News, Singiser 


Orchestra 


Cedric Adams 



Friday 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Bill Stern 
Three Star Extra 


Local Program 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & The News 
Dwight Cooke 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


News Parade 

News Of The World 
One Man's Family 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Mr. Mystery 
Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 
Lone Ranger 

7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 


Beulah 
Junior Miss 
Jo Stafford Show 
Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Eddie Fisher 
Rosemary Clooney 
Summer Show 


Movie Quiz 
True Or False 


Adventures Of 

Michael Shayne 
Fun For All 


Mr. Keen, Tracer Of 

Lost Persons 
Mr. Chameleon 


9:00 
9:05 
9:30 
9:45 


Bcb & Ray 


News, Bill Henry 
Rod And Gun Club 
Off & On The Record 


Ozzie And Harriet 

Corliss Archer 
9:55 News 


Music In The Air- 
Donald Richards. 
Alfredo Antonini 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:35 


Dinah Shore Show 
Words In The Night 
News, Clifton UtIey 
Bob MacKenzie 


Frank Edwards 
The Valley Boys 
Dance Orchestra 
10:55 News. Singiser 


Fights 

Virgil Pinkley, News 
News Of Tomorrow 
10:55 Edwin C. Hill 


Capitol Cloakroom 

Robert Trout, News 
Cedric Adams 



77 



I 



nside Radio 



Saturday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Programs 



8:30 
8:45 


Howdy Doody 


Local Program 


News Summary 


Renfro Valley 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Farming Business 
Mind Your Manners 




No School Today 


News Of America 
Robert Q. Lewis 


10:00 
10:15 

10:30 

10:45 


Archie Andrews 

Mary Lee Taylor 
Show 


Local Program 

Frank Singiser, 

News 
Helen Hall 


Space Patrol 


Galen Drake 
Let's Pretend 


11:00 

11:15 

11:30 
11:45 


My Secret Story 
Modern Romance 


Coast Guard 

11 :25 Holland Engle, 
News 

Farm News Con- 
ference 


Platter Brains 
Music 


News, Bill Shadel 
11:05 Grand Central 
Station 

Give And Take 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 
12:15 
12:30 

12:45 


News 

Coffee In Wash- 
ington 


Man On The Farm 
Fifth Army Band 


101 Ranch Boys 
American Farmer 


Theatre Of Today 

Stars Over Holly- 
wood 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 


National Farm And 

Home Hour 
U.S. Army Band 


Music 

Game Of The Day** 

Ruby Mercer 


Navy Hour 

Shake The Maracas 


Fun For All 

City Hospital 
1:55 Galen Drake 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


Design For Listening 


2:25 Headline News 
Georgia Crackers 


Late News 
Playland, U.S.A. 


Music With The Girls 

Make Way For 
Youth 


3:00 

3:15 

3:30 
3:45 




Bandstand, U.S.A. 
3:25 Headline News 
Sports Parade 


Late News 

Martha Lou Harp 
Show 


Report From Over- 
seas 

Adventures In 
Science 

Farm News 

Correspondents' 
Scratchpad 


4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


Stars In Action 
Ambruster, Music 


U.S. Army Band 
College Choirs 


Horse Racing 
Treasury Show 


Treasury Bandstand 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Big City Serenade 

Author Speaks 
Key To Health 


Preston's Show Shop 
5:55 H. R. Baukhage 


Tea & Crumpets 

Paulena Carter, 

Pianist 
Club Time 


Washington, U.S.A. 
At The Chase 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 

6:30 

6:45 


George Hicks 
News, H. V. Kal- 

tenborn 
NBC Summer 
Symphony, Milton 
Katims Conducting 


Dance Orch. 

Country Editor 
Preston Sellers 


Una Mae Carlisle 
Bible Messages 

Harry Wismer 

As We See It 


News, Ed Morgan 
UN On Record 

Sports Roundup 

News, Larry LeSueur 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


Talent, U.S.A. 


Al Heifer, Sports 
Pentagon Report 
Down You Go 
7:55 Cecil Brown 


Speaking Of Business 
Women In Uniform 
Dinner At The Green 
Room 


Broadway's My Beat 
Vaughn Monroe 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Talent, U.S.A. (Cent.) 


20 Questions 
Virginia Barn Dance 


Margaret Whiting's 
Dancing Party 


Gene Autry 
Gunsmoke 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Pee Wee King Show 
Grand Ole Opry 


New England Barn- 
yard Jamboree 
Lombardo Land 


ABC Dancing Party 
(Cent.) 


Gangbusters 
9:25 Win Elliot 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 


Eddy Arnold Show 

Meredith Willson's 
Music Room 


Chicago Theatre Of 
The Air 


At The Shamrock 
Orchestra 


Country Style 
News, Ed Morgan 



78 






Sunday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Programs 



8:30 


Jack Arthur 




Light And Life Hour 


Renfro Valley Sun- 
day Gathering 


9:00 
9:15 

9:30 
9:45 


World News Roundup 
We Hold These 

Truths 
Carnival Of Books 
Faith In Action 


Elder Michaux 
Back To God 


Milton Cross Album 
Voice Of Prophecy 


Trinity Choir 
World News Roundup 

E. Power Biggs 
Organ Concert 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 


National Radio 

Pulpit 
Art Of Living 
News, Peter Roberts 


Radio Bible Class 
Faith In Our Time 


Message Of Israel 
College Choir 


Church Of The Air 


11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 


Faultless Starch Time 
Viewpoint, U.S.A. 
UN Is My Beat 
The Living Word 


Frank And Ernest 
Bromheld Reporting 
Reviewing Stand 


Fine Arts Quartet 
Christian In Action 


Salt Lake Tabernacle 

Choir 
News, Peter Hackes 
11:25 Invitation To 

Learning 



Aiternoou Programs 



12:00 
12:15 
12:30 

12:45 


Sammy Kaye 
The Eternal Light 


College Choirs 

News, Bill 

Cunningham 
Merry Mailman 


News 

The Great Fraud 

Piano Playhouse 


News Story, Bill 

Costello 
Howard K. Smith 

News, Costello 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 


Youth WantsTo Know 

Univ. Of Chicago 
Round Table 


Fred Van Deventer 
Lanny Ross Show 
Lutheran Hour 
Game Of The Day** 


Herald Of Truth 
National Vespers 


Galen Drake 
Syncopation Piece 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


The Catholic Hour 
American Forum 


Bandstand, U.S.A. 

Wings Of Healing 
Dixie Quartet 


Pan American Union 


The Symphonette 

European Music 
Festivals 


3:00 
3:15 

3:30 
3:45 


Critic At Large 
Youth Brings You 

Music 
Songs Of The Wild 
Elmo Roper 


Top Tunes With 
Trendler 

Musical Program 


Marines In Review 
Hour Of Decision 


m 


4:00 
4:15 
4:30 

4:45 


G.I. Joe 

Jason And The 
Golden Fleece 


Under Arrest 

Dear Margy, It's 

Murder 
4:55 Ed Pettit, News 


Old-Fashioned 
Revival Hour 


America Calling 

Godfrey's Sunday ji 
Hour ■ 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


The Chase 
Counter-Spy 


The Shadow 

True Detective 
Mysteries 


This Week Around 

The World 
Greatest Story Ever 

Told 


King Arthur God- 
frey's Round Table 

Choral Symphony 

5:45 News, Bill 
Downs 

S:55 Cedric Adams 



*Heard only in southeast, southwest and central states 



Evening Programs 



6:00 


Bob Considine 


Nick Carter 


Monday Morning 
Headlines 


Music Show a 


6:15 


Meet The Veep 


6:25 Cecil Brown 


Don Cornell 


■ 


6:30 


Listen To Wash- 


Squad Room 


George Sokolsky 


Our Miss Brooks 


6:45 


ington 








7:00 


Juvenile Jury 


Treasury Varieties 


American Music Hall, 


Guy Lombardo J| 


7:15 






Burgess Meredith, 
Emcee 


f 


7:30 


My Son Jeep 


Little Symphonies 




Summer Show 


7:45 










8:00 


Phil Harris And Alice 


Hawaii Calls 


American Music Hall 


Summer Show 


8:15 


Faye 




(Cont.) 




8:30 
8:45 


Summer Show ; 


Enchanted Hour 




My Little Margie 


9:00 




Jazz Nocturne 


Walter Winchell 


Hallmark Playhouse 


9:15 






News, Taylor Grani 


Escape .'■ 


9:30 


Dragnet 


Answers For 


The Adventurer, 


9:45 




Americans 


Burgess Meredith 


10:00 


Barrie Craig 


Great Day Show 


Paul Harvey 
Alistair CooKO 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 


10:15 






works 


10:30 


Meet The Press 


Music Of The People 


Science Editor 


News, Ed Morgan 
10:35 Listen To Korea 



II 



TVp''og''q"^ highlights 

NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN CHANNEL 6 JUNE 11— JULY 10 



Baseball on TV 



Pre-game Programs: 
Happy Felton's Knothole Gano — 30 minutes Cli. 9 

liefore Dodsjer games 
Joe E. Brown — 15 minutes before Yankee games Ch. 11 



Thur.. June 11 

Fri., June 12 

Sat., June 13 

Sun., June 14 

Tues., June 16 
Wed., June 17 
Fri., June 19 

Sat., June 20 
Sun., June 21 
Tues., June 23 
Wed., June 24 
Thurs., June 25 
Fri., June 26 
.Sat., June 27 
Sun., June 28 
Tues., June 30 

Wed., July 1 

Thurs., July 2 
Fri., July 3 
Sat., July 4 

Sun., July 5 
Mon., July 6 

Tues., July 7 
Wed., July 8 
Thurs., July 9 
Fri., July 10 



P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 



TIME 

1:.30 
1:30 
8:00 
8:30 
1:30 
1:30 

2:00 P.M. 

2:05 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 



GAME CH.4N^ 

Cine. VS. Dodgers 9 
Milwaukee vs. Giants 11 
Chi. vs. Dodgers 9 

St. Louis vs. Giants 11 
Chi. vs. Dodgers 9 

St. Louis vs. Giants 11 
St. Louis vs. Giants 11 
Chi. vs. Dodgers 9 

Giants at (!inc. 11 

Giants at Cine. 11 

Detroit \s. \anks 11 
Milwaukee vs. Giants 11 



&6 
&6 



&6 
&6 



&6 
&6 



8:00 
8:30 
1:.30 
8:00 
1:.30 
2:00 



P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 



1:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 



2:00 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
8:00 P.M. 
8:30 P.M. 
8:30 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 
8:00 P.M. 
(D) Means Double-header 



Detroit vs. Yanks 11 

Detroit vs. Yanks 11 

Chicago vs. Yanks 11 

Chicago vs. \anks 11 

Chicago vs. Yanks 11 

Cleveland vs. Yanks 11 

Cleveland vs. Yanks 11 

Cleveland \s. Yanks 11 

Phila. vs. Dodgers 9 

Boston vs. Giants 11 

Pitts, vs. Giants 11 

Phila. vs. Dodgers 9 

Phila. vs. Dodgers 9 

Phila. vs. Yanks 11 

Pitts, vs. Dodgers ( D ) 9 

Phila. vs. Yanks (D) 11 & 6 

Dodgers vs. Giants 11 

Phila. vs. Giants 11 

Yankees at Phila. 11 

Phila. vs. Giants 11 

Boston vs. Yanks 1 1 

Boston vs. Yanks 1 1 

Wash. vs. Y anks 1 1 

Giants vs. Dodgers 9 



L 



Post-game Programs: 

Happy Felton's Talk With The Stars Ch. 9 

Frankie Frisch's Clubhouse Interviews Ch. 11 

Joe E. Brown With The Yankees Ch. 11 



Monday through Friday 



7:00 A.M. Today • 4 A H 

(jiarroway rises with the sun, bringing news and feature stories. 

I0:00 A.M. Arthur Godfrey Time • (M-Th) 

Robert Q. Lewis emcees this favored show while Arthur recovers. 

I1:00 A.M. One in Every Family ^ 2 & H (M-Sat) 

From Hollywood, bright audience-participation with Dean Miller. 

11:30 A.M. Strike it Rich • 2 & 6 

The show with a heart tugs at your hearts. Warren Hull emcees. 

I2:00 Xoon Bride And Groom • 2 

June brides at their loveliest. Grooms nervous as usual. 

i2:I3 P.M. Love Of Life • 2 A ti 

Peggy McCay stars in this serial as compassionate careerist. 

I2:30 P.M. Search For Tomorrow • 2 & H 

Day-by-day story of real-life conflicts starring Mary Stuart. 

I2:t5 P.M. Guiding Light • 2 f& C at 2:H0 P.M.) 

Herb Nelson and Ellen Demming in this intriguing drama. 

I:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 & O 

Garrulous Garry's funfest with Durward. Denise Lor, Ken Carson. 

2:00 P.M. Double Or \othing • 2 & 6 (M,\\,F) 

Bert Parks whoops it up with interviews and quiz game. 



2:30 P.M. Art Linkletter's iioutte Party • 2 

Guaranteed gaietv as Art engages in hilarious hijinks, 

3:tfO P.M. The itig Pay-Off • 2 & O 

Daytime quiz with de luxe prizes for women. Randy Meiriman, 

emcee. 

3:00 P.M. lire all The itanh • 4 

The show that has paid out more than $2,000,000 in hard cash 

goes on giving away the green stuff with Win Elliot host. 

3:00 P.M. Paul Dixon Show • S 

Variety show with Paul. Wanda Lewis, Sis Camp and lots of 

music. 

3:3tt P.M. Welcome Travelers • 4 & ti 

Tommv Bartlett catches travelers en route for engaging gabfests. 

4:30 P.M. Ted Steele Show • II 

.Steele with two golden hours of great vocals and instrumentals. 

.■i:00 P.M. iiawkinft FmIIm, Pop. 0,200 • 4 

.Serial drama of life in a typical, small U.S. community. 

7:30 P.M. Kddie Fisher • 4 (\V,F) 

The young lyric baritone sings out. Don Ameche is host. 

T:30 P.M. iHnah Shore Show • 4 (T,Th) 

Last few weeks to catch Dinah before her summer vacation. 

7:30 P.M. Uroadway TV Theatre • » 

Hit j)lays in original versions to be superseded only by Dodger 

ball games. Matinees, also Sat.-Sun., 3:00 P.M. 

7:4.'i P.M. Perry Como Show • 2 (M.W.F.} 

The great voice of personable Perry with the Fontane Sisters. 

r:l.» P.M. I'.S.A. Vanteen • 2 (T,Tfc) 

Vi\acious Jane Froman with a bubbling mixture of song and 

dance. 

7:4ii P.M. KewH Caravan • 4 & O 

John Cameron Swayze's video newsreel of day's headline events. 



Monday P.M. 



7:30 P.M. itoh And Kay • 4 

Mavhem reigns as B&R perform in pin-pricking satire. 
R:tm P.M. iturns And Allen Show • 2 
Daffy doings by Gracie and George that make for great laughs. 
tt:00 P.M. I'm The Law • n 

(ieorge Raft, tough as they come, in slam-bang adventure. 
tt:00 P.M. Homicide Squad • 7 

it's murder and Tom Conway detects the way to the culprit. 
tt:30 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 
Lively talent showcase with Garry Moore subbing for Arthur. 
U:30 P.M. Concert Hour • 4 & O 
The great virtuosos of the day in thirty-minute recitals. 
U:tm P.M. I Love Lucy • 2 & H 
Delirious, delightful escapades of Lucille Ball with Desi. 
»:30 P.M. Red Ituttons • 2 & O 
The redhot young comic with his side-splitting skits. 
0:30 P.M. Robert Montgomery Presents • 4 
Fascinating, full-hour storytelling with Robert M., narrator. 
H»:00 P.M. Summer Theatre • 2 & ti 
Studio One with a different name but the same sponsor and inde- 
fatigable Betty Furness serves up light dramas and comedy. 



Tuesday 



7:30 P.M. Beulah • 7 

Tilings go from bad to worse to laughter as Beulah (Louise 

Beavers) plays the Hendersons' rollicking housekeeper. 

tt:30 P.M. Break The Bank • 4 

Beginning June 23rd, Bert Parks plays summer Santa. Circus 

Hour, with Joe E. Brown, from 8:00 P.M., last show June 16th. 

U:30 P.M. Wisdom Of The Ages • S 

Lots of chuckles, too, with five generations represented in the 

panel discussion. Jack Barry in the moderator's chair. 

ihttO P.M. Crime Syndicated • 2 

Dramatic crime exposes. Alternating weekly: City Hospital. 

»:0O P.M. Fireside Theatre • 4 

Expertly woven tales, star cast and filmed in Hollywood. 



R 

M 

79 



I V Pi'09''<>>ii highlights 



9:30 P.31. Suspense • 2 & 6 

Dramatically tense and spellbinding stories of mystery. 
9:30 P.M. Circle Theatre • 4 
Real-life conflicts in drama fitting for the entire family. 
9:30 P.M. The Big issue • 5 

Martha Rountree leads a verbal free-for-all on major problems. 
lOiOO P.M. Danger • 2 

Among the very best of suspense shows. Richard Stark, host. 
lOiOO P.M. Two For The Money • 4 & 6 
Hoosier Herb Shriner gives contestants a chance to win thou- 
sands. 



Wednesday 



7:30 P.M. Date JVith Judy • 7 

The topsy-turvy teen-age world starring pert Mary Linn Beller. 
&'.00 P.M. Godireg And His Friends • 2 & 6 

Guest stars take turns emceeing the big Godfrey variety hour. 

8:00 P.M. I Married Joan • 4 

In this comedy Jim Backus plays the first person and the amusing, 

fast-stepping Joan Davis plays her namesake. 

8:30 P.M. Music Hall • 4 

A happy, tuneful show starring that lady of song, Patti Page. 

Alternate weeks, Cavalcade of America, dramas from history. 

8:30 P.M. China Smith • 7 

Exotic adventure series starring Dan Duryea in title role. 

9iOO P.M. Strike It Rich • 2 & 6 

Warren Hull gives needy contestants a chance at $500 in cash. 

9:00 P.M. Kralt Theatre • 4 

Excellent, satisfying video drama from New York studios. 

9:30 P.M. Man Against Crime • 2 

Rugged adventures of Mike Harnett (Ralph Bellamy). 

10:00 P.M. International Boxing Club • 2 & 6 

Ring gladiators trade punches in blue ribbon events. 

10:00 P.M. This Is Your Life • 4 

Ralph Edwards' unique, emotional drama of a person's life. 



Thursday 



8:00 P.M. Life YTitft Luigi • 2 

Human, humorous story of an Italian immigrant in America. 

8:00 P.M. You Bet Your Life • 4 & 6 

Groucho grapples with contestants and quizzes for cash. 

8:30 P.M. Four Star Playhouse • 2 

Renowned actors of stage and screen in 30-minute teleplays. 

8:30 P.M. Treasury Men In Action • 4 

Walter Greaza starring, T-Men track down lawbreakers. 

8:30 P.M. Chance Of A Lifetime • 7 & 6 

Talent-tested candidates vie. Dennis James, emcee. 

9:00 P.M. Lux Video Theatre • 2 & 6 

Exciting 30-minute dramas featuring big-name stage stars. 

9:00 P.M. Dragnet • 4 

Prize-winning police drama with Jack Webb as Sgt. Joe Friday. 

9:30 P.M. Big Town • 2 

Pat McVey, as Steve Wilson, plays adventure-seeking newsman. 

9:30 P.M. Ford Theatre • 4 & 6 

Enthralling video drama listing stars in original stories. 

lOzOO P.M. My Little Margie • 2 

Comedy series with Gale Storm making things stormy in titl6 role. 

lOiOO P.M. Martin Kane, Private Eye • 4 & 6 

Mystery series with Lee Tracy as genial but deadly "eye." 

I0:30 P.M. Foreign intrigue • 4 (& 6 at llzOO P.M.) 

Well-spun espionage series filmed abroad by Jerome Thor. 



80 



Friday 



7:30 P.M. Stu Erwin Show • 7 

Rib-tickling situations starring Stu and wife June CoUyer. 

H.-OO P.M. Mama • 2 & H 

Charming, delightful series of Norwegian immigrants in Frisco. 

8:00 P.M. Dennis itay Show • 4 

The singing comic plays a good-natured, bumbling bachelor. 

8i30 P.M. My Friend irma • 2 

Marie Wilson as the dazzling, daffy, blonde Auvcibelle. 

8:30 P.M. Life Of Riley • 4 & 8 

Shenanigans in the Riley family starring actor William Bendix. 

9:00 P.M. Schlitz Playhouse Of Stars • 2 

Outstanding drama adapted from the works of top story writers. 



9:00 P.M. Big Story • 4 & 6 

Stories of real reporters and how they come up with scoops. 

9:30 P.M. Our Miss Brooks • 2 

Eve Arden as lovable schoolmarm in humorous adventures. 

9:30 P.M. The Aldrieh Family • 4 & 8 

Bobby Ellis, as Henry, runs his usual, hilarious, hectic course. 

lOzOO P.M. Mr. And Mrs. North • 2 

Stars Barbara Britton-Richard Denning in comedy adventure. 

I0:00 P.M. Cavalcade Of Sports • 4 & 8 

Fisticuffs scheduled by the IBC from nation's top arenas. 

10:00 P.M. Twenty ifuestions • 5 

Jay Jackson moderates this famous radio-TV game starring Fred 

Van Deventer, Florence Rinard, Herb Polesie, John McPhee. 

10:30 P.M. Down You Got • S 

Panel-quiz from Chi. Dr. Bergen Evans, moderator. Panelists: 

Toni Gilman, Carmelita Pope, Robert Breen, Francis Coughlin. 



Saturday 



7:00 P.M. stork Club • 2 

Host Billingsley takes you into his Cub Room to see glamour. 

7:30 P.M. Beat The Clock • 2 

Couples compete against clock to perform tricky parlor stunts. 

7:30 P.M. Ethel And Albert • 4 

The popular, ingratiating domestic comedy that started on radio 

ten years ago with Richard Widmark as Albert. Now Alan Bunce 

in Albert role. Peg Lynch, creator and writer, plays Ethel. 

8:00 P.M. Jackie Gleason Show • 2 

Mr. Saturday Night, himself, switches from clowning to touching 

pantomime for chuckles. Also, guests, June Taylor dancers. 

8:00 P.M. My Hero • 4 & 8 

Robert Cummings as naive but funny realtor in odd situations. 

8:30 P.M. Original Amateur Hour • 4 & 8 

The original talent show that found Frank Sinatra, Vera-EUen, 

Mimi Benzell, others, continues traditionally with Ted Mack. 

9:00 P.M. This Is Show Business • 2 

Superb panel-variety show illustriously headed by Fadiman. 

9:00 P.M. Saturday ISight Revue m 4 & 8 

Hoagy Carmichael, songwriter and film star, is host and star 

of 90-minute variety featuring comic antics of Bobby Sargent. 

9:00 P.M. Boxing With Bill Stern • 7 

Bill, at the mike, roves the country for Ray Arcell promotions, 

9:30 P.M. Meet Millie • 2 

Whacky saga of a steno in Manhattan with Elena Verdugo 

starring. 

9:30 P.M. Wrestling From Chicago • 5 

From the Marigold Gardens, Jack Brickhouse interprets grunts. 



Sunday 



5:00 P.M. Super Circus • 7 

For youth of all ages, dazzling, exciting circus variety. 
6:30 P.M. See It Now • 2 

The highly praised video news magazine with Edward R. Murrow. 
8:30 P.M. KValter Winchell • 7 & 8 
Exciting, dramatic news reports by the world-famous columnist. 
7:00 P.M. Red Skelton Show • 4 & 8 
Comedy-variety with the carrot-topped clown. On film. 
7:30 P.M. Mister Peepers • 4 

Chuckles guaranteed with Wally Cox as shy, modest school- 
teacher. 

8:00 P.M. Toast Of The Town • 2 & 6 
The far-famed, spectacular variety headed by Ed Sullivan. 
9:00 P.M. Fred Waring Show • 2 

The Pennsylvanians inimitable productions of great pop music. 
9:00 P.M. TV Playhouse • 4 

One of the top-flight TV theatres. Live from NYC studios. 
9:00 P.M. Rocky King, Detective • S 
For whodunit fans, followed at 9:30 by The Plainclothes Man. 
9:30 P.M. Ken Murray and Alan Young • 2 
Two laugh-getters alternate until June 25 when Kathryn Murray 
moves in for the summer with variety, The Arthur Murray Party. 
10:00 P.M. ThSb Web • 2 

Spine-tingling suspense with Jonathan Blake as narrator, 
10:30 P.M. What's My Line? • 2 
Guess-your-occupation show, witty and fun, with John Daly, 



Minnie Pearl 



(Continued from, page 41) 
use it; no money, because they don't have 
it. Then I go on. 

"As I made my first appearance this 
night I speak of, 'That,' said my Henry, 
nudging his pal, 'is the girl I'm going to 
marry.' 

"There was a frozen silence. A gulping 
sound. Then my Henry's buddy rallied 
beyond the call of duty. 

" 'I bet,' he said, 'I bet she's a good old 
girl!' " 

But it's Henry who gives the tagline: 

"After the show we went backstage, and 
that boy," Henry laughs, "nearly fainted!" 

Nearly fainted at, y'understand, the sight 
of a lipsticked Miss Minnie Pearl, a stream- 
lined, soft-spoken, smart-appearing Miss 
Minnie Pearl. 

Not that Miss Minnie is what you could 
rightly call a glamour girl. And if you 
did she wouldn't take it as a compliment. 
"I'm country — and proud as a stand of pine 
of it," says Miss Minnie Pearl. 

Miss Minnie is handsome but it's an out- 
door, healthy-looking handsome. She 
stands five foot, seven and one-half in 
her sheer nylons, weighs 135 pounds, has 
reddish brown hair worn in a modest 
horse's tail, hazel eyes that laugh most of 
the time. Miss Minnie is "built," and no 
mistake, and wears clothes beautifully. 

Home to Miss Minnie and her Henry is 
a medium-small, white, one-story house 
they bought, not long ago, on Castleman 
Drive in one of Nashville's loveliest 
suburbs. 

"We're real proud of the place," said 
Miss Minnie, "and of some of the things 
in it. The mirrored what-not, 150 years 
old, that came from my family and the 
cannon-ball mahogany fourposter bed, 200 
years old, that came straight from Henry's 
parents' bedroom to ours. We're real 
proud too of our garden. We have a beau- 
tiful spreading carpet of tulips and daf- 
fodils and jonquils and iris and hyacinths 
that Henry grows, by hand, every one of 
them! 

"We hve rather conservatively, Henry 
and I. We have one girl to do for us. A 
girl from my home town of Centerville. 
Indispensable is the word for Mary, who 
is combination cleaning woman, personal 
maid, secretary and cook — although I cook, 
too. Like to cook. It's my hobby. Fried 
chicken is one of my specialties — wouldn't 
you know?— and salads, and buttermilk 
biscuits which melt, Henry says, before 
he gets them in his mouth! 

"A lot of the Grand Ole Opry boys live 
a ranch-style life, go in for horses and 
cattle and such. We don't. We live a 
typically suburban life. We have a piano 
and when the neighbors come by I play 
and sing. I play by ear. In one key, C. 
I'm using the same technique I used in 
1923! We go fishing occasionally, Henry 
and I, for bass, on the lakes. We take 
drives in the country to get Miss Minnie 
Pearl the white cotton stockings she wears. 
Like to keep up my stock of five pair and 
have to drive 'way into the country, these 
days, to get them. Henry had a flying 
business— flying chartered planes— he sold 
a year ago. Flew Grand Ole Opry people 
around places they wanted to be — Texas, 
Thousand Islands. . . . Now he has a 
Beechcraft which seats three, still flies 
some of the Grand Ole Opry boys around. 
Fhes me, too, let there be anywhere I 
want to go. 

"Real simple is the way we live. The 
way we like to live. I think my extrava- 
gance now, and my only one, is for 
clothes. I don't like jewelry or perfume 
or furs or flowers— unless they're growing. 
We don't have, and don't want, a herd of 



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81 



Cadillacs. But when it comes to clothes — 
the way I put it, I'm a clothesoholic instead 
of an alcoholic!" 

Such is Miss Minnie's love of clothes that 
one of her more rhapsodic utterances con- 
cerns a gray wool suit she bought, not 
long ago, at Neiman-Marcus in Dallas, 
where the wives and daughters of bil- 
lionaire Texans spend big, fat green rolls 
of their men-folks' "oil" money. 

The price of the little gray wool must 
have been astronomical, for Miss Minnie, 
shuddering and rolling her bright eyes, 
cannot bring herself to mention it. 

"It's a throw-back, that suit," she says, 
looking conscience-stricken, "to the days 
at Ward Belmont College during which I 
had no clothes. Or, rather, I had the wrong 
clothes. For, by the time I came to college 
in 1930, we'd lost what little money we had 
and there I was, thrown in with a lot of 
wealthy girls and swank sub-debs from 
all over the country, who lived in man- 
sions — one of them got a black marble 
bathroom for Christmas! — and had trunks 
of real beautiful 'originals' and all, and 
there I sat in clothes from the Centerville 
Emporium . . . and we didn't even have 
a bathroom! My roommate, the first year, 
was a real rich girl from Texas with oil 
connections and charge accounts in shops 
I ,iust couldn't go in! 

"I just didn't have any way to compete 
with these girls. 'What did it do to me? 
Killed me at first," Miss Minnie says, and 
shudders, 'then I decided you go so far 
down, you can't get further than down. 
No way to go from the bottom, is what I 
mean, but up! 

"Of course, I know now that's why I 
started playing comedy. Started kidding 
everywhere, and everything — my clothes, 
not having any money or any know-how. 
Had to, in order to live. Kidded my ap- 
pearance, too, for I wasn't pretty, either. 
Never have been pretty. That's why I 
went in for comedy, too. Talked fast, 
laughed loud, clowned around to divert 
a man from looking at my face! 

"Another thing I know, however, is 
that I didn't need to knock myself out the 
way I did. At a college reunion soon after 
graduation, the girls said: 'Ophie, we were 
never conscious of the fact that you didn't 
have as many clothes as we did!' 

"Like having a fever blister — you're the 
one conscious of it and suffering embar- 
rassment. No one else notices. Should be 
a lesson, what I'm saying, to other girls 
who, like me, haven't got the clothes or 
the looks. But it won't be. Nothing is a 
lesson," says Miss Minnie Pearl, "until 
it is too late. 

"Ward Belmont had a lot to do," she 
adds, "with people expecting me not to 
be so 'country.' But I am country and, as 
I've said, proud as a stand of pine of it. 

"I come from the country, from Cen- 
terville, a farming community, a rural 
community right here in Tennessee — and 
more rural when I lived there than it is 
now. Centerville's in Hickman County, a 
rough country and virgin timberland, which 
was why my dad, a lumberman, went 
there. Settled there. Reared his family 
there. 

"I had the happiest childhood anyone 
ever had! My mother and father saw to 
it that we never felt any insecurity. They 
loved each other, too. And loved us kids, 
my sisters Frances, Virginia, Mary, Dixie 
and me. 

"We never felt any sense of inferiority 
when we were kids, because we had any- 
thing anyone in Centerville had. They 
didn't have much, but we had everything 
P they had . . . and there was fun and laugh- 
^ ter all the time in our big, old rambling- 
all-over-the-hill house overlooking Duck 
River. It looked right straight across at 
Grinder's Switch, too same old Grin- 

oZ 



der's Switch I allude to, time and again, 
on Grand Ole Opry. One of the biggest 
events of the day back in Centerville was 
when Daddy would load up the wagons 
with logs. The teamsters, Jake and Tom 
and Matt, would lend a hand and he'd drive 
up to Grinder's Switch, taking us kids 
along with him. We'd leave home riding 
high on top of the lumber. 'Now don't 
you move,' Mother'd say, 'until you get to 
the Switch!' But we had it fixed with the 
teamsters to let us ride, soon as we're out 
of sight, on the tongue of the wagon. No 
danger in riding the tongue. What Mother 
feared was, we'd scrape our shoe leather in 
the dust 

"Time I was old enough to talk, 'I want 
to be in show business,' I'd say, and keep 
saying, 'I'm going to be in show business.' 
And I started playing piano as a little 
girl. Pick out war songs, I would, like 
'Over There' and 'If He Can Fight Like 
He Can Love.' 

"Where I got the idea of going into 
show business, I'll never know, no one in 
our family having heard tell of show busi- 
ness hardly, let alone being in it. Likely 
I got it from the movies — for, when I was 
about seven or eight, we had an old 
silent-movie house in our town and it was 
my mecca. I'd get Mama to give rne a 
dime; then I'd go up the road and make 
a deal with the manager: If he'd let me 
in free, I'd play the piano. I played the 
piano. I played 'Pony Boy', 'Hearts and 
Flowers' and such. It's why I haven't any 
eyes today. Piano way down front, in the 
dark, and had to watch the movie as well 
as the keys so I could tell Mama what I'd 
seen. Hard on my neck, which had a 
permanent crick in it for years, as well 
as on my eyes. 

"Maybe it was the movies influenced my 
wanting to be in show business. But I 
think I just wanted to play-act and, par- 
ticularly," Miss Minnie laughs her ring- 
ing laugh, "I wanted to show off! 

"Because I was the youngest of the five 
girls — seven years younger than Dixie, the 
next to youngest — they all spoiled me. All 
except my father who only spoiled me 
for anything that isn't honest and real and 
good and fine. 

"He was the greatest thing in my life, 
my father. He had the sense of humor 
that went with the hills. And the love of 
the things that matter. He loved wood. 
Loved the feel of wood, good wood. He 
taught me to know every kind of wood 
and to respect it. Now, when I see people 
paint good wood, it hurts me. Our house, 
now, is modern and functional and we love 
it. But our dream is to have a house all 
paneled walls and naked, lovely floors 
with hooked rugs on them, a house that 
rambles all over the hills the way our 
tumbledown old house did down home in 



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Centerville. That would be just perfect. 

"Today, John Wayne and Gary Cooper 
remind me of my father, as a young man. 
When he died, he seemed to me a com- 
bination of Will Rogers and Abraham 
Lincoln. After he died, a, friend wrote: 
'Somehow I can't be too grieved at Mr. 
Colley's going. Can't think of his death 
but only that he reminds me of the tall 
trees on the other side of the hill.' 

"That's what he reminds me of, too; 
that's the way I think of him — as of the 
tall trees on the other side of the hill." 

During college, Ophie, a natural-born 
"play actress," play-acted in school dra- 
matics. After college, she had two years' 
teaching experience in Centerville. "Mama 
made me stay at home," says Miss Minnie, 
"until I was twenty-one. Expression is 
what I taught in Centerville, all the time 
frothing at the mouth, wanting to get 
away, get away, see the world. . . . 

"In the fall after I was twenty-one, 1 
joined the Wayne P. Sewell Producing 
Company of Atlanta, which traveled aL 
over the South giving dramatic readings 
and coaching home talent in their own 
local productions. I was directing, work- 
ing mostly in the schools. This was six 
years of my life. At the time. I thought it 
was the hardest six years. But there was 
pay-dirt in 'em, for it was during them 
that I conceived and finally crystallized 
Miss Minnie Pearl. 

"In Alabama in 1936, I ran upon a lovely 
lady, lived in her home with her. She was 
the greatest. A woman of the hills. The 
soul of hospitality. She had sixteen chil- 
dren spaced so as to be born in February 
or March so that, come spring, she would 
be up and about working in the fields. Her 
proudest and only boast was that she 
never failed to 'make the crop.' One of 
my proudest boasts is that when I said 
goodbye to Alabama, she said, 'Lord, I 
hate you to leave. You're just like one 
of us!' She didn't suggest Minnie Pearl to 
me, this woman whose heart was bigger 
than the hills she loved, she was Minnie 
Pearl. 

"From 1936 to 1940, I developed this 
character, this act. Transcriptions of my 
first programs sound all gentle and sweet — 
like her. Since then, I've been forced into 
the raucous. For the reason that when 
you're on a coast-to-coast show, you must 
get laughs instead of chuckles." 

It was while playing an engagement in 
Aiken, South Carolina, in 1938, that the 
character of Minnie Pearl was first put on 
the stage. At a banquet at the Highland 
Park Hotel, Miss Minnie Pearl made her 
debut and from that time, she just 
"growed" until, in 1940, "I got on Grand 
Ole Opry," says Miss Minnie, "and mv 
familiar opening line, 'Howdy! I'm just 
so proud to be here,' is true, every syllable 
of it!" 

It was in 1946 that Miss Minnie Pearl 
met Mr. Henry Cannon. "Right here in 
Nashville," say Miss Minnie, "at the home 
of a mutual friend. But, with him in the 
flying business and me in show business, 
there was no way, you'd think, of our 
getting together. What was worse, our 
friends had told him about me and me 
about him, with the result that we were 
determined not to like each other. We 
didn't, either, so's you could notice it. 
From June, when we met, until December, 
we saw each other just casually. He was 
dating other people and so was I." 

Then one night, in a parked car, Mr. 
Henry Cannon kissed Miss Minnie Pearl. 

Two months after that first kiss, Miss 
Minnie and her Mr. Henry Cannon were 
married. A church wedding, with Miss 
Minnie Pearl in white linen and flowers 
that Henry had grown as her bridal bou- 
quet. And they've lived — they are living — 
"right happily" ever after. . . . 



Today's Bachelor 

{Continued from page 62) 

Sometimes you'll turn on the set, and 
there's Garroway discussing life with a 
year-old chimpanzee named J. Fred Muggs. 
Muggs wears suits that cost forty dollars, 
is owned by two gu^'s in Jersey who daily 
deliver him to NBC in a car with his pic- 
ture on it. Tell Garroway you think Muggs 
is cute, and he nods knowingly. "Till he 
bites through your skin." Then he re- 
flects a minute. "Of course, he's just teeth- 
ing. When he grows up so he can break 
your arm, he won't bite any more." NBC 
viewers are cordially invited to join 
Muggs 's fan club. 

If you've witnessed any of the afore- 
mentioned, then obviously you're one of 
several million people ambitious enough to 
get up at seven o'clock in the morning, 
stagger over to the television set, and 
welcome the dawn with a program called 
Today, master-of-ceremonied by D. GaiTo- 
way, him of the heavy glasses, the easy 
smile, and the friendly manner which 
caused a lady to send him seven dollars 
recently (For what? For nothing. She 
liked him, that's all.) 

Today can be enjoyed on various levels. 
It presents straightforward news broad- 
casts, shows newsreel films from all over 
the world, gives weather reports, teaches 
judo, displays 30-carat diamonds on the 
admirable bosom of Denise Darcel, and 
emanates from a set in which there are 
so many clocks that you can tell what 
time it is at any moment in any place, if 
that's your idea of fun. Over all presides 
Garroway, a boy from Schenectady who 
made very, very good. 

Dave was born in Schenectady, in 1913, 
with what's referred to as "a scientific 
turn of mind." (It's referred to that way 
by fond parents. Neighbors simply cry, 
'That brat's making smells in the cellar 
again.") 

When the small Garroway wasn't invent- 
ing smelly bombs in the basement, he was 
taking things apart for the pure delight it 
gave him to put them together again. He 
once took the grand piano apart, depress- 
ing his mother considerably. She had 
hoped he'd play on it, not in it. 

At sixteen, his mechanical frenzy was 
still fresh and vmsullied. He owned a 
Model T Ford with another boy. The 
other boy, poor fellow, just wanted to 
drive the thing, and when he'd come to 
pick it up from his partner Dave — pick it 
up was just about the story. It'd be lying 
around on the garage floor in pieces. 

In his spare time, Dave built three tele- 
scopes, went to college in St. Louis, got a 
degree, and ended up selling piston rings 
in Boston, where his family was living at 
the time. There appeared to be virtually 
no demand for piston rings in Boston. In 
fact, there appeared to be virtually no 
demand for Dave in Boston. New York, 
he figured, was the place. 

They hired him in New York, okay. At 
NBC, as a page boy. He planned to work 
himself up to being an announcer. The 
page boys were all given a chance to go 
to a class for announcer-training. Dave 
stayed up nights recording his voice and 
practicing diction. Then came audition 
time. He placed twenty-third in the class 
of twenty-four. It would have soured a 
lesser man. It merely spurred Dave on. 
If you can use the word "spurred" in 
connection with an art so apparently easy- 
going as Garroway's. 

He became an announcer in Pittsburgh, 

got some invaluable experience, and in 

1940 came to Chicago, where he went to 

work for NBC. 

; In 1942, he joined the Navy. Four months 

fc he was at sea, and every day of every 

Imonth, he was seasick. They wouldn't 




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83 



have had to camouflage him to fool the 
enemy; he was green as the water around 
him. 

They finally took him (with a ruptured 
stomach) off the boat at Pearl Harbor, and 
he lay in a hospital, inhaling deeply, and 
looking at the doctor out of great, wise 
eyes. The doctors wrote on his medical 
record, "Don't send this one to sea. He's 
not much good." And, after his stomach 
had healed, Dave found himself in charge 
of a school for yeomen, in Hawaii. 

After the war, he drifted back to Chicago 
and got himself a disc jockey show. It was 
a job none of the other announcers wanted, 
because it was in the middle of the night. 

It was perfect for Garroway. He figured 
he didn't have to please all of the people 
all of the time, because most of the people 
were fast asleep. The few people he did 
reach he was going to treat as intelligent 
human beings. He wouldn't patronize 'em, 
he wouldn't play music he himself had no 
respect for. 

A Guy Lombardo fan once registered an 
indignant protest over Garroway's sneering 
at Guy Lombardo. Next night, Garroway 
gleefully employed sound effects to convey 
to the fan that he — Garroway — was break- 
ing up Lombardo records. 

A real jazz maniac himself, Dave admits 
that, when on the topic of one of his own 
favorites, he gets lost in his enthusiasm. 
He once described Ella Fitzgerald's style 
like this: "Her voice sounds as though she 
were singing through a lace handker- 
chief" — and then proceeded to embroider 
on the idea. 

Besides music, and musical talk, Dave 
used to ramble on about various topics 
which popped into his head. "Love, death, 
art, books, poetry, cats, and taxicabs — " to 
quote from an NBC biography. 

1949 was the big year, though. In 1949, 
Dave became the most talked-about man 
in Chicago television. Because of the Gar- 
roway At Large show. It was half an hour, 
once a week. It became famous, and took 
Dave with it. For the first time, television 
was being used as television. Instead of the 
kind of show where the technician was 
bawled out if so much as a cable got into 
the picture, Dave wandered at random 
through all the trappings of the studio, and 
let the home viewers see what he saw. In- 
stead of aiming at howls of laughter from 
a studio audience, Dave aimed at giving 
a couple of people in a living room a grin,' 



a story to tell the next day, a few minutes 
of good music. ... 

He'd come on by saying, "Hi there, old 
tiger," or "old fluorescent," or old any- 
thing-he-could-think-of, and then maybe 
you'd see him walking along talking about 
New York, for instance, and what a funny 
town it was. How it could be cold and 
hard sometimes, and sometimes very 
beautiful. Now take fall in New York . . . 
and his voice would go on, and you'd find 
out later that he'd been quoting from 
some writer, Wolfe, perhaps, or Dos Passos 
. . . and then you'd see a girl singer sitting 
on a bench under a replica of New York's 
Washington Square, and she wouldn't be 
staring straight into the camera, she'd be 
half -turned away, with a few leaves falling 
gently down around her, and after a min- 
ute she'd start to sing "Autumn in New 
York." 

That was the kind of show it was. In a 
medium used to Milton Berle, it took 
people's breath away. Or rather, it gave 
people back their breath, and the time to 
breathe with it. It didn't sock you with 
anything; once there were actually two full 
minutes of silence! The cameras followed 
members of the cast around for two min- 
utes without a word from anybody, and it 
was the first time that had ever happened 
on television. 

Colleen Hoefer, who used to do publicity 
for Dave, thinks the fact that his show 
didn't have money to burn was partly re- 
sponsible for how good it was. Which 
sounds like a direct contradiction, but 
isn't. New York always had the big money 
and backers; in Chicago, television de- 
pended more on ingenuity and imagination. 
(Kukla, Fran And Ollie also comes from 
there.) 

"Look at it this way," Colleen says. "If 
you've got a forty-thousand-dollar budget 
for a show, and you've got five minutes 
with nothing happening, you're scared to 
death. What'U you do with the five min- 
utes? You end up by rushing out and buy- 
ing twenty dancing girls! We didn't have 
that kind of money, so Dave substituted 
taste and sensitivity. Maybe if we'd had 
money, the show wouldn't have been so 
simple, and so good — " 

So many fans still mourn the show's 
passing that even now, with Dave up to his 
ears in morning television, to say nothing 
of afternoon radio, rumors about a resur- 
rection of Garroway At Large persist 



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84 



around the NBC studios and offices. 

Chicago's loss being New York's gain, 
Dave currently lives in a Park Avenue 
penthouse apartment which he says is 
"real good." It's got four terraces facing 
four directions, and was originally four 
and a half rooms, but Dave had the walls 
torn out. It's one huge room now — 
"modern, I guess" — and it's got the only 
fireplace in the building. The apartment 
was originally built for Merlin Aylesworth, 
the first president of NBC. Aylesworth 
wanted a fireplace, and had one put in. 

"When he lived here," Dave says, "I 
was a page boy at NBC at sixty-five a 
month." He throws the next line away. 
"This place costs over sixty-five a month." 

Jazz-happy as ever, Dave's wakened at 
four every morning by the radio — turned 
on automatically via one of those clock- 
timer-gadgets — and he lies in bed until 
four-thirty absorbing the music played 
by a disc jockey named Bob Garrity. "For 
some reason, I hear real good that half- 
hour. I'm only part-awake, but the music 
breaks through the barriers. All day long, 
those first few phrases I hear run through 
my head — " 

Dave can, and does, occasionally sit in on 
drums, if he hears a record he feels like 
accompanying. 

Ask him if he's got a set of drums at 
home, and he looks impish. "Doesn't every- 
body?" 

Recently he took a brief vacation, and 
went to Florida. But — "I got bored sick, 
and came back." The one kick he did get 
out of the Florida trip was fooling aroimd 
with something called an aqualung. It's an 
underwater diving outfit which doesn't 
have any cable or hose, so you're a free 
agent. You can go down to 150 feet, and 
stay there for an hour and a half. 

"Out in the Gulf Stream," Dave says, 
"the current's so swift you have to swim 
all the time just to keep from being swept 
up to Canada, but I walked around on the 
bottom and speared a couple of surprised- 
looking fish." 

Better than fishing or drumming, Dave 
loves racing cars. He's got an S.S. 100 
Jaguar — whatever that is — which is sixteen 
years old, and has won innumerable beauty 
contests. (Races, it hasn't won.) 

Dave's interested in microscopy — shades 
of his scientific boyhood — and is also mad 
about those three-dimensional stereo- 
realist cameras and pictures. 

"I went to the eye doctor a while ago," 
he told a friend the other day, "and he — 
the doctor — held up a stereoscope. For 
two years I'd been staring into a stereo- 
scope day and night. So he — the doctor — 
said, 'I wish you'd get interested in one of 
these things. It would strengthen the 
muscles in your eye.' " 

Occasionally a Garroway aide will at- 
tempt to tell a probing writer that Dave 
has odd eating habits. "Yes," Dave wUl 
say. "I eat through my mouth." But the 
fact is, he has got odd eating habits. Unless 
you figure carrot juice, celery iuice, and 
three molasses cookies (containing exactly 
thirteen calories each) is the normal busi- 
ness man's lunch. 

Probing writers attempting to find out 
about Dave's dating habits fare even more 
sketchily. He often takes a pretty girl to 
dinner, but he can't ever stay out late 
because of his early rising hour. "If I'm 
feeling really reckless, I can tear around 
till ten o'clock," he once announced. 

He owns twenty-eight pairs of hand- 
knitted socks, but they all came from Betty 
Furness, who just likes to knit socks for 
people. 

Fortunately, he's got a maid (who also 
came from Betty Furness) who likes to 
wash socks for people. 

Garroway is a contented man. 



i 



Her Heart Holds a Song 

{Continued from page 34) 
of people I can sing to every morning, Mon- 
day through Friday. And I'm learning so 
much. And there's so much I want to 
learn. I'm taking dancing and singing 
and dramatic lessons each week. And then 
there's the apartment to finish. . . ." 

The apartment, essentially, symbolizes 
the cl-ux of the conflict, for Peggy, talented 
though she may be, also feels that deep 
womanly yearning for a home. 

Because she also has a clear mind and 
a wisdom beyond her years, she recog- 
nizes it and discusses it frankly. 

She'll tell you, "Just when I quit teach- 
ing school and began singing with a band, 
Dorothy Shay warned me I'd sometime 
have to make a choice. . . ." 

The choice was a simple one — remain 
a schoolteacher, marry and raise a family 
quietly, calmly — or become a career girl 
in show business, with its constant de- 
mands on time, energy and interest and 
its crazy hours. A few women achieve 
both. But, for every success, there are 
a score of casualties. 

It was this choice which Dorothy Shay, 
whose name already was in lights, 
summed up for eager and aspiring Peggy a 
few years ago. Dorothy had chosen one 
course, she said, but what's advisable for 
one woman doesn't always apply to the 
next. E^ch girl must make her own de- 
cision. 

But, in this golden year for Peggy, the 
decision, although it lies inevitably ahead, 
can be postponed — deliciously. 

That's exactly what Peggy Taylor is 
doing at present, and her associates at 
Breakfast Club have recognized and re- 
spected her state of mind — even to the 
point of discarding a venerated Breakfast 
Club gag. 

It happened officially, the morning Far- 
ley Granger was a guest. Apparently, 
he had not heard that most of the girl 
vocalists on the Breakfast Club have, 
through the years, fallen in love and left 
the show when they married. Apparently, 
too, he had never heard the cast's stock 
joke that their girl singer always is 
hunting for a man. 

Peggy, torn between laughter and em- 
barrassment when she tells of it, says, 
"Honestly, when I started that man-crazy 
routine, you'd have thought, from the look 
on Farley's face, that he had walked right 
into the middle of Sadie Hawkins' Day." 

Funny though it was at first, Mr. Gran- 
ger's discomfort shortly affected the entire 
cast. Says Peggy, "You never saw anyone 
run for the exit so fast. It took a minute for 
me to realize he thought it was real. And 
when I did, I wanted to die." 

Maestro Don McNeill sensed their mu- 
tual discomfort and ruled at the next pro- 
gram-planning meeting: "From now on, 
that man-hunting gag is out. It doesn't fit 
for Peggy." 

For the most part, however, Peggy ad- 
heres to those intrinsic disciplines of show 
business and keeps her moods to herself. 
She says, "That's when I go to the easel 
and just paint them out." 

Peggy originally never expected her 
painting would go beyond a self-expression 
hobby. Two empty picture hooks are evi- 
dence that it was. 

She points to them proudly. "I can't bear 
to take them down," she confesses. "I'm so 
proud. I used to have two paintings hang- 
ing there, which I worked on during the 
holidays. The paintings didn't turn out at 
all the way I had planned them. But they 
suited me, so I hung them up. Then in 
came a friend of mine, and she fell in love 
with them. She bought them right off the 
wall." (Continued on page 86) 



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85 



Already Peggy is planning replacements, 
for the wall is part of the setting which she 
designed for herself. 

Camellia-skinned, dark-eyed Peggy loves 
to wear bright colors when she's at home. 
■"Combine Irish ancestry with Spanish, and 
the result is a taste for the brilliant," she 
explains. 

Brilliance, her artistic taste dictates, must 
be concentrated, rather than splashed. Her 
new apartment, a block off one of Chi- 
cago's busiest and most fashionable streets, 
has a wide picture window to bring in a 
view of Lake Michigan. Drapes with a 
modern pattern frame it. Walls are light 
gray and charcoal gray. Cabinets are gray 
to blend with the wall, chairs are white and 
gold, the sofa is covered with a tapestry 
of red and gold, and wrought iron and 
glass tables and lamps have both sparkle 
and contrast. Her dishes are white pottery. 

The living room is planned for comfort 
and leisure, but the room adjoining — 
Peggy's office — is austere. On one side, 
desk, bookcases and record player are 
lined up; on the other are her piano and 
fites. 

"I've learned more about singing since 
I've been on Breakfast Club than I've ever 
known before," says Peggy. "Johnny and 
Ruth Desmond have helped me so much. 
From them I've learned how to study a 
song, how to get the most out of it in emo- 
tion and in meaning. Now, I have record- 
ings made of my songs almost every day 
and I sit in the evening, play them over 
and over, and try to think of ways I could 
have done them better." 

Among all the lovely things with which 
she has surrounded herself, perhaps the 
most important feature is that prosaic, 
standard bit of equipment, the telephone. 

"It rings," says Peggy with a happy 



smile. "There isn't any particular boy 
friend at the moment — at least not in Chi- 
cago — but, thank goodness, several nice 
young men like to take me out to dinner 
and a play or a movie. And when they don't 
— well, I spend the evening at home with 
Freddie." 

Freddie is a small, sausage-shaped, 
brown-marked black Dachshund with a 
wag which starts at the tip of his nose and 
undulates to the tip of his tail. 

Freddie is also a mischief. The entire air 
audience found that out when, at the top 
popularity of the song, "Doggie in the Win- 
dow," some one conceived the bright idea 
that Peggy should bring Freddie down to 
the show the morning she was to sing the 
song. 

Freddie, at the outset, behaved like a 
perfect little gentleman. Trusting Peggy 
unsnapped the leash. Making the rounds 
of the cast, Freddie turned worshipful li- 
quid eyes upward, begging for those pats 
on the head a good dog may expect. 

When Sam Cowling, in his customary 
manner, sat down on the edge of the stage, 
Freddie was happy. While Don McNeill had 
to bend down six feet to pat Freddie, Sam, 
seated, could reach out, tug Freddie's ears 
and frequently say, "Good dog." 

Freddie, somehow, did not comprehend 
Sam also had a job to do — the serious job 
of making people laugh. It may have been 
that Freddie considered that Sam had taken 
him into partnership in this project. Or he 
may have wanted to provoke some laughs 
of his own. 

With deceptive docility, Freddie made 
no commotion. Then Sam went into his 
own customary routine, pulled a shoe off, 
pantomiming that his feet hurt. 

That was supposed to be the end of the 
joke, period. 



Freddie decided it was the beginning. 
Snatching the shoe, he took ofi down the 
aisle. 

Sam yelled, "Hey, give it back." 

It looked so simple to catch up with a little 
dog running away with a shoe almost as 
big as he was. When Freddie tripped, Sam 
dived. Freddie, still holding the shoe, 
frisked away. Sam, minus shoe, fell flat on 
his face. 

In all the years that sharp-witted Sam 
Cowling has been on Breakfast Clute, this 
probably was the first time he has ever 
been upstaged. At the sight of his for-real 
chagrin, McNeill, who has played straight 
man for a million laughs credited to Sam, 
doubled up, helpless with laughter. So did 
everyone else, including the blushing 
Peggy. 

But Sam, after the show, had a com- 
ment. A shrewd observer of the foibles of 
the human race, Sam has always taken a 
big-brother attitude toward the Breakfast 
Club's pretty girl singers. Like a big 
brother, he also combines a bit of advice 
with his teasing. 

"No kidding," he told Peggy, "You've got 
to watch out for such stuflE. How do you 
ever expect a guy to propose to you if, 
when he gets into a romantic mood, that 
clown of a dog upstages him?" 

Peggy's dark eyes twinkled. "Perhaps,' 
she said, "that's the way I want it to be, for 
the present." 

Her qualifying "for the present" is the 
k^y. She doesn't have to make up her mind 
just yet. Peggy, who by the dictates of her 
church and her own personal preference 
regards marriage as a lifetime partner- 
ship, will take her time to make up her 
mind. For this is Peggy's golden year, and 
she's living it with her heart holding onlj 
a song. 




Arthur Godfrey's Fateful Hours 



(Continued from page 46) 
upward from groping obscurity to national 
fame replete with prestige and princely 
riches ... to success and rewards never 
dreamed of in even the wildest imaginings 
of Horatio Alger. 

But this present-day glory of Godfrey's 
is all the more amazing when you analyze 
the background of both headlines. Both 
strongly suggest the antiseptic smell of 
hospital . . . the soft, efficient swish of 
swift-moving nurses' footsteps on linoleum 
floors . . . the presence of pain. The pres- 
ence of hope, too — hope growing or dwin- 
dling, depending on which part of Arthur's 
life-road is under scrutiny. 

Spin back the wheel of time. Return to 
a fine September day in the year 1931. The 
scene: countryside not far from Washing- 
ton, D. C. The peaceful Potomac mirrors 
the blue of Indian summer sky, glints the 
gold of afternoon sun. The uncrowded 
highway is a slate-gray ribbon curving, 
dipping, rising. Twenty-eight-year-old 
Arthur Godfrey is at the wheel of a snappy 
new roadster. On Arthur's lips, a serene 
smile. In his mind, serene thoughts. 

Somewhere, not far distant from him in 
that calm countryside, another vehicle is 
on the highway — a heavy, freight-hauling 
vehicle being driven by another young 
man. Neither driver is aware of the other's 
existence . . . but Fate has worked out a 
timetable for that. 

Not gifted with the power of foretelling 

future events, Arthur believes that the 

horn of plenty has indeed been bestowed 

„ upon him. Motoring along the road that 

^ sunny afternoon, his mood is one of utmost 

contentment. 

The Godfrey life pattern had undergone 
a drastic change some eighteen months 
on 



prior to that sunny afternoon. Eighteen 
months back, it was Radioman First Class 
Godfrey, U. S. Coast Guard. Even that 
status was the culmination of a haphazard, 
rag-tag-and-bobtail existence. 

Arthur signed up with the Coast Guard 
after trying well-nigh everything else: as 
an architect's office boy, migratory worker, 
dishwasher, assembly line auto paint 
sprayer, short-order cook, salesman of 
cemetery lots, vaudevillian, and Navy gob. 

One night, in 1930, a couple of Coast 
Guard buddies persuaded Arthur to take 
part in an amateur "talent" contest broad- 
cast by Radio Station WFBR in nearby Bal- 
timore. The station's program manager 
was pleased with Arthur's vocal and in- 
strumental effort but, more important, he 
was impressed with the special quality of 
Arthur's speaking voice. 

Result: The Coast Guard's loss was 
radio's gain. 

"Red" Godfrey, The Warbling Banjoist, 
became an overnight WFBR drawing card. 
Baltimorians evinced a hearty appetite for 
him and Arthur was served up in other 
ear-pleasing forms — "Red" Godfrey's Me- 
lodians. Morning Air Mail, announcing 
chores and what-not. 

At the end of a year with WFBR, a grand 
total of twelve thousand fan letters! This 
was seductive music to the ears of officials 
in certain Washington radio stations. One 
station, WRC, came forward to woo the 
Baltimore oriole. Arthur was woo-able. 

Such were the ego-flattering events 
which passed in pleasant review before 
Arthur's mind's-eye as he drove through 
the countryside that sunny afternoon in 
September of the year 1931. 

How could he know that, even at that 
instant. Fate was consulting her time- 



table? How could he know that, not far 
oiT now, on some converging highway, 
another driver was careening along, per- 
haps equally wrapped in self-absorbing 
thoughts? - 

Blithely, Arthur cocked a blue eye heav- 
enward. Clear sky ... a lively breeze 
aloft. Perfect weather for the afternoon's 
planned activity: lessons in the art of 
gliding. Yes, now that he had the where- 
withal, flying was his new love. Free 
flight, high aloft. It was the very essence 
of freedom ... a long-desired realization. 

Yes, today was a promising holiday from 
the microphones at Radio Station WRC. 
Onward to the airport. Onward to — 

The on-rushing truck veered crazily. No 
escape. A grinding, exploding crash — 
searing pain — and then . . . nothingness. 

Hospital charts: cryptic, coldly techni- 
cal things. But, to the layman, the chart 
over Arthur's bed at Takoma Park Sani- 
tarium could be translated into the follow- 
ing grim information: Laceration of the 
left arm, left hand, left leg and left side 
of the head. Fractured pelvis. Fracture! 
of both kneecaps. Dislocation of the right 
hip. 

How much smashing can the human 
body take? How much shock can it stand? 

Days of coma and unconsciousness. Be- 
nign, blessed unconsciousness of the frantic 
— coldly, measuredly frantic — hands racing 
against time . . . working skilled wonders 
with anaesthetic, scalpel, suture, needle. 

Days of coma and unconsciousness. Be- 
some reluctant befogged dawn, the slow 
emergence into a sense of lessening pain . . . 
of healing. 

But it had been and was a shattering 
experience. In the midst of such physical 
devastation, how could the spirit survive? 



On ' 



what could the spirit be nourished? 

It could be nourished by human warmth. 
By the hundreds and by the thousands, 
the people avalanched Arthur with written 
words of compassion, with spoken words 
of courage and comfort and hope left at 
the hospital switchboard. From all the 
region 'round, the words of encourage- 
ment seemed to merge into an almost tan- 
gible mandate which said, "Get well — we 
want you back with us." 

And as the days and weeks and months 
saw Arthur's pain subside, like receding 
waters after an angry flood, so, gradually, 
did time witness his growing awareness 
of — and response to — the people's desire 
to hear his voice again in their homes. 

Arthur "came back" — on crutches, at 
first, these eventually to be replaced by a 
stout cane. Finally, he limped about with- 
out such props. The limp could not be 
hidden but he did make Spartan efforts to 
conceal the frequent, singeing flashes of 
persistent pain. 

Arthur came back to WRC, his audience 
larger and more loyal than ever. The 
multitude of listeners heard his earthy 
chuckle radiate from WMAL, also — another 
Washington affiliate of NBC. Yes, Arthiu- 
was back, more solidly entrenched than 
ever as a local personsJity. 

Then, one work-weary day, he clashed 
with a station official. Result: Something 
exploded back in his face — his job. 

Again Washington and environs were 
deprived of the redhead's baritone bufoon- 
ery. Public and press took up the cry: 
"Where is Godfrey? We want Godfrey!" 

Destiny ^ . Lady Luck . . . whatever 
her name, this time it was as if she were 
determined to be contrite, to make amends. 
Details aside, the aftermath of that spUt 
with WRC brassdom was Arthur's ascend- 
ency from a local radio personality to a 
nationwide, network name. And the net- 
work was CBS. where he has remained 
ever since. 

The road, since that first important 
"milestone," has stretched out long and 
interestingly. In his steady progress for- 
ward, Arthur has assumed the proportions 
of a national institution. He has acquired 
enormous rewards in the material sense. 
He has been a prize plum on the CBS tree 
for, lo, these nineteen years. Fame. Wealth. 
Professional prestige. Motor cars. Private 
planes. Town penthouses. A country estate. 

But these do not properly inventory 
Arthur's real wealth. The things that do 
count — the things that are real — are the 
affection and esteem he has garnered from 
his family and from the vast mxiltitude of 
Americans who, by way of radio or televi- 
sion, have hung up a permanent welcome 
sign for Arthur on their thresholds. 

And now, coming into view, is the sec- 
ond closely related "milestone." The span 
between this one and the first is not visible. 
You can't see pain. You just feel it, or 
remember it. Or are haunted by it. 

Surgeon For Godfrey 
Is Top Bone Expert 

The one-time "local radio character" is 
now national front-page news. Why? Be- 
cause all America is avidly interested in 
this especially personal problem of Ar- 
thur's. Americans up and down the land 
know — by way of daily bulletins — exactly 
how Arthur fares at the hands of the ex- 
pert bone surgeon and his colleagues at 
Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Once again Arthur Godfrey is being 
nourished by the warmth of the expressed 
love of those who may never have seen 
him closer than their television screen, or 
heard his voice, except over a microphone. 
Arthur Godfrey's fateful hours are passing 
and the headlines of yesterday and today 
mirror one man's fighting courage. 




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87 



(Continued irom page 39) 
interview with the nice things, the ad- 
miring and loving things, she said about 
"Daddy" or — her other pet name for Red 
— "Sweet Boy." So what, I wondered, not 
without half a dozen good reasons, did 
Red have to look so '"moany" about? 

With the next sentence he spoke, the 
answer was given. "The kids are away," 
he said, in the voice of doom. "Two of 
them, the two older ones, are in boarding 
school. The David Lipscom College right 
here in Nashville. The littlest one is with 
my parents in my home town of Berea, 
Kentucky. Real fortunate," Red said 
gratefully, ''that my parents are still liv- 
ing. But I sure do miss the kids. That's 
why the radio's going. Goes all the time. 
That's the extent of the liveliness around 
here without the kids. Lonesomest feel- 
ing in the world." 

Red Foley is the dean of the 150 en- 
tertainers who make up the giant Grand 
Ole Opry production every Saturday night, 
from 7:30 P. M. until midnight, in Nash- 
ville Ryman Auditorium. He's the star 
among stars of the portion of Grand Ole 
Opry heard at 9:30, every Saturday night, 
over NBC Radio. You know his records. 
His record-breaking records. Among them, 
"Chattanooga Shoe Shine Boy," "Tennes- 
see Hillbilly Ghost," "Oceans of Tears" 
and (Red's favorite of all his waxings) 
"Peace in the Valley." You may have 
seen him, in the flesh, when he's made 
personal appearances throughout the coun- 
try. Or in the shadow on the screen in, 
for instance, "The Pioneers." He's def- 
initely a well-known man about America. 
Let the telephone ring at the Foleys and, 
could be, it's Governor Frank Clement 
calling Red, wanting to ask this or that 
question. 

"Everyone admires him," Sally told me, 
"famous folk like the Governor and Bing 
Crosby and Dizzy Dean and Red Skelton, 
with whom he's worked — and he just sits 
and gapes at them! Time he got the mes- 
sage the Governor called, he said 'Wonder 
who's kidding me?' Didn't believe it was 
the Governor, until he dialed the number 
left for him to call, and got — the Governor's 
mansion! Not a showoff bone in the whole 
six-foot-two of him! 

"Should you meet his mother and father, 
you'd see," Sally said, "what Red repre- 
sents. His father walks in like a saint 
walking in. White hair. Straight. His 
mom! Just a Mama. And proud as pea- 
cocks of Red. His dad cries every time 
Red sings an emotional or a religious song. 
'Papa's real proud of what I do,' I've heard 
Red say, pretty proud himself. 'Come into 
the store, whoever you are, he'll sit there 
and talk Clyde to you' (Clyde is Red's 
given name) 'until Doomsday.' 

"I just think Red's perfect," Sally went 
on, as Red was called to the telephone. 
"He's a wonderful husband and a wonder- 
ful father. He is just everybody's friend, 
I guess. Everyone, anyone, tells him their 
troubles. A person as important as Daddy 
is, generally doesn't have any time. Daddy 
has time. He always has time. Only fault 
he's got, he does have too big a heart. . . ." 

Red Foley has many titles and wears 
many crowns. He is known throughout 
the U.S.A.— and sizable portions of the 
world beyond— as the ace of American 
folk music. But to home-folks in Nash- 
ville, to his close friends (one of them 
being Miss Minnie Pearl), he's best known 
, as the ever-lovin' "Pappy" of Shirley Lee, 
HI just turned eighteen . . . Julie Ann, four- 
teen . . . and Jennie Lou, eleven "and 
a little better." You can't get more senti- 
mental than Rod is over these three young 

00 



Red Foley's a Family Man 

daughters of his, these three very pretty 
young daughters who are — there is no 
other word for it — Red's heart. 

"It is a beautiful thing," Sally added, 
"when they're all home. It is darn lone- 
some without them. Even the radio going 
has a lonesome sound — just one little old 
radio — for, when they're home, there's TV 
going in this room, the record player in 
that room, four or five radios in four or 
five other rooms! 

"Parties going on, too. All kinds of par- 
ties . . . And most of the time. Slumber 
parties — they're a big favorite — when all 
their girl friends come over, bring their 
own blankets and pillows, sleep on the 
floor all over the house, play records, make 
candy, chatter like a great big old nest 
of magpies! 

"When they date — Shirley and Julie, 
that is, Jennie Lou's too young — they more 
often than not bring their dates home. 
Dance. And Daddy's right in there with 
them. Teaches them how to dance and 
they teach him. ..." 

"Julie's teaching me the Dip," Red 
laughed, making a face — but loving it — 
"Daddy, with his old back, doing the Dip!" 

"Daddy really lives with his children," 
Sally said. "Kind of sweet. He plays golf 
with his children. Bowls with his children. 
Swims with his children. . . ." 

"We're great ones for telling each other 
things that have happened to us, or de- 
scribing things we've seen, when we've 
been apart. Like TV shows, for instance. 
A few nights ago, I fell asleep while Daddy 
was watching a play, a Douglas Fairbanks, 
Jr., production called The Accused. Soon's 
I woke up, he had to tell me the whole 
story, start to finish. The next time Shir- 
ley and Julie were home, he told them the 
whole story, start to finish. . . ." 

"We always have done things together, 
the kids and I," Red said. "When they 
were just so-high, I used to get out and 
play with them in the back yard, baseball, 
Softball and the like. There's a picture of 
them up there on the wall behind you." 
(There were pictures of them on every 
wall, on the desk, atop the bookshelves, 
on the incidental tables.) "See how gay 
they look, not a care in the world; not 
knowing about care. You can't." Red said, 
his brown eyes darkening, "recall that to 
them." 

Red worries about the children. Was 
deeply worried about them, and for them, 
when their mother died and they came 
face to face — and nothing Daddy could do 
about it — with grief and loss. He worried 
about them during his widowerhood when 
he was obliged to leave them at home — 
such times as he was away from home — 
with a housekeeper. And he worried 
when, faced with the prospect of a step- 
mother, they, normally enough — being so 
young — were resentful and rebelled. Were 
going to leave home, the two older girls 
were, "if Daddy married again." During 
this period of adjustment and readjust- 
ment, of storms and tears, their dad, sensi- 
tive to their every frown and smile, suf- 
fered what came near to being nervous 
collapse. 

Now that painful period is over. 

He is, of course, proud of his children, 
Red is. Proud that Shirley, his first-born, 
was chosen Campus Beauty and Most Pop- 
ular Girl on the Campus at David Lipscom. 

"The votes that elected her were for 
members of the whole student body," her 
proud pappy said, "and my girl just a 
little old Freshman, too! 

"I'm proud because they all have tal- 
ent; all have dramatic ability, dancing 
ability, and beautiful singing voices. 
Prouder because they all want to be good 



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little housewives — and that's what theii 
pappy wants for them. Because that'; 
what I want for them, I'm not giving thenfU' 
any training in the dance or in dramatic; 
or such. Only thing they've ever had i; 
piano lessons. Only theatrical experienci 
they've ever had is when, for severa 
years past, they've appeared with me or 
my Christmas-week Grand Ole Opry shov/ 
I've let them appear on Grand Ole Opr; 
because I don't think of Grand Ole Opr; 
as being show business in the true sense 
But just as something that appeals be- 
cause it's of the people, by the people. 

"I want happy marriages," Red Folej 
said, and said it strong, "for my little girls B* 
This above all. I would like for my little 
girls to have the kind of married life 
dreamed about when I was a little boy 
Dreamed over and over again, year in 
year out. And always it was the same: 
There 'd be the little white house with thf|fe 
little green shutters. The little old path 
flowers bordering it, reaching down to the 
little white gate. And I, in the dream 
coming home at evening time, unlatching 
the gate, the kids running out to meet me, 
At the door, there'd be the wife to gree1 
me. I never saw her face. It didn't mat 
ter. The feeling mattered. Inside, there'c 
be a table set and ready, a big table. The 
smell of homemade bread, store-boughter-., 
bread being something country folkl"'?' 
would think shame. We'd sit down, sa> 
grace . . . and the dream would end. The 
happy dream. But only to begin again. . . 

"It won't matter," Red said, "if m> 
little girls marry husbands who don't make 
a lot. I'm not going to use the old 
cliche, 'Money doesn't matter.' Only ii 
doesn't. . . . 

"Not to happiness, that is. We were pooi 
people. Real poor. Make-ends-meet poor 
Little country store that was — and is— 
Papa's business. E. H. Foley's Genera 
Merchandise Store. The store has a pot- 
bellied stove in the center of it. Has every- 
one in the county, with their problems anc 
their pains, gathered 'round that stove' 
feet up. And you can buy anything at E 
H. Foley's, from nutmeg to hay-bailing 
wire. But he doesn't make any money 
Papa doesn't. Just makes a living. Gives 
everyone in the county credit, Papa does 
Papa's only fault — trusts everybody . . 
'Mama's the balance wheel,' my brothei 
and I used to say, laughing, 'that keeps 
starvation away.' But we were happy's 
the day is long. Had fun. 

"I sometimes think — I often think, wher 
I reminisce about the old days and the 
old ways, that I'd like to go back home tc 
live. Buy or build us a place in Berea 
Real secure feeling in living with folk; 
who really love you. . . ." 



On the . ceiling of Red's den, on th« 
exact center of the ceiling, were pasted 
exactly nine records. Nine of Red's rec 
ords. _ 

"Had a notion," Red explains, "of paperi '.! 
ing the ceiling, the whole of it, with my 
waxings. But, when I found out it took 
forty-five minutes to fasten just one o; 
'em up there with linoleum paste, gave uj 
the notion. Purely an experiment, I sasJ 
of it now. . . . The center record, around 
which the others, you might say, revolve 
is 'Peace In the Valley.' My favorite, as J 
I told you . . . it's a sacred number. It ha^ 
a real deep meaning to it. Every time yoUf 
sing it, it gives you a little more hope and 
faith that there's something better than 
what we have to face right now. | 

"Something better, like the horrie I come 
from," Red said fervently, "like the home 
I hope this home is now going to be . . 
for the kids! . . . for Sally . . . and for me.'' 



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Wendy Warren's Little Mrs. Innocent 



(Continued from page 48) 
came engaged, Bill gave me a hand- 
rved MacLeod figure, the first item in 
X Scotch collection. TTien, my a\int, Mrs. 
miel Gillespie of Florida, gave me a 
lire that resembles the late Sir Harry 
luder. We both knew we had Scottish 
cestry — Bill's mother was a Mac- 
tosh. . . ." 

"And then Jean discovered that she was 
MacPherson," interrupts BUI, a very 
■ottish-looking Bill, with red hair, well- 
iselled features and a fine, athletic build. 
Jean, who can't bear to sit stUl a minute, 
eaks in, "Oh, let me finish dear. It was 
thrilling. It seems that Angus, chief 
the Clan Macintosh, married Eva Mac- 
lerson, heiress to the MacPherson clan, 
was a love match and the two clans 
ited to become united. They adopted 
e same coat of arms, the one you see in 
e guest room — incidentally. Bill painted 
—and have been united ever since. So 
lu see, BUI and I were destined for each 
her back in the Middle Ages." 
While it wasn't bagpipes which brought 
e two together in the first place, it was 
lother Scotsman — Jim Davidson, Bill's 
•st friend — who inadvertently made the 
atch. It was a broiling, sizzling July 
•st, three years ago. Jean had just 
lished at the studio when Jim asked her 
join a big crowd going to Jones Beach 
r a swimming party. She accepted, 
et BUI and they were married the fol- 
wing winter. "We just love Jones Beach," 
;an reflects dreamUy. "We met there. 
ill proposed there. And they sure have 
le best hot dogs!" 

Inscribed inside BUl's wedding ring is. 
To Mac from Bonnie Jean." 
Since Jim was so helpful in finding BUI 
wife, BUI stood up as Jim's best man 
hen Jim married Mary Denny, daughter 
; George V. Denny, former moderator of 
own Meeting Of The Air. 
Before the fiireplace is Jean's prize pos- 
!Ssion, a marble-topped coffee table her 
lother picked up at an antique shop in 
ennis, Massachusetts, for only twenty 
Dllars. A few months later her mother 
kewise discovered the almost matching 
larble-topped commode now in the foyer, 
>r an incredible eight dollars. 
"My mother is absolutely fabulous," 
lys Jecin, fluffing her hair with her hand. 
She was the one who started me off on 
aUet when I was three. By the time I 
'as five I was dancing protessionaUy in 
Joston and probably would have been 
ballet dancer, since I'm the right size 
nd build and just loved it." 
She pauses and suddenly lets out a yell. 
a the corner of the room is Baskerville, 
he beagle puppy, chewing on a small 
•lack object. "My ballet slippers!" She 
escues the tiny toe shoes, her only sou- 
enir of childhood lessons. They are less 
, han five inches long, half -worn and very 
irecious. 
"Mother brought me to New York when 
was eleven and entered me at the Pro- 
essional ChUdren's School. Most of the 
ither children were acting so I began to 
Vet, too, and it was wonderful. 
I "Soon I was back in Boston, though, 
'alaying simimer theatre in Plymouth. A 
ew years later I came back to New York 
' ind very luckUy got the ingenue part in 
' I Broadway play, 'Chicken Every Sun- 
lay,' which became a big hit. With a 
ureekly paycheck coming in, I coiUd scout 
iround for jobs in radio. 

"On radio I became the girl-friend type, 
Effst Henry Aldrich's and then a long run 
as Alan Young's girl. When the Alan 
young show moved to HoUywood, the 
whole cast went along, but I got homesick 
Jm- New York and rushed back the minute 



my contract ran out." 

Since then, Jean has had choice parts on 
Ford Theatre, Kraft Theatre, Studio One, 
and Suspense, on television. Her recent 
radio roles have included playing Patricia 
SiUlivan on Wendy Warren And The News 
as well as parts on The Guiding Light and 
Aunt Jenny, the latter being the first time 
she and BUI have worked together. 

BUI is an actor, too. He and Jean first 
met when he was in the Broadway com- 
pany of "South Pacific." On the Aunt 
Jenny program, BUI played the "other 
man"' and didn't even get Jean at the 
end. "Well, at least we have each other in 
real life," says Bill, smilingly tenderly at 
his tiny wife, curled up in an armchair. 

The apartment is tastefully furnished 
and cozy. The great delight to both of 
them is the two and a half bathrooms. 
"No traffic problems when we're both 
rushing off somewhere," says Jean. 
"We're so spoUed, but we're enjoying our 
luck so much. I use the bathroom off our 
bedroom. It's large and roomy and I can 
hang mj' stockings up without worrying 
about annoying Bill. 

"He uses the one next to the guest room. 
It has a stall shower which he loves." 

Usually, Jean and BUI entertain small- 
ish groups of friends so they can all get 
comfortable and sprawled out for a good 
gab-fest. Most of their friends are not 
of the theatre or entertainment world, and 
when there's company the television stays 
off. 

Most precious of their possessions are, 
first, their eleven-month-old beagle, named 
Baskerville. His real name is Prince Mac 
of Baskerville and his pedigree is longer 
than his name. Second is the eighteen- 
foot pennant class sailboat, named the 
Bonnie J, they bought last summer and 
keep at Five Mile River, near Darien, Con- 
necticut, some sixty miles from New York. 
"We thought we would rather have a boat 
than a summer home," Jean explains. 
"So what happened? The week after we 
bought it, I began appearing regularly on 
The Guiding Light and we only managed 
to sail about once a week. This year, 
it'll be different. Can't wait to breathe 
that wonderful air." 

Jean's fragUe, delicate appearance is 
deceptive. She is made of iron and more 
than holds her own as an expert sailor 
and horsewoman. Her early ballet train- 
ing formed good exercise habits she has 
never forgotten. She stUl takes regular 
ballet and vocal lessons to keep in trim — 
and also against the day she and Bill may 
work together in a Broadway musical. 

The only thing Jean collects, besides 
phonograph records and books, is Toby 
jugs, the amusing pottery jugs from Eng- 
land which can be recognized by the funny 
faces on them. 

A fairly recent addition to their house- 
hold is a 35mm color camera. "We went 
aU out with the csimera, take it with us 
everywhere, up to Canada for skiing, for 
drives in the coiintry. We've got so much 
footage we can bore people for eight hours 
straight!' 

To hear each talk about the other, there 
never were two such talented, charming, 
lovable, generous, exciting people in the 
world. Two people who are terribly right 
for each other. 

They find happiness in living together, 
working together, buUding a home and in- 
terwined careers which wUl give them 
security and contentment. They guide 
themselves by a set of standards surpris- 
ingly modest for young, exciting show 
io]k. 

Jean SToms it up: "We like our home, 
ovir dog, our work — and each other!" 



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89 



(Continued from page 53) 
for work and sleep. 

But he was a boatsman who took to the 
water on his days off. Many times he 
anchored in Long Island Sound's Echo Bay. 
One house there appealed to him, although 
there were many others more majestic in 
appearance— for example, Tommy Man- 
ville's thirty-two-room mansion. But this 
one house, in its acre and a quarter, held 
a real fascination for Dennis. It was built 
on the side of a hill that sloped down into 
the water. It was a family house. Dennis 
would look up at a huge circular window 
and he could see right into a very livable 
hving room. It was love at sight, but a 
frustrated love affair for Dennis — a house 
just doesn't fit into a bachelor's life. 

Life took a new turn for Dennis in De- 
cember of 1951 when he married Marjorie 
"Mickie" Crawford. Mickie had discovered 
that Dennis is just as serious as he is 
amiable, just as persistent as he is charm- 
ing. He didn't exactly bowl her over, for 
Mickie— though as pretty as a glamorous 
model— didn't like glamour. She was a 
small -town girl and liked small -town peo- 
ple. She was skeptical of a big city star. 
In a year's courtship, she learned that 
Dennis was a real guy and that his fam- 
ous showmanship was the result of honest, 
hard work. 

"When you marry a girl like Mickie," 
Dermis says, "you just naturally think of a 
real home and the things that go with it. 

"The house on the Soimd had always 
stuck in my mind," Dennis recalls, "but 
you just don't go around envying someone 
else's property." 

Finally, getting up nerve enough to in- 
quire about the home on Echo Bay, Dennis 
found out it was on the market. The 
Jameses went out to see it. Mickie was 
thrilled. Dennis was beside himself with 
delight. They took the house and, July of 
last summer, moved in. 

Some few miles from Manhattan, Echo 
Haven can be reached by land or water. 
Its front yard, in New Rochelle, New York, 
is a green lawn with apple and pine trees! 
Its backyard is the Long Island Sound. It 
is a ten-room house, impressive and ex- 
citing, for each of the rooms has a beauty 
and individuality of its own. 

Through the front door (land side), the 
Jameses step into a large foyer. Directly 
ahead is a sunken living room, twenty-five 
feet wide, which stretches into eternity— 
for the far wall is all glass, a series of ceil- 
mg-to-floor windows which curve the 
width of the room. 

"This is our Cinerama," Mickie says. 

In this huge bay, you are literally sitting 
in space. There are two leather chairs 
facing the window, a thirty-power tele- 
scope, binoculars and reading lamps. (But 
Mickie says, it's difficult to concentrate on 
reading.) There is the sweep of the sea 
or a hundred ducks flocking on the water 
or boats moving across the horizon. 

When night falls and the lights go on, 
the windows are black mirrors, reflecting 
a magnificent paneled fireplace. On the 
mantel is a gift from Paul Winchell a 
clock wound by barometric pressure, and 
there are a couple of mahogany figures 
Dennis picked up in Haiti. The carpeting 
IS tan and the chairs and fabrics follow 
through m various shades of the same 
color. 

"Decorating a house is a job that never 
quits, Dennis says. 

« * S^ ?u'"*i *°, ^ "^^^y acquired nest of 
tables that he designed himself. The tables 
are curved to fit the end of a long sofa 
against a wall and facing the fireplace. A 
few feet forward of the sofa is a large 



Home for a Lifetime 

calfskin-covered ottoman. Their coffee 
table is home-designed. A huge piece of 
driftwood is the base for a clear panel of 
free form glass shaped something like the 
left sole of a shoe. Flanking the fireplace 
are two tall table lamps with square black 
bases, white columns and square shades 
which Dennis and Mickie had made from 
wallpaper. One panel on the side of the 
fireplace encloses a TV set which Dennis 
mounted himself. 

But, according to Mickie, "Most of our 
friends usually head for the game room." 
This is downstairs. On the knotty-pine 
paneled walls are plaques and awards hon- 
oring Dennis, pictures of friends, a dart 
game and an antique musket. There are 
two leather chairs fronting a fieldstone 
fireplace, another television set and a 
handsome hickory table built on a barrel, 
together with some barrel chairs. Because 
the house is built on a slope, these win- 
dows, too, face out on Long Island Soimd. 
Next to the game room, Dennis has built 
himself a tool chest and workbench. And 
there is also a laundry room with a deep 
freeze that boasts, among other things, 
several gallons of spaghetti sauce made 
by Dennis' mother to be served when she 
is away. 

All has not been living in heaven for the 
Jameses, however. They've had two major 
catastrophes. The first week at Echo 
Haven, Mickie found Dennis on the gar- 
age floor in a pool of blood. In pulling 
down the overhead door, he was smashed 
on the head, had eighteen stitches taken, 
and was in the hospital for two weeks. 
Dennis, who was a middleweight boxing 
champ in college, can't recall ever being 
hit so hard. 

"Now we play it safe," he says. "We 
have an electronic device that opens and 
closes the door from the car." 

The Jameses' dining room is beige, with 
a blond oak table and dull black chairs, but 
Dennis and Mickie eat many of their meals 
on their "dining terrace," glassed in 
against the weather. Outside this terrace 
is a circular flagstone pavihon, then a 
sharp drop down to the water where a 
pier is under construction. Dennis gave up 
his big boat and now owns a Chris-Craft 
speedboat, a sailboat and a dinghy. The 
pier, scene of their second pamful mem- 
ory, has been tmder construction too long. 
"We started work on it last year and, of 
course, wanted it finished last summer so 
we could get some use out of it," Dennis 
recalls. "Not until the day before Labor 
Day was it completed." 

Labor Day there was a storm and Dennis 
sat in his "Cinerama" watching the ele- 
ments pound and rip and tear until his 
pier was washed away. The new pier, 
started this past spring, should be ready 
by July. (The Jameses have their fingers 
crossed.) 

In the meantime, Dennis docks his boats 
across the bay and, on good afternoons, 
takes his friends for rides along the Sound. 
Among others, he has had Herb Shriner 
and Jack Carson out. They may stop at the 
Westchester Country Club for lunch and 
a swim, although the Jameses can swim 
right off their own float which bobs some 
fifty feet off their property. There are 
lights at the rear of the house to illuminate 
the water for after-dinner swims. 

The master bedroom also faces the Sound. 
It's large and handsome, with another fire- 
place and another television set. French 
windows open on a terrace large enough 
to hold a small table and a few chairs. 
This is where Dennis has his fruit juice 
and coffee each morning, reads the paper 
and his mail. 

Dennis loves the beauty of the morning 



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hours. There are misty days when fishir 
boats lie just off shore. There are sunn '', 
mornings when gulls swoop in from tl *^ 
horizon. Not usually an early riser, i ' 
makes it a point occasionally to get up an 
watch a sunrise. 

The headboard and the spread on tlm^ 
huge bed are of charcoal gray tweed. Tb 
carpeting is rose, with flecks of gold. 

On the fourth level of the house ther 
are two more rooms. The first is a tern 
porary sewing room. Temporary, becaus 
one day the Jameses hope it will be the) 
nursery. In the meantime, the sewing ma 
chine has been whirring. Mickie and he 
mother have whizzed through a numbe 
of drapes and chair covers. 

Adjoining the future nursery is th»"' 
studio where Mickie and Dennis pain "^ 
mount and edit their film. Mickie is a: ' 
artist and Dennis has been painting eve "'l 
since he met her. There are many paint 
mgs and prints throughout the hous( 
Dennis' first is in the dining room, a land ■- 
scape His last, a portrait of his fathei "i 
hangs in the foyer opposite a water colo 
Ted Mack gave him. 

"Using the word hobby loosely," Denni 
says, "you might say the house is now m-' 
chief hobby." 

A I 

As a former apartment-dweller, Denni ^ 
has learned quickly. He knows about toj ■ 
soil and fertilizing and other gardening ' 
problems. He has learned from experienct 
about plumbing, insulating, constructing 
and the dozens of other things that hav« 
to be done around a house. When he hunf 
his first painting he wound up with a nine- 
inch hole in the wall. Now he knows abou 
plaster and is a master handyman. 

"The projects on the outside are mine,' 
he explains, "and Mickie runs the house." 
Louise, their permanent staff of one, is 
invaluable to both. Dennis counts her as 
not only cook but secretary and critic 
Louise has been around TV and radic 
"shop talk" so much that when she watches 
Dennis' shows she feels the same tension 
as the producer. 

Louise, like Mickie, seldom misses one 
of Dennis' programs and when he gets 
home she is right on hand to answer his 
inevitable question, "How did it sound?'' 
Dennis is justifiably proud of his starring 
roles on Chance Of A Lifetime and Turn 
To A Friend. But he privately admits that 
the real satisfaction isn't found merely ini- 
their success. Both are the kind of showsf* 
he has always wanted to emcee, for both 
give concrete help to deserving people. 

Sometimes both Mickie and Dennis are 
so busy that their paths don't cross for 
hours. Dennis has solved this problem with 
an inter-com system connecting all floors. 
It saves time running up and down stairs 
trying to find something. 

"Not that I can count on Mickie's mem- 
ory," Dennis says. 

The story that Mickie tells on herself 
happened the day Dennis called in from 
Manhattan. He had forgotten to pack a 
fresh suit for that night's Chance Of A 
Lifetime. Mickie said she would bring a 
suit right in. An hour or so later she drove 
up to the theatre and delivered a suitcase. 
The suitcase was empty. 

They both laughed easily at this, for they 
are sure of each other. Dennis frankly 
traces his happiness from the day he met 
Mickie. 

„. '-^^ wonderful as the house is," he says, 
"it would be nothing without Mickie. I 
wouldn't want it without her." 

You really couldn't find another married 
couple — or house — which speak more elo- i 
quently of their own happiness. 



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Joan Alexander 



(Continued from page 51) 

rt about being '"to just the right degree, 

;0d." Not too good to be human, but then 

no means bad. Which, in good part, is 

i result of the very close relationship of 

s mother-daughter team . . . the very 

distic and understanding attitude of this 

•)ther toward her daughter. 

'Just like any other working mother," 

plains Joan, "when I come home I. too, 

1 sometimes just plain tired. At these 

aes I must be particularly careful not 

let Jane develop a feeling of being in 

e way ... of not being wanted at that 

jment. She must never feel that after a 

U day at the studios I am too tired to 

ly with her or be interested in her day's 

tivities. Actually, this sounds much 

rder than it really is. In the first place, I 

1, naturally, vitally interested in Jane's 

ily activities. In the second place, she's 

enthusiastic that it's hard not to be 

ught up in her gay whirl. In fact, when 

lo come home seemingly exhausted, she's 

actly the medicine I need. Before I know 

she's set my world back to rights again. 

hich is one of the many reasons I would 

.•ver dream of vacationing without Jane." 

Every sununer in Jane's young life, she 

is vacationed with her mother — or is it 

e other way around? They are such a 

?rfect pair, that it's hard to say which is 

)ing for the other. Acquaintances who do 

>t understand this unusual rapport be- 

/een mother and daughter are inclined to 

-onder why Joan doesn't want to "get 

vay from it all" during her hard-earned 

ree-week vacations. They wonder how it 

possible to have a really restful and re- 

xing vacation with a six-year-old . . , 

in't a child sometimes be more of a strain 

.an a pleasure for a mother, especially on 

ications? 

"Unfortunately," replies Joan, "I'm sure 

is is often true. Healthy children are nat- 

.'ally active. But the fact that they are 

tive doesn't mean they need be irritating. 

ine times out of ten, the child who is al- 

ays getting into mischief is the child who 

trying to get attention. More than that, is 

riving for affection — rather than the 

olding he or she is bound to get. And, if 

child must go to extremes in order to get 

.tention, isn't that really the parents' 

iult? As for Jane, she's not only loved, but 

le knows she's loved. She doesn't have 

J get into Mother's perfume, or tear pages 

ut of books in order to get attention. In 

ict, it's quite the other way around. Right 

om the very beginning, and I don't think 

's ever too soon to start teaching, Jane 



learned — 'sensed' might be a better word — 
that, when she was good and sweet, she 
received the like in return. Right from the 
very beginning she sensed she was loved 
and wanted. She knows that \inder no cir- 
cumstances is she ever in the way. She is 
old enough now to know that her parents 
enjoy her . . . enjoy being with her. Enjoy 
her being with them. She feels secure . . . 
and, being secure, is happy and loving." 

This love that represents such security to 
little Jane becomes immediately obvious 
to any stranger at first meeting with the 
two J's. Obviously, the parents' friends are 
always also the daughter's friends. In fact, 
it might be said that Jane is the demi- 
hostess. When, for example, dinner guests 
arrive, Jane, who has by now been fed and 
bathed, is right at her mother's side greet- 
ing and hostessing. Then, when her bed- 
time arrives, without any fuss she warmly 
says good -night and trundles off with her 
mother, who tucks her in for the night. 
Why no fuss? Just because Jane has never 
felt her parents were trying to get rid of 
her . . . get her out of the way. It's just that 
it's bedtime and, naturally, when it's bed- 
time one goes to bed. And, furthermore, 
her mother's going with her to tuck her in 
and spend those last wonderful moments 
before the Sandman claims her for the 
night. It's as simple as all that. It's as 
natural as all that. It's a result of love 
and security. 

"Vacations with my daughter are fun . . . 
not a strain," Joan says. "Of course, it's 
true that, when you're vacationing with a 
small child, you, the adult, must make up 
your mind to one thing — plans must be 
made in deference to the child. That is, 
the parent must adjust to the child, not 
vice versa. That doesn't, however, mean 
that you must prepare to spend the entire 
time cutting out paper doUs and blowing 
bubbles . . . which would, admittedly, be 
quite a strain on an adult. No, quite to the 
contrary, children like to feel grown-up 
. . . like to do things they see adults doing 
. . . and, with a little thought, you can ar- 
range to include your child in your activi- 
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"For instance, I am very fond of antiques 
and love to brouse through antique shops — 
particularly those in the country. For the 
last several years, we have rented summer 
cottages in Easthampton, Long Island. I 
manage to get out on weekends and, of 
course, always spend my three-week vaca- 
tions there. For the past two summers I 
have taken Jane with me on brief excur- 
sions to antique shops. 



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"I discovered that Jane's simply fasci- 
nated with such things as barber poles, 
cigar-store Indians, old sleighs and the 
like. So now I take her with me with com- 
plete ease of mind . . . knowing that she 
will be happy sitting in a sleigh or talking 
with an old wooden Indian. I accomplish 
something for myself, and at the same time 
give Jane a good time. Last summer she 
completely amazed me by suddenly asso- 
ciating marble with the word 'Victorian' 
. . . she had, evidently, been following my 
activities more closely than I thought. Now 
every time she sees a marble-top table, 
with the voice of authority she proclaims 
it as being 'Victorian.' " 

Having spent all the summers of her 
young life near Long Island's beaches, 
Jane is as much at home on a beach as she 
is in her own room. Whereas she loved 
the sand at first sight, it did take her a 
little time to get on equally friendly terms 
with the water. However, Joan never tried 
to coax her . . . just bided her time until 
Jane of her own accord would display an 
interest in getting her feet wet. "The only 
thing I did," explains Joan, "was, whenever 
I returned from a swim, I would briefly 
wax enthusiastic about the water. Even- 
tually, one day I found Jane trudging to 
the water's edge with me, and very cas- 
ually — just as though we had done this 
every day of our lives — Jane and 'Mommy' 
took their first dip together. She has no 
fear of the water because she never had 
a fear to overcome ... a fear that is so 
often merely the result of parents trying 
to force the issue." 

The beach in nice weather takes up a 
big part of Joan's and Jane's vacation time. 
They pack picnic lunches and spend the 
day swimming, digging tunnels, building 
sand forts, and playing a somewhat less 
adult version of Joan's TV game. The 
Name's The Same. During the afternoon 
Jane curls up under the beach umbrella 



and takes a nap — wnicn gives joan an op- 
portunity to read that good book she . 
brought along. Once in a while a friend 
will come out to spend the day. "Actually," 
says Joan, "I do very little entertaining 
while I'm vacationing with Jane, and any 
friends who do come out know ahead of 
time that they will have to fit in with our 
plans. To put it bluntly, I have very little 
opportunity to spend entire days with my 
daughter, so, when the opportunity does 
come along, I refuse to let anything inter- 
fere. 

"And, speaking of guests, one day early 
last summer, one of my dearest friends, 
Lucille Wall, the radio actress, came out to 
spend the day. She had remembered Jane's 
being curious about people's flower gar- 
dens — more or less hinting that she would 
like a garden of her own — and had come 
armed with several packages of seeds. So 
the three of us went to work helping Jane 
plant her garden. It was really a stroke of 
genius on the part of Lucille. Jane loved 
her garden, and toiled over it daily with 
full pride of ownership. No matter what we 
did for the rest of the summer, it had to be 
done after the garden was taken care of. 
If the flowers didn't quite come up to some 
of those growing in other people's gardens, 
it wasn't because of lack of loving care on 
the part of its little owner. And, from my 
point of view, the garden was doubly won- 
derful — while Jane was busy being a gar- 
dener, I was given an opportunity to take 
care of small chores around the house." 

Gardening was only the first of several 
new experiences to enter Jane's life that 
summer. The second was fishing ... an ex- 
perience which was also new to Joan. Dur- 
ing past summers they had often watched 
men fishing from the beaches, or stood by 
as the fishing boats came into the harbor. 
But this summer Jane evinced great inter- 
est in trying out this adult sport herself. 
After making inquiries and satisfying her- 



seit tnat sucn a venture would be quite sat( 
for a five-year-old, Joan and Jane boardi 
a fishing boat and spent several hours 
the harbor happily pulling in blowfish. The' 
skipper cooperated in honor of the occasion 
by cleaning a number of their catch "for 
Mommy to cook for dinner." "One thing's 
for sure," laughs Joan, "we didn't go fish- 
ing too often . .I'm not that fond of blow- 
fish! 

"I guess the part of vacationing with 
children that most parents look upon with 
jaundiced eye," continues Joan, "is the 
rainy day. What to do with the small fry 
when it rains. We had a number of activi- 
ties held aside for those rainy days. Visit- 
ing antique shops was one. Going to a 
children's movie was another ... I must 
admit I think I enjoyed this activity as 
much as Jane. Then, of course, you can 
usually count on children making friends 
with their contemporaries and, since Jane 
is an extremely outgoing little person- 
ality, she has always had many friends . . . 
summers included. We would have tea par- 
ties with the children next door, or the 
children down the road. Jane has a little 
electric toy stove on which she can make 
tea and tiny little cupcakes . . . you know, 
the ready-mix kind. So, there would be 
great excitement on rainy days when Jane 
prepared for a tea party. As for me ... I'd 
be not too far away getting through the 
next dozen or so pages of my vacation 
reading. 

"As for what I do with my evenings, 
that's simple, too. I go to bed almost as 
early as Jane. Then, when the sunrise rolls 
around, I'm as willing and eager to meet 
the new day as my young daughter. In 
fact, I'm more eager than Jane, because to 
me the new day means that many more 
hours with my adorable, wonderful, beau- 
tiful, bright and— to just the right degree 
— good daughter ... if you'll pardon a 
prejudiced mother!" 



The Blessed Help of People 



{Continued from page 61) 
before Christmas when the telephone rang 
and the "miracle of Olney" — as she calls 
it — began! 

It was a dreary day for more than sea- 
sonal reasons. Here she was, seventy-four 
years old, with seven foster-children to 
care for on just about $150 a month. She 
had successfully reared almost one hun- 
dred children, including the current seven, 
but this year's drought had totally de- 
stroyed her garden and its annual yield of 
1500 quarts of fruits and vegetables. These 
vegetables and other products would have 
normally helped "her children" through 
the winter. 

This year the old frame house seemed 
to be cold and drafty. As she cooked what 
little there was to eat, on an ancient three- 
legged wood stove. Miss Grsiffort looked 
longingly at an empty space where an ice- 
box had once stood. Even that was now 
gone. 

For herself, she didn't worry, but winter 
lay ahead— with absolutely no hope of 
comfort for the youngsters under her roof. 
After nearly thirty years of caring for al- 
most a hundred children — three of them 
legally adopted by Miss Graffort — and giv- 
ing each the individual attention and love 
of a real mother, the prospect of failing 
her charges wcis a grim, depressing one. 

Atha Graffort didn't discover until later 
that, on that cold winter night, she had 
H been carefully maneuvered into position 
near a certain telephone by her sister, Mrs. 
Frank Griffith of nearby Corso, Missouri. 
Shortly after eight o'clock, the telephone 
rang and, suddenly, Atha Graffort was 



speaking to Ralph Edwards and being 
heard over the airwaves by the millions of 
listeners to his popular Truth Or Conse- 
quences program. 

Ralph explained to the incredulous old 
lady that the story of her lifetime devotion 
to children had been brought to his atten- 
tion by one of her former foster-children. 
Because of her self-sacrifice and utter 
selflessness, he and his sponsors wished to 
make her life easier in the future with a 
deep freeze, a gas range, a refrigerator 
and a year's supply of Pet Milk. Ralph 
and Miss Graffort chatted for a minute and 
Miss Graffort's genuine emotion was 
enough to touch the hearts of people all 
over this nation. 

After he wished her good luck, Ralph 
Edwards hung up the phone. Turning to 
his audience, he asked each Truth Or Con- 
sequences listener to help Atha Graffort 
and her foster-children by sending one 
can of food to her home in Missouri. 

That's when the avalanche began. From 
everywhere in the country packages ar- 
rived literally by the truckload, until there 
were some thirty truckloads in all. Post- 
mistress Mellie Duval, who has never had 
to handle more than three or four pack- 
ages in any one day, was cornpletely over- 
whelmed by the onslaught. Extra help 
was called into the main post office at 
Silex, Missouri. Extra trucks and a huge 
semi-trailer were commandeered to carry 
the letters, boxes, bags and crates — all of 
which totalled 12,846 packages and 3,949 
letters containing $4,465.07 in money gifts. 

They included a side of beef from a 
rancher in Colorado, a hind quarter of 



venison from California, an order of dresses' 
from Denver for Miss Graffort and three 
foster-daughters, and a crate from a bank 
in Birmingham filled with boxes, cans and 
bags. 

Radio Station KJFJ, Webster City, Iowa, 
made Atha Graffort's needs their special 
project. Station General Manager Wayne 
J. Hatchett sent 600 pounds of food, com- 
pliments of KJFJ listeners. 

Within days, the post office and Miss 
Graffort's old three-story frame house were 
in a state of orderly chaos. Neighbors 
pitched in to help the slightly dazed little 
woman arrange and catalogue the over 
50,000 separate food containers scattered 
through the four bedrooms, the roomy 
kitchen and overflowing onto the big front : 
porch. 

"I could almost go into the grocery busi- 
ness with all this food," gasped Miss Graf- 
fort, bright blue eyes agog behind her 
glasses at the four-foot-high wall of sup- 
plies stacked in every room. 

Even more inspiring was the fact that 
every gift bore a message of courage and: I 
hope straight from the hearts of folks all 
over the country who appreciate the value 
of mother love. 

Of the scores of children Atha Graffort 
has raised in the past twenty-eight years, ' 
eighty were wards of the St. Louis Board i 
of Children's Guardians, homeless and at 
least temporarily motherless. Sixteen were 
with Miss Graffort from infancy until 
adulthood. It was one of these sixteen, now 
Mrs. J. P. Campbell of El Paso, Texas, who 
wrote to Ralph Edwards. 

Miss Graffort describes how the child 



came into her care. "Her mother was a 
sickly widow* and came to the hospital 
here in St. Louis. One day she told the 
doctor she felt she was going to die and 
didn't know what would hapi>en to her 
child. 

"The doctor said, 'Send her to me,' think- 
ing the mother would be well soon. The 
woman went home. Later, she died and 
the twelve-year-old girl came to the 
doctor. 

"He didn't know what to do, so when I 
heard the story I took her home with me. 
She stayed until she was eighteen, married 
a minister's son — a very nice boy. 

"Never a Mother's Day or Christmas 
goes by that I don't hear from her. And 
now, her writing to Ralph Edwards has 
given me help when I needed it most. One 
of the joys of having children is knowing 
they appreciate you and love and think 
of you even when they have their own 
families to worry about." 

Reminiscence put a faraway look in Miss 
Graffort's eyes. "It seems like I've had 
children all my life. My mother was an 
invalid and I kept boarders so I could 
be home with her and still earn some 
money. Somehow people began asking me 
to care for their children. 

"I raised my brother's child. He sent 
her to me by mail when she was less than 
two years old. She arrived on the train with 
a tag attached to her." 

Miss Graffort can tell lots of love stories 
about her offspring, but her favorite is 
about Helen. Like teenagers in any family, 
Helen objected to babies, and specifically 
to her foster-mother's plan for taking 
some into the house. 

"I've got a nice boy friend," Helen had 
protested, "and I know what will happen. 
He'll be here some night and you'll call, 
'Helen, come help me put a diaper on the 
baby.' " 

Miss Grafifort promised to be real care- 
ful and keep the babies out of sight. But, 
sure enough, one afternoon when Helen's 
boy friend stopped in unexpectedly, Atha 
called down, "Helen, come help me diaper 
the baby." 

Helen came up the stairs, bellowing like 
a calf from embarrassment. Right behind 
her was the young man, laughing at 
Helen's discomfort and delighted with the 
baby. A tender look came over him as he 
said, "Helen, why don't we stay home to- 
night with the babies and let Mama go to 
the movies instead?" 

Of course, they are now happily married. 
And who do you suppose watches their 
babies? 

In her own way, Miss Graffort can teach 
child psychologists a thing or two. Take 



the case of Mary Catherine. Mary Cather- 
ine held her mouth firmly shut, refused 
to say a word. 

"She could talk, but she just wouldn't. 
The board sent her to me thinking maybe 
I could get her to loosen up. 

"On the way home we passed a ' store 
with some beautiful apples in the window. 
I said, 'If I had one of the children with 
me who could talk and who'd ask me to 
buy one of those apples I'd go in and 
get one.' 

"Mary Catherine replied, 'You go to the 
dickens.' 

"I bought that apple anyhow and there- 
after Mary Catherine was fine." 

Bustling around her new, modern 
kitchen, confident of a good supply of food 
and money for her brood, she remarked, 
"It is the most wonderful feeling that for 
the first time in my life I have security 
for my children. If my 'miracle of Olney' 
hadn't happened, two of my boys would be 
forced to leave high school in the first 
year — and what kind of future could they 
have without education? 

"I would probably have had to give up 
most of the children. Four of them, in- 
cluding the twins, are from one family. 
They might be separated. I couldn't bear 
to think of brothers and sisters being apart 
from one another. Now the youngsters can 
stop worrying and with spring here I can 
plant the garden again." 

It's all peaceful and quiet-like these days 
in Olney, Missouri. The excitement of 
hearing Miss Graffort on Ralph Edwards' 
Truth Or Consequences has simmered 
down to a wonderful memory. The neigh- 
bors have stopped marveling. The re- 
porters are back to chasing fires. The 
heroine of all the fuss has picked up the 
threads — now strengthened — of her profes- 
sion as mother and homemaker. 

Things may seem about the same as they 
did last year just before the now-famous 
telephone call, but there is a difference 
every mother can recognize and appreci- 
ate. It's security. Not only the security Miss 
Graffort feels at knowing she will be able 
to carry on her work, but there is the 
added reassurance of a family united, of a 
town dropping everything to help out, of 
a stranger who runs a radio program and 
thousands of his listeners responding with 
warmth and vigor to another lady's needs. 

Miss Atha Graffort moves toward the 
twilight of a rich, satisfying life. She has 
her children who keep her in touch with 
their travels, their marriages and, now, 
their children, too. 

"I may be an old maid," she admits, 
smiling roguishly. "But I'm several times 
a grandmother!" 




"If someone had 
only told me . , 



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93 



Life's Hard-won Victories Are Hers 



(Continued from page 44) 
States at eleven, when she entered school 
in Los Angeles. For one thing, they left 
Joan — who was Dellie Ellis then, until a 
motion picture studio changed her name 
to Joan Lorring — with a mind alert to 
every new experience and an ear so at- 
tuned to foreign tongues and dialects that 
both qualities were to serve her well later. 
They helped greatly when she became an 
actress, first on radio, then in Hollywood 
movies, on the Broadway stage, and finally 
in New York radio cind television. 

Her first acting chance, however, had 
nothing to do with being able to imitate 
dialects, or really with anything specific 
at all. "I was just sort of led into it," she 
says. "My mother and I thought I might 
come out well in an audition for a chil- 
dren's radio program, so we went." She 
was barely thirteen at the time, a tiny 
bronze-haired child with hazel-gray eyes. 

However, Ann Nichols, the writer of that 
children's show, liked her so much that 
she wrote a part for Joan into her dramatic 
radio serial. Dear John, which starred Irene 
Rich. Joan played the part for almost a 
year, and it was the beginning of a whole 
series of opportunities for her. By the time 
she was seventeen she was still playing 
children's roles but had added grown-up 
parts on many dramatic shows, such as 
Lux Radio Theatre and Suspense. Pro- 
ducers quickly discovered her gift for dia- 
lects, and she played everything from 
cockneys to little girls from the Deep South 
— or from Paris or Vienna. 

"I had heard almost every language 
spoken by people who came to China from 
all over the world," Joan recalls. "I heard 
English that was marked with every kind 
of accent. When I visited Europe and 
heard languages that should have been 
foreign to me, I realized that they didn't 
sound foreign at all, and all my childhood 
memories came flooding back. It was very 
strange." 

Joan's performance as the little Welsh 
girl, in the film version of "The Corn Is 
Green," won her a nomination for the 
Academy Award as best supporting actress 
of 1945. But, after making several movies, 
Joan left Hollywood in 1948 to do a season 
of summer stock, always working toward 
her goal of more and more training for her 
job as an actress. In the fall she began to 
knock at the doors of the New York ad- 
vertising agencies and the producers who 
had radio roles to offer: "My first dramatic 
part on a daytime program was in This Is 
Nora Drake, on which I played Suzanne 
for the next two years. Then I came back 
to the program last year to play Grace, a 
role I hope to continue for a long time." 

B eing back on the Nora Drake program 
was a real thrill to Joan. Arthur Hanna is 
directing it, and she thinks he's tops. Les 
Damon, who plays Dr. Sargent, was there 
to greet her. And Charles Paul, who plays 
the organ on so many shows. 

"I've known Joan Tompkins the longest 
of anyone in New York radio," Joan Lor- 
ring says, "and though our friendship has 
been mostly confined to our working hours, 
there has always been a warm, good feel- 
ing between us. She is one of the best 
people I have ever met. We have such a 
good cast — Ruth Newton plays Vivian, 
Elizabeth Lawrence is Marguerite, Joe 
Mantell is Cass Todero, Bill Quinn is Fred 
Molina, Dick York is Russ McClure — 
Dick's characterization of Russ McClure 
ff is really wonderful. Actually, the who^e 
„ cast is more than just a group of people 
who gather to work together. There is a 
real and warm interest shared among us. 
Milt Lewis, the writer, and Frank Hig- 
94 



gins, of the agency, are also part of the 
clan — which is unusual and very nice." 

There was a time when Joan hardly 
realized how difficult it sometimes is to 
get radio work, until she heard other tal- 
ented young actresses and actors discuss 
their lack of breaks. When she began to 
analyze her own situation, she wondered 
how much of it really was due to luck, as 
she had thought, and how much to her 
being good at her job. And she began to 
evaluate herself more realistically. Maybe 
it wasn't all luck. Maybe she had been 
underestimating herself. 

This feeling was strengthened later when, 
in her very first part on the Broadway 
stage, she won the important Donaldson 
award "for the best debut performance on 
Broadway" during the 1949-50 season. The 
role was that of Marie, the young roomer 
in the play "Come Back, Little Sheba," 
and the star was Shirley Booth, who later 
starred in the movie version. Joan played 
an important role in another Broadway 
success, "Autumn Garden," with Fredric 
March and Florence Eldridge — for which 
she got the Drama Critics' Award — and all 
these experiences contributed to her new 
philosophy about herself and her life. 

"I stopped depreciating myself, as I had 
done in my teens. I knew my own limita- 
tions, of course. I was and am aware of 
most of them, I think. But I didn't invent 
a lot of new limitations which I then had 
to overcome. I went into things knowing 
I could do well because I had the experi- 
ence and the other requirements. It was 
a whole new life opening up for me, and 
I believe that anyone, no matter what his 
job, can do well if he thinks he can. This 
way, you can give the best of yourself to 
everything you do." 

As Joan talks about this new philosophy 
of hers, her w^ords are full of eagerness, 
but there is an underlying dignity and 
calm, too. "I have taken off for Europe 
three times recently," she says. "I began 
to understand that it is foolish to get your 
mind so consumed with the idea that you 
must be an extraordinary success, that you 
must accomplish certain things in a certain 
time — and, because of them, neglect the 
wonderful people and places there are to 
know. I like acting. I think it is a fine 
way to earn a better-than-average living — " 
and I couldn't do anything else, even if it 
were not — but it is a job, and you can stay 
too close to it, just as you can to any other 
job you may do. 

"Not everyone can drop everything and 
go far away, but almost everyone can get 
some short breaks during the year. Even 
a weekend that's completely different, right 
in your own community." 

Joan laughs at this point and breaks 
into her own train of thought. "I know 
all these things and I know they are true, 
and if I could follow them all the time I 
would be in great shape! But there are 
times when I can't. I often get nervous and 
upset — just before doing a television broad- 
cast, for instance. And then it occurs to 
me that if the show is on from, say, seven 
to eight, then by one minute past eight 
everybody will be watching another show. 
If I'm not as good as I wanted to be, at 
least I have tried. 

"What I mean is that if you are nervous 
about something you have to do, the 
quicker you can get relaxed about it, the 
better. Getting intense only makes it 
worse." 

Apparently her own advice does work 
for her, because she has been so busy on 
radio and TV, since moving into a new 
apartment last November, that she is only 
now beginning to furnish the living room. 
It's a big white room, with wonderful pos- 



sibilities. Little reminders of an Oriental 
childhood are here, in a blue and white 
Chinese tea jar covered with sprays of 
blossoms, in a plant trained in a fanciful 
shape like the kind you see in old prints 
from the East, in an ash tray shaped like 
a fish. There are more of these things, 
soon to emerge from big packing cases 
stored away. 

The kitchen is Joan's great love, because 
she has a passion for cooking, especially 
exotic dishes for which she buys the in- 
gredients in New York's Chinatown. May- 
be this is why she now has to watch her 
figure and occasionally go on a diet to keep 
her weight down near a hundred pounds 
or a little more. "It's unpleasant for me 
to diet," she says. "It takes all the fun 
out of cooking. Some of the time I can 
lose weight quickly because I am busy — 
I find I don't think about food when I'm 
working hard." 

? haring the little two-floor apartment — 
and sole master of the little yard — is her 
brown French poodle, Bursche (which 
means "Rascal" in German). Bursche 
came from Venice, although Joan had no 
idea of carting a dog around Europe and 
bringing him home with her, the night she 
went into one of her favorite little restau- 
rants with a friend. "We were having din- 
ner, and I noticed a little brown fur ball 
rolling around the floor. I couldn't even 
see a face and paws. The proprietor saw 
me watching the puppy — which is what 
the brown ball turned out to be — and asked 
me if I liked it. 'It's my daughter's dog, 
and she can't keep it,' he told me. 'Do you 
want it?' I thought, what will I do with a 
puppy while I'm traveling? And what — 
when I get home? I sometimes leave early 
in the morning and don't get bSck until 
after a late show. I couldn't take him. It 
would be impossible! 

"Then I said I would come back, after 
thinking about it, and give him my deci- 
sion. My friend and I left and I thought 
and thought during our walk, but I still 
couldn't make up my mind. I wanted the 
puppy very much, but I didn't think it 
would be fair to a dog to be shut up in an 
apartment. Who would feed him during 
the day and see that he got outdoors regu- 
larly? (I didn't have this garden apartment 
then.) But all the time we were walking, 
I thought of that funny little brown ball 
and how much I wanted him. 

"As we came back into the restaurant, 
I heard the proprietor talking to someone 
else about Bursche. 'If you want him, you 
had better take him,' he was saying just 
as I came in. 'Just a minute,' I heard my- 
self say. 'That's my dog.' " 

So now the Lorring household consists 
of one intensely alive young actress, trying 
hard to be a philosopher^and most of the 
time succeeding — and one intensely alive 
French poodle whose only philosophy is 
to romp riotously indoors and out and to 
expect every package to contain, if not 
actual food, at least a new rubber bone. 

As for romance, well, she was heard to 
say not long ago she wanted to marry, 
have a lot of children, and live 'way out 
in the country, away from all that makes 
her life so exciting. You don't quite believe 
she means this, except for the part about 
marriage and children. You don't believe 
she would be content away from her job 
for too long a time. But, if she does mean 
it, then you can count on her doing it. If 
she should decide that true happiness lies 
that way, then — unlike Grace Sargent, 
whose decisions are impulsive ones — Joan 
Lorring would make hers quietly. And be 
happy with the path she had chosen. 



Laughter's the Word for Link 



(Continued from page 55) 
French poodles, and one talkative taxi 
driver to make me realize that Art Link- 
letter was a wonderful guy and a down-to- 
earth good sport. 

The Jell-O incident, for example, was 
one of the first jokes on Art I remember 
that showed me what a good sport he was. 
Art is an early riser. Gets up at the crack 
of dawn, starts singing before he gets to 
the shower, and continues to sing like a 
bird in the shower. 

You can count on Link's singing to wake 
the town — and all of us. The rest of us 
don't get up the way Art does. We don't 
think it's healthy. One day when we were 
on tour with the People Are Funny show, 
we thought we'd teach Art to stay in bed 
a bit longer. 

We were staying at a hotel in Denver 
(won't mention the name, as they may still 
be looking for us), when one of the writ- 
ers, who likes to sleep late, came up with 
an idea we thought was very funny — and 
educational, for Art. 

We went to the nearest super-market 
and bought a case of Jello-0. We stored 
this in the next room until Link came in 
that night (after a big dirmer with the 
sponsor) ; then we waited patiently at the 
adjoining door until we heard good solid 
snores playing out a heavy tune in the 
bedroom. With Art fast asleep, we tip- 
toed in, and package by package dumped 
the contents of the whole case into the 
bathtub. Then we turned on the hot water, 
slowly stirring the brew. Finally, our 
evil deed done, we stealthily crept out, and 
let the gelatine and the cool Denver night 
air do the rest. 

We didn't sleep much that night with the 
anticipation of what was to come. In the 
morning we were all up bright and early 
(for a change), waiting for the reaction we 
knew would follow. It did. 

Art got up on schedule. Started singing 
before he got to his bath, and suddenly his 
voice went up to a high C with a sort of 
"Yip." Then everything got quiet. This 
worried us. When we broke in we found 
him sitting on the edge of the tub, pointing 
at the shimmering ocean of strawberry 
Jell-O and doubled over with silent laugh- 
ter. He was nearly hysterical! He couldn't 
say anything, let alone sing! It took us all 
morning to quiet him down and, during the 
show that afternoon, he continued to break 
out with short grunts of laughter for no 
particular reason. 

In the end the joke was on us. For weeks 
after that Art got up fifteen minutes earlier 
to make sure he didn't have to stand up to 
his knees in Jell-O when he took his morn- 
ing shower! 

I've rarely seen Link really mad. It's not 
that he's just easygoing, but that he has an 
amazing knack for understanding people. 
Especially his staff. In the six years I've 
worked with him, he's bawled me out 
twice. Each time, I deserved it. After I'd 
made a mistake, Link called me into his 
office, let me have it fair and square, then — 
as if he were almost sorry he'd done it- 
asked me in that friendly manner, "Say, did 
I tell you the funny thing that happened to 
me last week — " 

Link's honesty with another person is 
only equaled by his curiosity. About every- 
thing. People especially. When he meets a 
stranger, the newcomer often thinks he's 
being interviewed for People Are Funny, 
because Art asks a million questions. 

"Oh, so you work for a milk company? 
Do you drive a truck? What are your 
hours? So early? Do you have nice people 
on yo\ir route?" 

Link's curiosity can hand him a laugh, 
too. Like the time we were in Kansas City 



on a tour. "Wanna take a ride?" he asked 
me, "I'd like to see some of the city." 

So we hopped in a cab and told the driver 
to just "ride us around." Before we could 
open our mouths, the driver started talking. 
He talked for two solid hours, driving us 
through the city. He was a one-man Gallup 
poll. 

Seems he'd seen our show and was tell- 
ing us all about it. Since it was dark when 
we'd hailed the cab, the driver had no 
chance of seeing Link's face and had no 
idea who he was. 

"And that Linkletter," said the cabbie. 

"Yea," from Art in the back seat, "what 
did you think of him?" 

He told us. Fortunately (for our pride's 
sake) he was a fan. He also had a lot of 
good ideas and suggestions about the show. 
Link was pumping him for all he was 
worth and listening to every criticism he 
offered. That's Link for you, he listens to 
what you have to say — me, a cab driver, 
or anybody. 

"Thanks," he said seriously to the driver, 
when we arrived back at our hotel. "I 
learned a lot — about the town, that is." 

It was then I learned something about 
Art. "You took it good-naturedly," I 
kidded, "how come you didn't tell him who 
you were?" 

"Oh, no," Art replied quickly, "that 
would have embarrassed him. Besides, he 
did me a big favor. Only goes to prove what 
I've always said — I never met a person I 
didn't find interesting. Will Rogers used to 
say he never met a person he didn't like. 
Well, I say I like them all — also, I find them 
interesting, and oftentimes very informa- 
tive." 

I think that's why Art's able to get so 
much out of every association, no matter 
how casual. Though once I saw his phil- 
osophy take a funny twist. But even here 
he made the best of it. 

We were in Louisville, having played to 
a tremendous audience. After the show. 
Art left the stage and headed for the main 
floor. I remember looking down and seeing 
about 2,000 howling, hysterical women 
waiting to receive him with open arms. I 
remember thinking at the time that this 
was a downright daingerous thing to do. 

It was. Art had no sooner gotten into 
their midst than the women started pull- 
ing buttons off his coat, handkerchief out 
of his pocket, the tie from around his neck 
— all for souvenirs! Art tried to escape, but 
too late. I saw him turning up a blind alley 
beside the theatre at a dead run, the women 
not far behind, I ran for help. I came 
back with the police and there was Art 
pinned against the wall by his mob of de- 
voted fans. They had all the buttons, plus 
one sleeve, and were beginning on his shirt 
when we finally rescued him. 

"I couldn't believe it was happening," he 
said. "And of all people — to me!" He looked 
down at his ruined suit. "People," he said, 
"they're reaUy interesting, aren't they. You 
never know what they're going to do. I 
love 'em all. Aren't they wonderful!" 

It's true, I thought. You never know 
what people are going to do. They are won- 
derful. But if they had ruined my suit I 
would have made 'em buy me a new one, 
or I would have gone to the Chamber of 
Commerce. But not Art. 

Link is the kind of man who usually 
keeps his emotions under control. He feels 
things deeply, like the rest of us, but he's 
learned to control himself. Once in Boston, 
however, his feelings got the better of him. 

Our performance that night was to be a 
charity affair with the proceeds going to a 
famed children's hospital there. For one 
stunt, a cute little girl and bright young 
boy were vying for a French poodle. (We 



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really had two pups, one for each, but the 
children didn't know it). Link told them 
that he'd flown the poodle specially from 
Hollywood and one of the kiddies could 
have it, depending on which child the 
poodle went to. 

Link brought the dog onto the stage and 
both children were open-mouthed with de- 
light. "Oh," cried the little girl. "Ah," 
sighed the little boy. The poodle turned to- 
ward the little girl. 

The crushed look of disappointment upon 
the little boy's face was heartbreaking. 
With each bouncy step of the puppy, the 
boy's face grew longer and longer. Finally 
his eyes filled with tears. Art hadn't ex- 
pected this, and when he saw the little boy 
his eyes filled with tears, too. It wasn't un- 
til Art had gone out into the wings to get 
the other little poodle, given it to the little 
boy, and seen the wonderful light of sur- 
prise and happiness on his face, that Art 
was able to control his own emotions. 

Art is proud of our organization, but the 
job of getting those two poodles to Boston 
from Hollywood was a joke on all of us. 

Art and I had arranged to meet the plane 
at eight p.m. the night before the show. 
Link and I and a photographer and a 
newspaper reporter piled into a car about 
7:30 and drove out to the airport. 

When we got there, we learned that the 
pups had been bumped off the plane and 
were now scheduled to arrive at midnight. 
We went back to town to wait. At twelve 
midnight we went back to the airport, our 
eyes searching in vain the ranks of de- 
scending passengers. No dogs! They'd been 
bumped at Buffalo this time. For sure, the 
airline informed us, they'd be in at six a.m. 
the next morning. 

A bunch of weary reporters, photogra- 
phers, one Art Linkletter, and one Dick 
Pettit drove back to Boston to wait until 



six A.M. At the appointed hour we were 
back on the spot, waiting for the plane and 
dogs. None of us could believe it when we 
were informed the dogs had been bumped 
at Syracuse! 

It was a small miracle in my opinion that 
we all did show up for the supposed eight- 
thirty A.M. arrival. But we did. We were 
rather sleepy-eyed and slowed down when 
the dogs did arrive. Of course, they'd had 
a good night's sleep and were full of pep. 
I'm afraid we were no match for them. 
When the reporters asked Link what he 
had to say, he came up with, "I think our 
organization is going to the dogs." 

Link's humor is never more keen than 
when the joke is on him. One day he said 
to the staff, 'How come the rest of these 
radio emcees command such respect from 
their crew? I don't hear any of you ever 
calling me 'sir.' " 

That did it! We called him "sir" every 
other breath, all week long. "Mr. Linklet- 
ter, sir, would you step a little closer to 
that microphone, sir?" 

"Thank you, Mr. Linkletter, sir, for your 
kind attention to my wishes, sir." 

We even carried the "sir" business onto 
the Art Linkletter's House Party and 
People Are Fimny shows. "Okay, gang," 
Link grinned, "I've had enough. I give up." 

Today, if one of us dared to "sir" him, I 
think he'd hit us with the nearest piece of 
furniture. 

So working with Art Linkletter is a lot 
of laughs. But not the kind of laughs you 
get from a comedian, continually "on 
stage." The kind of laughs we share are 
born in the camaraderie, the good times, the 
imderstanding we all have for one another. 
Linkletter's curiosity, good sportsmanship, 
and his interest in other people all add up 
to — one swell boss! 



Front Page Farrell's Wife 



(Continued from page 70) 
into it, children from overseas who need a 
home like ours. We're hoping to have some 
of our own. We're hoping to make it, and 
keep it, a real home." 

No one can be sure of the exact age of 
the original three-room house that forms 
the nucleus of what is now called six 
rooms but is actually more than that, be- 
cause the rooms are on several levels and 
there are interesting little hallways up- 
stairs and downstairs. When Andy tore 
out some old walls he found beams marked 
with Roman numerals, a custom of the 
community "house-raisings" in that part of 
the country before 1650. Some rooms were 
added from time to time, presumably as 
families of later residents grew larger and 
more space was needed. 

The things that have gone into the house 
are the treasures that Florence and Andy 
cherish, some of them happy mementoes 
of the past, now being woven into the pat- 
tern of the present and the future. The 
Steinway grand piano which Florence's 
father gave her when she was sixteen and 
preparing for a career as a concert pianist. 
Her mother's collection of antique china 
and glass from their old home in St. Louis. 
The eggshell demitasse cups her mother 
bought at the St. Louis Exposition, when 
she was a bride. 

Until this year, the main furnishings of 
the house had been crates, tools, lumber, 
and a few essential pieces of furniture, all 
heavily coated with plaster dust. "My 
next-door neighbors, Min and Smokey — 
they are really Wilhemina and Niles, but 
no one calls them by those names — have 
been so cute," Florence says. "About once 
a week they would pick their way through 
the dust and the mess and confusion to 



visit us. Daytimes their children, Allan 
and Judy, would come over to see if they 
could do anything to help. All our neigh- 
bors have been simply wonderful, and we 
are happy to be part of the community." 

Only three rooms had been in use for a 
long time before the Marshalls took over 
the house, and even those were in a rather 
sorry state. Paint was peeling, plaster was 
stained and cracked, floors a mess. Andy 
understood enough about such things to 
pitch right in and start the work of re- 
habilitation. He could help the plumber, 
and could plan new electrical wiring. He 
put a window back in the kitchen which 
someone had removed years before. He 
raised every possible doorway to get his 
six-foot-three frame through it without 
having to duck every time. (He still has 
to duck a couple of doorways that couldn't 
be made higher.) Florence wielded the 
electric burner and sanded off every speck 
of old paint around doors and windows. 

They decided to combine two rooms and 
make one big living room, and one Friday 
night she came home after the broadcast 
to find the wall broken down and the house 
showered with white dust, at which point 
she decided they never would get the place 
livable again. But they did — and now the 
big room is dusty pink and gray-green; the 
floors are waxed to rich mellowness, and 
the woodwork is smooth and white. The 
old oak boarding that forms the ceiling has 
been painted white also, but the rough- 
hewn uprights of solid oak have been left 
their natural color. They outline a sort of 
"picture window" effect — without glass — 
between the little dining room and the 
big double living room, an unusual and 
beautiful touch. 

Andy believes in putting first things 



first, such as growing enough vegetables to 
fill their deep-freeze all diuring the winter 
months. Florence, who couldn't bear to see 
blackberries going to waste, has rows of 
tempting jars which testify to what she did 
about it. 

Right now Andy and Florence have only 
two dogs, described as "thoroughbred 
mutts" — and would like to have more 
animals. One dog is a fox-terrier named 
Zannie, short for Alexandria. The other 
is Zannie's part-German-shepherd daugh- 
ter, named Cleopatra because as a puppy 
she was at once a minx and a Sphinx. She 
now answers just as fast to her nickname 
of Snoozy, though it's quite a comedown. 
Zannie attached herself to them when 
Andy was staging a pageant in Alexan- 
dria, Virginia. Florence joined him for the 
weekend and was given the job of seeing 
that the puppy came on for just one scene 
and stayed out of all the others. "At first 
I was a bit disconcerted at being nurse- 
maid to a frisky puppy, but by the third 
day I had fallen in love with her. We tried 
to give her to someone who would promise 
a good home, but we were sort of happy 
when no one came along, so we brought 
her back to New York. She's the smartest, 
sweetest dog I ever had and has now pro- 
duced three litters of puppies that are 
just as sweet as she is. All but Cleopatra 
have been given to other people who love 
them." 

How Florence, a girl who started life as 
a musician, became a successful radio 
actress was really due to — stage fright! 
Back in St. Louis, where she was born, 
she was known as a Uttle girl who would 
get up and recite at the drop of a lollipop. 
When she was around eight, she spent the 
winter with her grandparents and an 
aunt in Shreveport, Louisiana, who taught 
music. "I stayed on and went to school in 
Shreveport and began an education that 
included music and dramatic art. Every- 
thing went along fine, until I was sixteen 
and ready to give my first solo concert. 
Technically, I was ready. But when the 
time came for me to walk out on the big 
stage I had the most awful case of stage 
fright. I was so scared I could hardly 
catch my breath. I got through it, but I 
decided then that this was something 1 
couldn't face for the rest of my life. 

"My father agreed to let me apprentice 
at a summer theatre in New England, and 
if I wanted to go on with acting after that 
(which he doubted — he hoped it would 
cure me of being stagestruck) he promised 
to pay my way for a year at a good dra- 
matic school in New York. It was like play 
to me, all that summer. I disappointed my 
father by loving it, and by being encour- 
aged by playwrights and producers to 
continue. That fall I enrolled in the 
American Academy of Dramatic Arts, was 
happy to be invited back the next year, 
but took instead the offer of a job in the 
Goodman Theatre in Chicago, feeling that 
this fine repertory company would give me 
more of the experience I needed." 

Up to this point it had been easy sailing, 
but young and eager actresses seemed to 
be a dime a dozen on Broadway when 
Florence returned to New York. "I did 
everything but act, for a while, just to 
keep going," she admits now. "My parents 
wanted me to come home and even held off 
sending my winter coat so I would have 
to come and get it. One morning a light 
snow fell in New York and I decided that, 
in order to stay on, I would have to spend 
the last thirty-five dollars in my old ac- 
count in a St. Loiiis bank. I found a coat 
for jiist that amount in a department store, 
but when the floor manager saw an out-of- 
. town check he refused to take it. Finally 
i I landed in the president's office, insisting 
B the money was right there in St. Louis. I 
■ must have looked very honest, or verv 

L 



naive, because I walked out wearing the 
coat. After that, my parents were recon- 
ciled to my being an actress." 

"Everything but acting" for Florence 
included such things as using her sewing 
ability to make things for the other girls, 
as well as holding her own wardrobe to- 
gether. She demonstrated dolls at Macy's 
department store, and was just beginning 
a course in Christmas selling when she got 
a chance to read for her first Broadway 
role, as the young girl in "Maedchen in 
Uniform." The play lasted only a short 
time, but the notices had been good, and 
one opportunity led to another. She 
played in "The Joyous Season," "The Old 
Maid," and "Call It a Day." During the 
run of "The Old Maid" she was called for 
some radio parts on the Sigmund Rom- 
berg Hour, and later she got leads on Roses 
And Drums. "Just handed to me like that, 
and I didn't value them highly enough. 
Radio seemed like a by-product to me 
then, not a career in itself, although I liked 
it very much." 

After she had played the daughter in 
"The Little Foxes," with Tallulah Bank- 
head — a notable Broadway success — the 
serious illness of Florence's father took her 
away from New York for several months. 
Out in Minnesota, at the Mayo Clinic 
where her father was being treated, she 
began to realize the importance radio had 
for many people who saw very little "live" 
theatre. She not only appreciated radio 
more from an audience standpoint, but she 
began to think of it for herself as a means 
of greater financial security than the stage 
had to offer. And she remembered that peo- 
ple had liked her on radio. 

"I sat down and wrote sixty-six letters 
to various people who might be interested 
in knowing I wanted to make radio acting 
my profession, and I asked each one for 
an audition. Ten answered me, and three 
contained offers of immediate auditions. 
I almost spoiled my chances on my first 
NBC program, by being terribly nervous. 
The director had faith in me and proved it 
by using me over and over again. Finally, 
I had the good luck to audition with Dick 
Widmark for roles in Front Page Farrell, 
and we both got the jobs we auditioned for. 
I became Sally and Dick was David, until 
he went to Hollywood to make movies. I 
have stayed on, for eight years, loving 
every minute of it." 

David Farrell is now played by Staats 
Cotsworth, who is almost as well known 
now as a painter as he is as an actor. In 
the dining room of the Marshall house is 
one of Staats' handsome water colors, done 
one afternoon when he was a weekend 
visitor. It shows the kitchen- ell view of the 
house and the old pximp next to it. 

The day Florence and Andy were mar- 
ried, she had to go right on to the studio 
after the ceremony to do the show. Staats, 
noticing she was more dressed up than 
usual and eyeing her corsage, asked: 
"Where have you been? To a wedding?" 
She smiled a Uttle, and said "Uh-huh." 
"Anybody I know?" he continued. She 
nodded, murmxired "Uh-huh" again. "Well, 
whose?" he asked. "Mine," she said, faintly. 

Maybe she wasn't quite sure even then 
that it had really happened. Maybe she 
thought it was just too good to be true. 
To have Andy, and their dream of a house 
that would soon come true, and their first 
Christmas together in it. The memory of 
that first Christmas, by the way is still very 
green — in the form of the first little tree 
they ever trimmed together, now planted 
in their side yard "It pleases me to see it 
doing so well," Florence says. 

The tree, the marriage, the house that is 
now a home. All of them doing very, very 
well! 




your hair needs LOVALON 




For gayer, brighter, more colorful 
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the shade for] 
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25^ for 6 rinses 



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97 




Photo by Black Star 



Is a Wedding Ring a Luxury? 



1 our government says Yes ! And taxes you twenty 
per cent for being in love. 

Your wedding ring — a tube of lipstick — -a bottle of 
cologne — the movie you see on Saturday night — the 
long-distance phone call you make to your mother — 
the wallet you take your pay home in — even President 
Eisenhower's briefcase — all these, Washington treats 
as luxuries. 

These things, and a long list of others — cosmetics, 
jewelry, leather goods, entertainment — that are part of 
your every-day life are burdened with a heavy excise 
tax that takes up to twenty per cent — in some cases 
even more — over the price you really pay for the object 
itself out of your pocket. 

That extra percentage would pay the fare on the bus 
that gets you to the (taxed) movie, or buy you an ice 
cream soda afterward. It would leave you enough after 
you've bought a bottle of (taxed) cologne to pay for 
three pounds of potatoes — enough after you've bought 



a (taxed) new purse to buy you a pair of gloves to 
match it. 

Or, if you chose to put what you would save into 
the bank, you could build yourself a holiday-size nest 
egg, or have enough at the end of a year for a solid 
down payment on an electric dishwasher. 

Last year, on an average, every man, woman and child 
in the United States spent $58.49 in federal excise taxes. 
And if you bought more than the average, you paid 
out much more! 

Congress would like to do something about this situa- 
tion. And with your help it can. 

Take two cents out of all the money you'll be saving, 
buy a postal card and send it to your Congressman. 
Ask him to cast his vote for repeal or reduction of excise 
taxes. Just write the words: Vote Yes on Bill HR-5! 

And write those words right now! 

The Editors of Radio-TV Mirror 



98 



RUN A PORTABLE DRESS SHOP THAT 
CAN EARN YOU ri50°o IN A MONTH! 



At one time or another, what 
woman hasn't thought it would 
be "fim" to run a dress shop? 
Well, here's your chance to do ex- 
actly that — without disturbing 
your normal daily routine, with- 
out cluttering up your home with 
space-consuming "stock". Here's 
a down-to-earth, money -making 
opportunity for women of any age 
—and without any business back- 
ground. You can go into this in- 
teresting business without laying 
out a single penny of your own 
money in advance. The only re- 
quirement is spare time! Fashion 
Frocks supplies everything else 
you need to set yourself up in a 
profitable dress business that can 
bring you up to $150 in a month. 




Your Customers Choose From 
Nearly 150 Styles and Fabrics! 




Imagine a "Dress Shop" you 
can tuck under your arm and 
take right along with you to 
luncheons, bridge parties, church 
a£Fairs — or even to the corner 
grocery. That's the way Fashion 
Frocks' Portable "Dress Shop" 
works. You simply show exqui- 
site Fashion Frocks to friends and 
neighbors, relatives and acquaint- 
ances at any time that suits your 
convenience. 

When women discover how 
easy it is to order these stimning 



styles through you . . . when they 
see the rich fabrics, warm flatter- 
ing colors, and the dazzling array 
of weaves and patterns . . . they 
simply won't be able to pass your 
"Dress Shop" by! Your customers 
will choose from classic suits, 
casual sports-wear, dressy two- 
piecers — all such outstanding 
values that many will buy 3 and 
4 at a time. Your Fashion Frocks' 
"Dress Shop" features a complete 
range of sizes, too . . . Misses, 
Half-Sizes, Juniors, Stouts. 



Coupon Brings You This Portable 
Profitable "Dress Shop"! 

Fill out the coupon below and mail it in." 
Fashion Frocks will send your portable "Dress 
Shop" ON APPROVAL. You'll get a magnificent 
Presentation Portfolio showing over 150 Fashion 
Frocks, at prices every woman can afford. Style cards 
in color, complete with swatches that demonstrate 
the exact quality, color, weave and pattern of the 
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yours ON APPROVAL. But don't delay or you may 
be disappointed. Openings are definitely limited! 

FASHION FROCKS, INC. 

(Dress Shop Division) 
3325 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati 25/ Ohio 



Your Own Lovely Clothes Cost You Nothing! 

On top of the thrill of operating your own dress 
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PASTE THIS COUPON ON POSTCARD MAIL TODAY' 



FASHION FROCKS, INC. (Dress Shop Division) 
3325 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati 25, Ohio 

Please send me by mail the complete Fashion Frocks' Portable "Dress 
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to earn up to $150 in a month. 



I 



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a shampoo that 






Why not wear stars tonight? All it takes is one quick 
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will put you in seventh heaven ! 

New magic formula . . . milder than castile! 

There's silkening magic in Drene's new lightning-quick lather! No 
other lather is so thick, yet so quick — even in hardest water! 

Magic . . . this new lightning-quick lather . . . because it flashes 
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hair bright as silk, smooth as silk, soft as silk. And so obedient. 

Just try this luxurious new Drene with its lightning-quick 
lather ... its new and fresh fragrance. You have an exciting 
experience coming! 



A NEW EXPERIENCE . . . 
See your hair left silky bright! 
This new formula flashes into 
lightning-quick lather — milder 
than castile ! No other lather 
is so cji/ic/c, yet so thicic! 



•I 

I 




^mi^SSSS&m^. 



New Lightning Lather—- 

a magic new formula that silkens your hair. 

Milder than castile— 

so mild you could use Drene every day ! 



"■"*"• "jjgjlijjgp''' 



This is a 

Drene : 

A PRODUCT OF PROCTER & GAMBLE 



RAniO'TV 



;.:■*!« 



ew stories on: 
RTHUR GODFREY 
OAGY CARMICHAEL 
ERT PARKS 
fU CULLEN 



Idio, TV listings 



Eddie Fisher 
His Own Life Story 



,-tfr: 



Ted Mack ■ 

Mr. Amateur Hour 



Lu Ann Simms, 

Arthur Godfrey's 

Songstress 



^ 




^ -^r 



m. 



,,jj*'' 






m. 



ICeM// 



a shampoo that 






I love it, I love it — how my hair shines. So-o-o silky to 
touch, so silky bright. One shampoo with the new Drene^ 
that's every last thing I did to make it so silky. 

^ew magic formula . . . milder than castile! 

There's siikening magic in Drene's new lightning-quick lather! 
No other lather is so thick, yet so quick — even in hardest water! 

Magic . . . this new lightning-quick lather . . . because it flashes 
up like lightning, because it rinses out like lightning, because 
it's milder than castile! Magic! because this new formula leaves 
your hair bright as silk, smooth as silk, soft as silk. And so 
wonderfully obedient. 

Just see how this luxurious new Drene silkens your hair! You 
liave an exciting experience coming! 




New Lightning Latiier— a magic new formula 
that silkens your hair . . . Milder than castile— 

so mild you could use Drene every day! 

This is a jUffi^ Drene ! 



A PRODUCT OF PROCTER 8. GAMBLE 



r 



Important- especially If you can't brush after everg meal ! 

New Ipana^ De^roys Decay 
and Bad-Breafh Bacteria 







B^en ong brushing can stop bad breath all day! 

Everg brushing fights tooth decay! 




Clean sweet breath -even after eating 

*In tests, new Ipana stopped most cases of unpleasant 
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except foods like onions and garlic, which cause odors 
from the stomach. 



Dentists say it's best to brush your 
teeth after every meal . . . and we 
agree. But when this is inconvenient, 
you can still get wonderful results 
with new white Ipana. 

For instance, when you use Ipana in 
the morning, you don't have to worry 
about your breath for up to 9 hours 
. . . even after eating or smoking. Tests 
by an independent laboratory proved it. 
What's more, every brushing with 
new Ipana fights tooth decay. It re- 
moves bacteria that form the acids that 
eat into your teeth and cause cavities. 
So to fight tooth decay effectively, use 



new Ipana regularly — after meals when 
you can. 

And here's how to take care of your 
gums before gum troubles start. Brush- 
ing your teeth with new Ipana from 
gum margins toward biting edges helps 
remove irritants that can lead to gum 
troubles. 

With all these benefits, Ipana now 
has a new, more refreshing flavor. 
Thousands of families who tried new 
Ipana liked it 2 to 1 for taste. 

We're sure you and your children 
will like it, too. Why not try a tube 
of new, white Ipana today? Look for 
the yellow-and-red striped carton. 



New, Whfk- 




art^ 





Product of Bristol-Myers 



Student nurses are needed . . 
Inquire at your hospital. 



'jJlonBSurePuWyf 
" HOnTheUne* 



DONTSOUNOOFFFOR 
THE NEIGHBORS, jean! 

■ just tell me what i do 
wrong-andiIlfixit! 



ASK OUR DENTIST HOW ^ 

TO FIX BAD BREATH, 

'jack! I'm SORRY, HONEY, 

BUT THAT'S IT! 



■ ONE BRUSHING WITH COLGATE DENTAL^ 

CREAM REMOVES UP TO 85% OF THE BACTERIA THAT 

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COLGATE'S INSTANTLY STOPS BAD BREATH IN 7 OUT 

OF 10 CASES THAT ORIGINATE IN THE MOUTH! 



Just one brushing with Colgate's removes up to 
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LATER— Thanks to Colgate Dental Cream 




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GIVES YOU A CLiANER, 
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AUGUST, 1953 RADIO-TV MIRKUK VOL. 40. NO. 3 

Contents 

Keystone Edition 

Ann Higginbotham, Editor Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Betty Freedman, Editorial Assistant Joan Clarke, Art Assistant 

Maryanne Crofton, Editorial Assistant Betty Mills, West Coast Editor 

Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chiej 



people on the air 

What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 4 

Who's Who on the American Music Hall (Burgess Meredith, Nancv 

Kenyon, Larry Douglas ) 10 

A Day with Robert 0- Lewis (RTVM contest winner Helen \1 Haaland) 18 

Florian ZaBach 21 

Arthur Godfrey's Little Miss Miracle (Lu Ann Simms)..by Anne Candy 27 

Mr. Amateur Hour (Ted Mack) by Arthur Norris 30 

Be True to Yourself (Garry Moore) by Gregory Merwin 32 

Courageous Is the Word for Arthur Godfrey by Philip Chapman 34 

The Road Of Life (Virginia Dwyer and Don MacLaughlin) 36 

Hoagy Carmichael Is Like This by Pauline Swanson 38 

Lili Darvas — Heavenly Homebody by Mary Temple 40 

Faith Bleaks The Bank by Mrs. George F. Hart 52 

Life Can Be Beautiful (complete episode in pictures) 54 

Teens Are a Time to Learn (Joey Walsh) by Elizabeth Ball 60 

Meta's Guiding Light (Ellen Demming) by Frances Kish 62 

The Brighter Day (Bill Smith, Mary K. Wells, Phillip Pine) 64 

Our Mutual Friends (Bruce Eliot and Dan McCuUough) 66 

Somewhere I'll Find Him (a Lorenzo Jones novelette)... .by Belle Jones 84 



features in full color 

Love Lives With Millie (Elena Verdugo) by Betty Goode 42 

Eddie Fisher's Life Story by Chris Kane 44 

Easy to Live With— and Fun! (Bill CuUen) by Martin Cohen 48 

Bert Parks— "I'm the Average Man" by Gladys Hall 50 



your local station 

Good Night Little Redheads (WOR) 8 

Nightbeat with Rowzie (WWDC) 12 

Some People Call It Madness (WIP) 14 

Weather or Not (WKBW) 24 



inside radio and TV 

Daytime Diary 16 

Information Booth 22 

Inside Radio (program listings ) 75 

TV Program Highlights 77 

Cover portrait of Lu Ann Simms by Ozzie Sweet 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Macfadden Publications, Inc.. New 

Yorit, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE, ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 

205 East 42nd Street. New YorJt, N. Y. Editorial Brancix 
Offices: 321 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calit., and 
221 North La Salle Street, Chicago. III. Harold A. Wise, 
Chairman of the Board; Irving S. Manhelmer. President; 
Fred R. Sammis. Vice President: Mever Dworkin, Secretary 
and Treasurer. Advertising omces also In Chicago and San 
Franoisco. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.50 one year, U. S. and Posses- 
sions. Canada $.3.00 per year. $5.50 per year for all other 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: 6 weeks' notice essential. When pos- 
sible, please furnish stencil impression address from a re- 
cent issue. Addiess changes can be made only if you send us 
vour old as well as your new addiess. Write to Radio-TV 
Mirror. 205 Rast 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 
MANUSCRIPTS; All manuacriptfi will be carefully considered. 

Member of The TRUR 



but publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. It 
is advisable to keep a dtiplicate copy for your records. Only 
those manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self-addressea 
return envelopes or with sufficient return postage will be 
returned. 

FOREIGN editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street. New York 17, 
N. Y. Irving S. Manheimer, President; Douglas Lockhart, 
Vice President. 

Re-entered as Second Class Matter, Oct. 5, 1951, at the 
Post Office at New York, N. Y.. under the Act of March 3. 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail, P.O. Dept.. Ottawa, 
Ont. , Canada. Copyright 1953 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. 
All rights reserved under International Copyright Conventioiu-J 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Convun- J 
tion. Todos derechos resei-vados segun La Convencion Pan-* 
Americana de Propiedad Literaria y Artistica. Title trademark 
registered in U. 3. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Co. 
STORY Women's Group 







c^voe- 



Vxome with a'ftUO 



aav^a ^"^^ ^°^^ ^'^ 



%^/ 



Yu'o bright girls on vacation. 
Tess was the one who men 
ignored . . . Martha the one 
they adored. So, all Tess got 
was a tan, hut Martha came home 
with a man . . . and a ring 
on her finger! Moral: If yoit want 
to he popular don't tolerate that 
insidious thing'^ one moment. 
Listerine Antiseptic not only 
stofs '^halitosis (had breath) 
instantly . . . it usually keeps it 
stopped for hours on end. This 
superior deodorant effect is due to 
Listerine's ability to kill germs. 

No chlorophyll kills odor bacteria 
like this . . . instantly 

Isn't it just common sense then to trust 
to Listerine Antiseptic when you want 
to be extra-careful not to offend? You 
see, germs are by far the most common 
cause of halitosis. Because they start 
the fermentation of proteins that are 
always present in your mouth. In fact, 
research shows that your breath stays sweeter 
longer depending upon the degree to which 
you reduce germs in your mouth. Listerine 
instantly kills these germs by millions, 
including the bacteria that cause fer- 




LISTERINE STOPS BAD BREATH 

4 times better than chlorophyll or tooth paste 



mentation. Brushing your teeth doesn't 
give you any such antiseptic protection. 
Chlorophyll or chewing gums do not 
kill germs. Listerine does. 

Clinically proved four times 
better than tooth paste 

No wonder that in recent 
clinical tests Listerine Anti- 
septic averaged four times 
better in reducing breath 
odors than the two leading 
tooth pastes, as well as the 
three leading chlorophyll 




products, it was tested against. 

So, if you want really effective pro- 
tection against halitosis, no matter what 
else you may use, use an 
antiseptic . . . Listerine An- 
tiseptic. Kill those odor bac- 
teria with Listerine. Rinse 
with it night and morning, 
and before any date where 
you want to be at your best. 

"Even your best friend 
won't tell you!" 



LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC • • • the most widery used antiseptic in the world 



what's new from Coast 




Walter O'Keefe Is back in business again with his new CBS show. 




Can Bon^ ^ 
Maybe yo"^ 



By JILL WARREN 



4 



SUMMER replacement time is here 
again, and this year the networks 
and sponsors have come up with 
many interesting shows, so there should 
be enough variety to please everyone. 
First off, NBC is presenting an auspi- 
cious two-hour radio program on Sat- 
urday nights called New Talent, U.S.A. 
It is being produced in collaboration 
with NBC affiliated stations all over 
the country, with four different sta- 
tions broadcasting half-hour segments 
each week. The only provision for per- 
formers is that they must be new to 
network radio, although they may have 
had any amount of experience in other 
fields of show business. The show will 
run for thirteen weeks through the 
summer and, on the fourteenth broad- 
cast, the winners will be brought to 
New York City to compete in the grand 
finals. NBC has set up quite a project 
in New Talent, U.S.A., with teams of 
talent scouts and personnel who are on 
the road in advance of each broadcast 
to assist the local stations in preliminary 
arrangements and in the local talent 
contests from which the performers are 
chosen. The network has high hopes 
of discovering many new personalities 
for both radio and television. 

Suspense is off CBS Radio for the 
summer and in its place on Monday 
nights you can hear a half-hour pro- 
gram called Crime Classics. Strictly on 
the dramatic side, with re-enactments 
of actual famous crimes in history. El- 
liott Lewis, who knows his drama, is 
producing and directing. 

Eddy Arnold takes over for Dinah 
Shore on NBC -TV while Dinah grabs 
a bit of vacation. Incidentally, the 
"Tennessee Plowboy," as Eddy is 
known, was {Continued, on page 6) 



Fred Allen and Tonn Dugan learn sonne facts about how blood can 
u save children from polio at Red Cross show in Beverly Hills. 

M 



to Coast 





Jimmy Durante surrounded by o bevy of beauties at La Guardia Airport. 



Eddy Arnold, the Tennessee Plowboy, 
just signed a contract with NBC. 




Bespectacled NBC-TV scene designer, William C. Molyneux, who does sets for Voice Of Firestone 
ond NBC-TV Opera, explains tricks of his trade to students at New York School of Performing Arts. 



L 




New Mum vnth M-3 

Idlls odor bacteiia 

stops odor all day long 



PROOF! 

New Mum with M-3 destroys bac- 
teria that cause perspiration odor. 



Photo (left), showi active odor bac- 
teria. Photo (right), after adding new 
Mum, shows bacteria destroyed ! 
Mum contains M-3, a scientific dis- 
covery that actually destroys odor 
bacteria . . . doesn't give underarm 
odor a chance to start. 



Amazingly effective protection from under- 
arm perspiration odor — just use new Mum 
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clothes. Gentle Mum is certified by the Amer- 
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No waste, no drying out. The only leading 
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Mum is usable, wonderful right to the bottom of 
the jar. Get a jar today and stay nice to be near! 

A Product of Bristol-Myers 



recently signed by NBC to a five-year radio 
and television contract, and he'll probably 
star on a show of his own in the fall. 
Under the terms of his new pact, he'll 
continue to do his radio program on Sat- 
urday nights. 

If you like yotrr summer radio fare, cul- 
tural style, listen to Literary Greats on 
ABC on Tuesday nights. This is a series 
of recordings by famous names of the arts, 
reading or talking about their work. Fea- 
tured are such well-known creative per- 
sonalities as Laurence Olivier, Tennessee 
Williams, William Faulkner, Sean O'Casey 
and The Sitwells. 

21st Precinct is the name of a new 
dramatic radio series on CBS which fills 
the My Friend Irma spot on Tuesday 
nights. This half-hour will be produced in 
cooperation with the New York City 
Policemen's Benevolent Association and 
will present adaptations from true crim- 
inal records in New York, slanted from 
the policeman's point of view. 

Long-time listeners to the NBC Sym- 
phony Orchestra broadcasts will be happy 
to know even at this early date, that 
Arturo Toscanini will conduct again dur- 
ing the 1953-54 season, starting November 
7. This will be the sixteenth complete sea- 
son for the eighty-six-year-old maestro. 

CBS Radio has three interesting shows 
penciled in for summer. The first is Coun- 
try Editor, a dramatic half-hour about a 
small -town newspaper, starring Will 
Rogers, Jr. Rogers should certainly be able 
to play his role convincingly, because until 
recently he published his own newspaper 
in his home town of Beverly Hills, 
California. 

The second program, called Stage Struck, 
is an hour show saluting the living thea- 
tre, with scenes from his Broadway plays, 
news of theatre personalities and guest in- 
terviews. Mike Wallace, of Mike And Buff, 
emcees this one 

And the third summer show is Between 
Teens, a thirty-minute panel quiz for teen- 
agers, with Red Barber, CBS Counselor on 
Sports, as the moderator. 

This 'n' That: 

Fred Allen will finally make his long- 
awaited television debut on Tuesday night, 
August 18, when Judge For Yourself bows 
on NBC. TThe program, which is a comedy- 
interview talent show, will be simulcast. 
Herb Shriner, who will share his cigarette 
sponsor with Allen, is moving over to 
CBS on August 15 and will probably be 
assigned the Saturday-night time spot 
following Jackie Gleason. 

What's with the Jack Webbs? The rumor 
bird whispers from Hollywood that the 
Dragnet star and his actress wife, Julie 
London, are having marital troubles. He 
recently flew into N.Y. for a quick trip, 
registered at a hotel under an assumed 
name and, after a few days, hopped back 
to Hollywood. 

Warren Hull is certainly the favorite 
son of his home town, Gasport, New York 
They gave him a rousing homecoming 
celebration a few weeks ago, complete 
with parade and everything. 

Dorothy "Dottie" Schwartz, former mem- 
ber of the Chordettes vocal group, and her 
husband. Bill Schwartz, have welcomed a 
baby boy. And Dorothy has said she is 
through with singing for a while and will 
concentrate on a domestic career in She- 
boygan, Wisconsin. 

Also on the receiving list from the stork 
was Big Jon Arthur of the Big Jon And 
Sparkle and No School Today programs 
over ABC. Arthur and his wife named the 
latest addition to their family Debbora 
Ruth. They have three other little Arthurs. 
Kathy, Mary Melody and Lloyd. 
{Continued on "pacie 20) 




Bobbi is perfect for this casual "Inge- 
nue" hair style, for Bobbi is the perma- 
nent designed to give soft, natural- 
looking curls. Easy. No help needed. 




Only Bobbi is designed to give the nat- 
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casual charm of this "Cotillion." And 
you get your wave where you want it. 




What a casual, easy livin' look this 
"Minx" hairdo has . . . thanks to Bobbi! 
Bobbi Pin-Curl Permanents always 
give you soft, carefree curls like these. 




Bobbi's soft curls make a casual wave like this possible. Notice the easy, 
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NO TIGHT, FUSSY CURLS ON THIS PAGE! 

These hairdos were made with Bobbi 
... the special home permanent 
for casual hair styles 



Yes, Bobbi Pin-Curl Permanent is 
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you use Bobbi your hair has the 
beauty, the body, the soft, lovely 
look of naturally wavy hair. And 
your hair stays that way — your 
wave lasts week after week. 



Bobbi's so easy to use, too. You 
just put your hair in pin curls. 
Then apply Bobbi Creme Oil Lo- 
tion. Rinse hair with water, let 
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clumsy curlers to use. No help 
needed even for beginners. 

Ask for Bobbi Pin- Curl Perma- 
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— if you can make /•gj!J5'^^^^^i«»s^ 

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The Vans: Lyie, Jr., 10, Lyia Gaye, 12, Dirk, 5, and Lyvonne gaze at photo olbums. 



;- 



s 




GOOD NIGHT LITTLE REDHEADS ^ 




swings at bat with 



Vans — Dirk 



LyIe gets 
LyIe, Jr., 



n a few practice 
and LyIa Goye. 



THOUSANDS of letters from listeners have 
asked the same question of Lyle Van, 
WOR newscaster — "Who are the little 
redheads you say good night to at the end 
of each of your programs?" Well, the above 
pictures reveal at least three reasons why 
Lyle says this — his own three little red- 
heads at home. But Lyle isn't at all partial 
— his good night is intended for all red- 
headed children, wherever they may be. 



wherever you are 



The witty newsman who brings News 
On The Human Side into New York 
homes, five days a week over WOR, is 
a member of a family that dates its 
American arrival at 1652. His real name 
is Van Valkenburgh, and his Dutch 
ancestors settled in upper New York 
State when New York was still New 
Amsterdam. 

How radio ever came into his life is 
still somewhat vague to Lyle, who had 
no intentions along that line originally. 
He sang in the choir at school in Troy, 
New York, when he was a boy (so- 
prano), and had pretty definitely de- 
cided to be a singer by the time he 
was twenty. But, when Lyle was 
twenty, singers — like other people — 
wei'e lucky if they could eat, much less 
sing for a living, so Lyle got interested 
in Florida, where they were supposed 
to be having a boom. Well, Lyle got 
there in time for the bust — so, to keep 
body and soul together, he became a 
U. S. Marshal, whose job it was to run 
down rum-runners off Key West. 

But finally Lyle found radio — acci- 
dentally. He was selling insurance to 
a man who owned a radio station down 
South. The man didn't buy any insur- 
ance, but he hired Lyle as a radio 
announcer. Now, several radio stations, 
one marriage and three children later, 
Lyle is one of the most popular news- 
men on the air. His little redheads are 
pretty famous, too. Ethel Keller and 
Thayer Walthall have written a song 
entitled "Good Night, Little Redhead," 
dedicated to Lyle's carrot-tops, wher- 
ever they are. 



*|l 



Why Dial Soap protects 
jour complexion 

even under make-up 

Dial clears your complexion by removing 
blemish-spreading bacteria 

that other soaps leave on your skin 



No matter how lax-ishly or how sparingly you normally use 
cosmetics, when you wash beforehand with Dial soap, 
the fresh clearness of your skin is continuously protected 
underneath your make-up. 

For tliis mild, gentle face soap does a wonderful thing. It 
washes away trouble-causing bacteria that other soaps (even 
the finest) leave on your skin. Dial does this because it con- 
tains AT-7 (Hexachlorophene). It clears the skin of unseen 
bacteria that so often aggravate and spread surface blemishes. 

Works in a new way! 

Until Dial came along, there was no way of removing these 
bacteria safely and effectively. These pictures, taken through 
a microscope, are proof. No. 1 shows thousands of bacteria 
left on the skin after washing mth ordinary soap. (So when 
you put on make-up, they are free to cause trouble under- 
neath.) No. 2 shows how daily wash- 
ing with Dial removes up to 95% of 
these blemish-spreading bacteria. 

And Dial is so mild! 

When you first try this beauty-refreshing soap, you'd never 
guess it could give you such benefits. It's delicately scented. 
Dial's mild, cjeamy lather removes dirt and make-up so gently 
and completely it helps overcome clogged pores and blackheads. 
Skin doctors recommend Dial for adolescent complexions. 
And with Dial your skin wiU become cleaner and clearer than 
any other type of soap can get it. Why not let mild, fragrant 
Dial soap protect your complexion — even under make-up? 




Also available in Canada 




^ P. S For cleaner, more beautiful hair, try New dial shampoo 
in the handy, unbreakable squeeze bottle. 

DIAL DAVE GARROW AY- NBC, Weekdays 




who's who on the 
American Music Hall 




Burgess Meredith 



THE HOST on ABC's American Music Hall 
is that nonchalant gentleman of the theatre 
and screen — Burgess Meredith. Ever since 
he started taking acting seriously, Burgess 
Meredith has been very successful. Born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, Burgess spent his early twen- 
ties going from one job to another. He couldn't 
find any job that really made him happy. In 
1930, with his enrollment in Eva Le Gallienne's 
Student Repertory Group, Burgess changed. 
He discovered acting was an exciting way of 
making a better than average living. He began 
to attract critical attention in 1933 when he 
appeared with Le Gallienne in "Alice In Won- 
derland." In 1936, he reached the heights of 
the acting profession when Maxwell Anderson 
wrote "Winterset" for him. In it, Meredith 
achieved lasting fame on the stage and, later, 
in the film version. In the past few years, he 
has added producing, directing and writing to 
his theatrical work. In private life, Meredith 
is relaxed and uninhibited. He's an ardent 
antique collector — even owned a shop at one 
time. He likes sport clothes and usually needs 
a haircut. Friends he's made on the Music Hall 
will want to hear him as The Adventurer — 
also on ABC. 



The American Music Hall is heard on ABC Radio every 
Sunday, 7 to 9 P.M. EDT, produced by Paul Whiteman. 



I 



10 




Nancy Kenyan 



LOVELY songstress Nancy Kenyon provides 
. some of the glamour and sweet vocalizing 
on the American Music Hall. She brings 
to the Music Hall an extensive background in- 
cluding musical comedy and TV experience. 
She's a native of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and 
her father and mother were both performing 
artists. Nancy's mother, Minnie Cameron, was 
a violinist and her father, Ralph Barker, a 
pianist. At thirteen, Nancy was commuting 
to New York weekends to study voice. At 
eighteen. The Philadelphia Opera Company 
offered her a place in their cast, but Nancy re- 
fused in order to accept an offer from the 
brothers Shubert to appear in "The Merry 
Widow" on Broadway. Nancy got very good 
notices on her part in that production, and 
went on to score successes in the revival of 
Jerome Kern's "Show Boat," "The Red Mill," 
and "Song of Norway," all notable New York 
hits. She made her TV debut singing the 
musical clues on Bert Parks's Break The Bank. 
She also got rave notices when she replaced 
Marguerite Piazza on Your Show Of Shows, 
while Miss Piazza was on vacation. Nancy is 
still looking for the right young man to make 
her life complete. She lives in a cute two- 
room apartment in Manhattan, owns a pet 
spaniel — "Maggie" — and uses spare moments 
knitting, cooking, or making miniature rail- 
road models. 



FEW SINGERS have been as fortunate as Larry 
Douglas, the male vocalist on the Music 
Hall, who has been working steadily ever 
since he got his first role in Billy Rose's 
"Jumbo." The handsome baritone, with his 
fine resonant voice, is always in demand for 
roles in stage productions, for radio and club 
dates. He has been featured in such hit shows 
as "Panama Hattie," "Where's Charlie?" and, 
more currently, "The King And I." A Brook- 
lyn boy, Larry attended Erasmus Hall High 
School, where he was a member of the glee 
club. For pin money he worked as a butcher 
boy in a meat market, where his only audience 
were some unappreciative sides of beef. Larry 
entered every amateur contest he could, until 
he got tired of winning loving cups and de- 
cided to turn professional. He crashed the 
office of Billy Rose, diminutive Broadway 
impresario, who was casting a gigantic produc- 
tion called "Jumbo." Larry made good, and 
stayed with the show until 1935. It was while 
Larry was singing in the production of "Hold 
It" that he met the girl he'd dreamed of for a 
wife. She was a dancer, but wanted to trade a 
career for a family. They have one little girl, 
born in 1951. In among club dates, radio pro- 
grams and musical comedy, Larry records for 
two major disc companies. The rest of the time 
is wrapped up in the ever-delightful activities, 
of his little daughter. 




L 



Larry Douglas 



R 

m 
11 



WWDC's night owl Jack Rowzie keeps watch over Washington from midnight to dawn. 




NIGHT BEAT with ROWZIE 



12 



JACK Rowzie's wife used to complain to him, "Why 
can't you get off night-beat duty?" But, as a member 
of the Washington, D. C, pohce force, Jack had to 
take the job he was assigned. Well, one day Jack decided 
to resign from the force, and Mrs. Rowzie felt like a 
million dollars — now she could expect him home for 
dinner when the rest of Washington husbands came 
home. Destiny is something she didn't figure on — and it 
seems to be Jack's destiny to work all night. He now 
runs an all-night disc jockey show over WWDC. 

It was while Jack was still on the force that radio 
entered his life. His first job was as a newscaster; later 
he became a deejay and sports commentator. Finally 
the radio career won out. Rowzie's an oddity in 
Washington radio, since he's one of the few native 
Washingtonians on the airwaves. He grew up in the 
capital, where he went to school, played sand-lot baseball, 
sold newspapers, and was a Western Union messenger. 
By the time he joined the police force in 1941, Jack 
was known and liked by a lot of people in town. 

The king of the airwaves after midnight. Jack has 
absolutely no competition for listeners' attention. The 
only other sounds heard above his program are the meows 
of cats on back fences throughout the town. The cats 
taught Jack a lesson. Nobody throws tin cans at him, 
because he keeps his music and his voice soft. His 
most faithful listeners are cab drivers and his former 
buddies on the force, who catch him on their patrol 
car radios. They give Jack lots of exclusive tips, too, 
when something newsy happens in the middle of the night. 

True, Jack's schedule seems slightly off beat, but 
when you get right down to it, he really likes to be up 
all night — "It's the most exciting time of the day," he says. 




The Rowzie children- 
six, do some brutal 



-Donna, thirteen, and Jon, 
"waking Daddy" routines. 



^low...for the Jrirst time, a Home Permanent brings you 



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A new method makes neutralizing much 

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A wonderful leave conditioner beautifies 

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Beauty experts say you can actually jeel 

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Yes, you can feel the extra softness, in hair 
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R 
M 

13 




WIP's zany deejays Jerry Williams and Harry Smith provide music and laughter. 




OME PEOPLE 

CALL IT 

MADNESS 



H 



R 
M 

14 



ARRY Smith and Jerry Williams 
are WIP's answer to the A-bomb. 
The only difference is that the 
two Philadelphia deejays split gags 
instead of atoms. The result is 
almost as explosive. Williams and 
Smith began their comedy disc- 
jockey team in the fall of 1950. This 
year they were signed on the 
three to four p.m. spot over WIP. 
They also do the Saturday-afternoon 
record show, Record Room. A 
month-long search was conducted 
to find a suitable name for the 
team — and the winning selection 
was Gagbusters. 

The tall, lanRy half of the team — 
Harry Smith — grew up in Camden, 
New Jersey. He attended Woodrow 
Wilson High School, where he 
tried out for the football, baseball 
and basketball teams — none of 
which poor Harry made. After all 
these failures, claims Harry, "radio 
was the only thing left." Once he 
had gotten his radio job, the Army 
discovered him, and promptly j 
gave him a job. He saw service in m 
Manila and New Guinea. After 
he was discharged, Harry took a 
screen test and flunked that — his 
head just wouldn't flatten out. 
But then he met Jerry, and the 
world became brighter for both 
of them. 

Jerry Williams has been stage- 
struck ever since he was a child 
in Brooklyn, New York. Just as 
he'd gotten his start in radio, the 
Army Air Force summoned him 
and he spent the next few years 
flying over China, Burma and 
India. After the war he worked in 
radio before heading for New 
York. In Manhattan he acted in 
many TV shows, such as Studio mt 
One, Martin Kane, and Philco ™ 

Playhouse. But fate finally brought 
him into contact with Harry — and 
it's been a partnership ever since. 
"Some people call it madness," 
croons Jerry, "but we call it money." 



IJ 




Hidden "fint/er" gtanvls are molded in to flatten your 
tummy, smooth and support your figure in Nature's own 
way. Boneless non-roll top taper? and belittles your waist- 
line, stays up without a stay. See the lovely textured latex 
outside . . . feel the cloud-soft fabric inside. 



j\faA/Pla;^tex Magic-Controller fte. Byu^/ 



Boneless non-roll top and hidden "finger" panels make 
a difference you can measure — no matter what your size/ 



Here it is ... a brief that really slims 
you ... a brief with all the natural, 
figure-molding virtues of the Magic- 
Controller Girdle ... a brief that 
gives you the figure and the freedom 
for summer's revealing clothes. 

It hasn't a single seam, stitch, stay 
or bone— hidden "finger" panels firm 
and flatten you. tone and support 
you naturallv from waist to thigh. 



Magic-Controller Panty Brief is all 
latex, fabric lined, one piece and 
wonderful. It's invisible under your 
sleekest slacks, washes in seconds, 
and you can almost watch it dry.' 

If you've ever worn a brief, you'll 
see the difference. If you think you 
can't wear slacks or revealing play- 
clothes ... let Magic -Controller 
Brief show you how, now! 




@1953 International Latex Corp'n . . . PIAYTEX PARK . . . Dover Del. Playtex Ltd., Montreal, Canada 



I Playtex Magic-Controller 
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playtex Fabric Lined panty brief with 
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Playtex . . . known everywhere as the 
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R 

M 

15 



when hair loses that 

J look 



(« « 



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See for yourself how this condi- 
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Daytime 



T/ie Foremost Name 
In Hair Beauty 



AUXT JENXY Littleton is an average 
small American town, full of stories of 
average people that you might miss if you 
didn't know what to look for. But every- 
thing ahout Littleton is known to Aunt 
Jenny. All the dramatic elements of love 
and hate, greed, hope and jealousy that 
make the seemingly quiet lives of her 
neighbors so truly dramatic emerge in her 
exciting stories of her town and the peo- 
ple in it. M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BACKSTAGE WIFE Mary Noble, pain- 
fully aware of spoiled Elise Shephard's 
love for her actor-husband Larry, tries to 
distract her thoughts by becoming inter- 
ested in the mysterious Lucius Brooks. But 
Brooks may turn out to be more mysteri- 
ous and more dangerous than Mary sus- 
pects. Was this what actress Dolores 
Martinez had in mind when she introduced 
this old friend of hers to Mary Noble? 
M-F, 4 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

BitiGUTER nAY Reverend Richard 
Dennis has spent his life doing right and 
fighting in his peaceable way to see it 
done by others. He comes more or less 
naturally to the defense of young Alan 
Butler, unable to believe the young man 
guilty of the murder of Elmer Davidson. 
But Dr. Dennis has a deeper reason for 
concern in the case, because his daughter 
Patsy has fallen jn love with Alan. Is 
Patsy's happiness doomed? M-F, 2:45 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 

DOCTOWS WIFE Julie and her hus- 
band. Dr. Dan Palmer, have an unex- 
pected first-hand experience with a young 
ex-convict's struggle for rehabilitation 
when they hire Richard Johnson, son of 
one of the hospital's elevator operators, as 
handyman during Julie's pregnancy. Is 
their faith in the young man misplaced? 
Has the gossiping town the right idea 
about the strange events which seem to 
center around him? M-F, 5:45 P.M. EDT, 
NBC. 

FROST PAGE FARRELL David Far- 
rell. ace crime reporter for the Daily Eagle, 
continues to collect glory with his unique 
combination of reportorial skill and de- 
tective instinct. Always on the scene when 
a big crime story breaks, David invariably 
manages to pick up the criminal's trail be- 
fore it has grown too cold. And, no matter 
how dangerous the assignment, David's 
wife Sally is always at his side. M-F, 5:15 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

GViniXG EIGHT Just how much 
trouble can an unfriendly mother-in-law 
really cause if a marriage is on a funda- 
mentally steady basis? Kathy Grant may 
never know the answer, for her marriage 
to Dick got off to such a shaky start that 
Dick's suspicious mother had only to raise 
an eyebrow, ask a question. Will Meta, 



still uncertain in her position as Kathy's 
stepmother, be able to help enough to 
strengthen Kathy? M-F, 1:45 P.M. EDT, 
CBS. M-F, 12:45 P.M. EDT, CBS-TV. 

HILLTOP HOUSE Julie Paterno, su- 
pervisor of the orphanage Hilltop House, 
appears to have resolved one of her life's 
most important problems as she plan- 
marriage to Reed Nixon. But the strange 
woman named Annabelle, who almost 
wrecked Reed's life a while ago, turns up 
again with a disturbing question: will 
Reed adopt the infant born of her mar- 
riage to his cousin, the child she doesn't 
want? How will this affect Julie's future? 
M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

JVST PLAIX BILL Bill Davidson has 
no trouble recognizing that Teresa Knight 
is a dangerous woman. But Bill's daughter 
Nancy, careless of her father's warning, 
almost allows Teresa to ruin her marriage. 
The happiness of at least four other peo- 
ple falls prey to this woman's twisted 
desire for power over others. Can Bill find 
a way to stop her before she succeeds in 
creating some final, dreadful tragedy? 
M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

LIFE CAX BE BEAVTIFVL Douglas 
Norman's new assistant on his little news- 
paper, the East Side News, bothers Chichi 
from the beginning, and she is caught be- 
tween pity and anger as the truth about 
the girl, Grace Garcine, finally emerges. 
Chichi is relieved, however, to realize that 
all along Doug was not quite so blind to 
Grace's strange activities as he appeared. 
Will he be able lo prevent the damage thev 
may have done? M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

LORENZO JOXES During the months 
of Belle's search for Lorenzo, she never 
dreamed that finding him might not be 
synonymous with complete happiness. But 
now that she has found him she faces her 
worst trial as Lorenzo, about to marry Gail 
Maddox, cannot recognize Belle as his 
wife. If he does not regain his memory, 
what tragedy lies ahead for Belle? Is she 
wise to continue working for producer 
Verne Massey? M-F, 5:30 P.M. EDT. 
NBC. 

MA PERKINS From the moment Tom 
Wells reappeared in her life Fay has been 
a bit less jubilant, a shade less confident, 
than a girl in love ought to be. Are Fay's 
unspoken doubts justified? Will Ma be 
called on for help that even she cannot 
give as Tom's book approaches publica- 
tion? And what about Ma's daughter 
Evey, whose unexpected new baby causes 
some important changes in the Fitz house- 
hold? M-F, 1:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

OUR GAL SUNDAY With Paul Tay- 
lor's death, the misunderstanding between 
Sunday and her husband. Lord Henry, is 



Diar y 



fanned to a crisis by Paul's widow, Wilma. 
Sunday is also seriously endangered by 
the maniacal Clifford Gates. Wilma's 
brother, who has enlisted Rose Taylor's 
help in his deadly scheme for revenge 
against the Brinthropes. Can Sunday help 
Henry clear himself of suspicion in con- 
nection with Paul Tavlor's death? M-F. 
12:45 P.M. EDT. CBS.' 

PEPPER YOLXG'S FA3iILY De- 
spite the nearly fatal results of Jim Den- 
nis' effort to get back the baby he was 
once willing to have his wife give out for 
adoption, he is increasingly determined to 
prevent Pepper and Linda from consoli- 
dating their legal right to the child. Will 
Dennis' grim scheme to reclaim the child 
have results more tragic than he can fore- 
see? How will Pepper and Linda weather 
this onslaught against their happiness? 
M-F. 3:30 P.M. EDT. CBS. 

PERRY MASO\ Each time lawyer 
Perry Mason advances a step toward his 
final expose of racket king Mark Cesar. 
Cesar manages to make a clever retreat 
that keeps him just enough ahead of Perry 
and the police for safety. But. one by one, 
Cesar's henchmen are being dragged into 
the open. Will Emmett's death and the 
activities of Mrs. McCormick somehow 
enable Perry to get to Cesar in time to 
save his client. Ruth Davis? M-F. 2:L'i 
P.M. EDT. CBS. 

RiGHT TO HAPPi^'ESS Carolyn 
Kramer Nelson finds that her own future 
and the future of her marriage are bound 
up in the fate of two young people who 
a short time ago were strangers to her. Her 
passion for justice keeps her fighting for 
Danny Lockwood's freedom even though 
she now knows that if she does not give 
it up the gap between her and her hus- 
band. Governor Miles Nelson, may become 
a permanent break. M-F, 3:45 P.M. EDT. 
NBC. 

ROAD OF LIFE There were times dur- 
ing their courtship when Dr. Jim Brent 
and Jocelyn McLeod thought that they 
would never be able to realize their love. 
But last June Jim and Jocelyn were mar- 
ried, and all their friends rejoiced for 
them. But is it possible that even now a 
shadow lies over Dr. Jim and his bride? 
How will Jocelyn be able to overcome the 
resentment of Janie. Jim's daughter by his 
first wife Carol, who died five years ago? 
Will Janie ever really accept Jocelyn? And 
what effect will Janie's problem have on 
Jim? M-F. 1 P.M. EDT. CBS. M-F, 3:15 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT 

Helen's recent visit to the mountaintop 

home of her employer, producer Kelsey 

i Spenser, results in repercussions even more 



J^SkinBumesOn 
Cashmere Bouquet Soap 

. . because its such wholesome skin-carer 




Says Baouty Dm^r 



JONES 



CANDY •'"77' ^^Y,ric "Doily Cashmere Bouquet Cofa 

Conover School m New \\^\^J-rUt>co ni^c ■»« Hpu, OntPPts." 



Head of the Famous 

"As a beauty director," says Miss Jones, "I 
always recommend Cashmere Bouquet Soap, 
because I consider it the most effective com- 
plexion-care. It's wholesome for the skin, and 
it leaves a look of natural beauty — the kind 
that no amount of make-up alone can achieve." 

Do as beauty expert Candy Jones advises. 
Use fragrant Cashmere Bouquet Soap regu- 
larly. Its rich lather is so mild and gentle, 
leaves your skin with such a naturally fresh, 
radiant look . . . you'll be saying, "my skin 
thrives on Cashmere Bouquet Soap!" 







Helped These &\Hq to New Coreefs" 

SAVS CAMDY 



PAULA STEWART 
Television Actress 





tLLEN WILLIAMS 
College Setretary 



Here Are Candy Jones' 
Personal Beauty Tips For You! 

/ Stained or discolored hands clear 
beautifully if you'll pour 2 tea- 
spoons of fresh lemon juice into your 
palm, half-filled with Cashmere Bou- 
quet Hand Lotion. Massage well, re- 
peat every other night for 2 weeks. 

^, Complement your daily beauty 
care with eight hours' sleep . . . and 
start each new day with a thorough 
beauty-cleansing with Cashmere 
Bouquet Soap! 

More later, CHW^ 



17 




a day with 



Two big moments in a busy day: Robert Q. Lewis introduces 
Helen on the Arthur Godfrey Time broadcast — and takes her 
to lunch at Louis and Armand's famed restaurant near CBS, 




WHEN Helen Haaland saw that exciting 
contest in Radio-TV Mirror, she thought 
how lucky some girl would be — 
winning the chance to be Robert Q. Lewis' 
secretary for a day! But she never dreamed 
she'd be that girl. Busy now as housewife 
(husband Einar is a machinist) and mother 
(four little girls), Helen had finally had to 
give up her secretarial job with Mutual Life 
Insurance. However, she kept up her 
shorthand and typing with part-time work 
for her mother, Mrs. Birdie Mohaupt, who 
writes children's stories and gardening articles. 
Unknown to her, Mrs. Mohaupt entered 
Helen in the contest — and her praise of her 
"perfect secretary" was so sincere and to the 
point that Helen was chosen the winner! 
Result: A memorable day behind the scenes 
of big-time broadcasting, and a score of 
pictures with celebrities who had once been 
only names to the young housewife-secretary 
from Woodbury, Connecticut. 

^^ 

Hear Lewis on CBS Radio in Robert Q.'s Waxworks, 
Sun., 10 P.M., for Webcor— and the Robert Q. Lewis 
Little Show, M-F, 4 P.M., for General Foods. See him 
on ABC-TV in The Name's The Same, Tues., 10:30 P.M., 
for Swanson's Foods, Johnson's Wax. (All times EDT.) 



Office hours: Helen leorns something of what it's like to be 
secretory to a radio-TV star. She helps with the records as 
Robert Q. tapes comments for his popular deejay programs. 




Correspondence: Lewis goes over fan mail, as his regular 
secretary, Nancy Robinson (at left), brings in trayful after 
trayful. (Helen also typed scripts, took some dictation.) 



R 

M 

18 




Robert Q. 




Lu Ann SImms and Julius La Rosa 
escort Helen around the CBS studios. 




Helen meets every little Godfrey — 
including glamorous Morion Marlowe. 




The Mariners are on deck, too — for 
another photo in her memory book. 



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R 

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R 
M 

20 




WHAT'S NEW FROM COAST TO COAST 



(Continued from page 6) 



Teresa Brewer, the cute little singer who 
is subbing for Jane Froman on Summer- 
time, U.S.A., must have decided against 
those movie offers which were tossed her 
way after her Hollywood night-club ap- 
pearance. She has been spending every 
free moment between rehearsals looking 
for a home to buy in the Westchester sec- 
tion of New York. Teresa constantly gets 
fan letters from young men who simply 
refuse to believe she is very much married 
and the mother of two children. 

"I Believe," the hit song which has been 
at the top of the list for so long, is the first 
tune ever introduced on a television pro- 
gram which became popular as a result. 
Jane Froman's writers composed the song 
for her to do on her program last Decem- 
ber 13, and it received such response from 
the public that it was immediately pub- 
lished and recorded and, of course, became 
her theme song. "I Believe" recently won 
a Christopher Award for its authors. 
Christophers are given annually for "crea- 
tive works that reflect the power for good 
that can be exerted." 

Faye Emerson and her old Cola sponsor 
may be in business together again soon. 
There's a dramatic filmed series in the 
offing for ABC-TV which would find Faye 
giving out with the commercials. 

I Love Lucy has accomplished a lot of 
things and topped a lot of ratings, but 
now it can also be called an alibi! A young 
man was arrested in Compton, California, a 
few weeks ago, on suspicion of an armed 
robbery which took place about 9:15 P.M. 
on a Monday night. The suspect insisted 
he couldn't possibly have been at the scene 
of the crime because he never missed 
Lucy, which goes on at 9:00 P.M. in the 
Los Angeles area. Witnesses corroborated 
his faithful viewing and proved that on 
the night of the trouble he had been enter- 
taining a crowd at his home watching the 
program. P.S. He was released! 

Liltin' Martha Tilton and her new hus- 
band, test pilot James Brooks, are plan- 
ning a delayed honeymoon late in August, 
when they'll visit his relatives in Roanoke, 
Virginia. 

Eve Arden reports that her Our Miss 
Brooks show has made a strong impres- 
sion on her yoving daughter, Connie. It 
seems that Connie recently finished up her 
going-to-bed prayers with "God bless 
Mommie and Our Miss Brooks. We're a 
little late. Lord, so good night." 

Mulling the Mail: 

Mrs. F.H.D., Paterson, New Jersey: No, 
Marion Marlowe does not wear a hearing 
aid. I think this odd rumor got started 
because of the way Marion has worn her 
hair on occasion, sort of fluffed over her 
ears. . . . T.B.C., Toledo, Ohio: Yes, Red 
Buttons will be off television during the 
summer months, but will not be making a 
movie. However, there are negotiations un- 
der way for him to make a few night-club 
appearances, and the first one may be in 
Las Vegas. Red will be back at his regular 
CBS stand in the fall. . . . Miss J.B., Jack- 
sonville, Florida: Jimmy Durante is re- 
ported to have told close chums that he 
had signed a lifetime contract with NBC, 
but I don't think the network has an- 
nounced it officially as yet. . . . Mrs. A.B., 
Auburn, Washington: Sorry you've missed 
Mary Margaret McBride. She broadcasts 



daily from New York, and just recently 
celebrated her nineteenth year on the air 
. . To all of you from everywhere who 
wrote asking about the Chordettes and the 
Mariners, from the Arthur Godfrey shows: 
The Chordettes and Godfrey parted com- 
pany on the friendliest of terms. When 
Dottie Schwartz left the group, the girls 
got a new "voice" to replace her and at 
the moment they are in the process of 
musically re-voicing and re-organizing 
their quartette. Since leaving Arthur's 
shows, they have worked in and around 
New York City, "trying out" the group, as 
it were, on personal appearances. The 
girls, who have a tremendous fan follow- 
ing, will probably be set for a radio or 
television show this fall. Now, about The 
Mariners: The boys didn't make the Florida 
trip with the Godfrey gang because they 
had concert work and personal appearances 
to do, for which they were committed 
before the date for the Florida trek was 
set. And Arthur had given his okay for 
their two-week vacation a couple of 
months previously. 

What Ever Happened To . . .? 

Johnny Dugan, the tenor, who gained 
much popularity on his own NBC-TV show 
last year? Johnny hasn't been too active 
in television until about three weeks ago, 
when NBC signed him to a contract and 
promptly handed him the emcee chores on 
a new afternoon variety show. Ladies 
Choice, which is seen' Monday through 
Friday from Hollywood. 

Walter O'Keefe, formerly heard on 
Double Or Nothing? Lots of inquiries on 
Walter, who has been very quiet this past 
season. But his fans will be pleased to 
learn that he has a summer radio show on 
CBS called Get On The Ball. It's an audi- 
ence-participation program, heard Monday 
through Friday in the afternoons. 

Hal Block, who used to be a regular 
panel member on What's My Line? Hal 
left the show to go to Florida, where he 
did a disc-jockey broadcast for a while. 
At the moment, he isn't appearing on any 
regular radio or television show, though 
he may be set for something this fall. He 
will not return to What's My Line? 

Andy Russell, the baritone, who has sung 
on many radio shows? Andy has been 
more or less taking it easy lately at his 
home in Hollywood, except for recordings 
and occasional guest shots, though he did 
come to New York a couple of months ago 
to be a guest-star host on Show Of Shows, 
so maybe the television bug wiU bite him 
after all. ' 

These are some of the personalities read- 
ers have inquired about. If you have won- 
dered what happened to one of your ; 
favorite people on radio or television, drop 
me a line — Miss JiU Warren, Radio-TV 
Mirror Magazine, 205 East 42nd Street, 
New York City 17, New York, and I'll try 
my best to find out for you and put the 
information in the column. Unfortunately, j 
we don't have space to answer all the ; 
questions, so I try to cover those personal- 
ities about whom we receive the most 
inquiries. Sorry, no personal answers. 

(Note: On all shows, both radio and 
television, be sure to check your local | 
papers for time, station and channel) 




Florian ZaBach 



WHEN Florian ZaBach, featured 
violinist on the Club Embassy 
show over NBC-TV, was twelve 
years old, he was considered a child 
prodigy of the violin and gave his 
first concert in his native Chicago's 
Auditorium Concert Hall. He con- 
tinued this "longhaired" start by 
guest-appearing at the Chicago 
World's Fair in 1935 and embarking 
on a tour of the European capitals. 

When he returned to the United 
States, and while playing as soloist 
with the orchestras of Roy Shields 
and Percy Faith, Florian began to 
wake up to something about him- 
self. He noticed that not only was 
he appealing to lovers of serious 
music, but to lots of people who 
didn't know Beethoven from boogie 
woogie. A two-year hitch in the 
Army confirmed Florian's estimate. 
When he was mustered out, the 
handsome blond violinist aban- 
doned his concert career, and de- 
cided to devote himself to enter- 
taining the millions rather than the 
thousands. He organized his own 
society orchestra, touring the na- 
tion's select hotels and night clubs. 

On the road, Florian discovered 
that, in addition to his skill as a 
virtuoso, he was getting plaudits for 
being a personality — a personality 
who could sing, tell funny stories, 
and even do magic tricks. When the 
full impact of this dawmed on 
Florian. he immediately set about 
launching himself as a solo act. His 
success is something of a phe- 
nomenon when you consider that a 
solo violin act hadn't made money 
since Rubinoff and His Magic Violin. 

The factor which really carried 
Florian over the top into the magic 
circle of stars was a little record 
called "The Hot Canary," which sold 
upwards of a million copies. 

His success is used as an example 
by thousands of mothers throughout 
the land, who tell their Johnnys or 
Billys that if they practice their 
violin they may end up on TV like 
Florian ZaBach. 



Florian ZaBach appears on the Club 
Embassy, each Tuesday at 10:30 P.M. 
EDT, NBC-TV, for Embassy Cigarettes. 




Are you 

in the 

know? 




To start school with a bang — 

n Be o hide-beater Q Gang up Q Try soloing 
Don't let those hermit blues set in! Have 
you a special talent, hobby? Gang up with 
kindred souls who share it. Help with the 
school paper, or posters for the fall prom. 
Or, hop on the bandwagon (who knows — 
you might be a Rosemary, junior grade!); 
And don't let calendar cares nag you. With 
Kotex, you can beat off "outline" blues, for 
thosefiat pressed ends don^t show — so, your 
public will never know! 



Are these autographs likely to go — 

□ To her head □ Round her waist 

A walking album — your scrapbook belt (new 
fun fashion) ! Make-believe leather with vinyl 
plastic "window", it holds your heroes' auto- 
graphs, snapshots — whatever suits your fancy. 
And here's something for your memory book: 
at problem time, you can choose a Kotex 
absorbency that suits you — exactly. Try 
Regular, Junior, Super. 





More women choose KOTEX* 
than all other sanitary napkins 



What's on a smart job-holder's mind? 

Q The future O The c/ock O New material 
Your heart's set on a big-time career? 
Better keep your mind on the future in- 
stead of each visiting fireman. Show the 
boss you're dependable. Promotion-worthy. 
What's more, come "those days", don't 
count on heaven alone to protect the work- 
ing gal. Choose Kotex! That safety center 
gives extra protection — and you get lasting 
comfort, for this softer Kotex /loWsifisAope/ 



T. M. REG, 



, S, PAT. OFF. 




Which of these "steadies" does most for you? 

I I Romeo & Juliet Q Kofex and Kotex Belts Q Moon 'n' June 

Made for each other — that's Kotex and Kotex sanitary belts— and 
made to keep you comfortable. Of strong, soft-stretch elastic . . . 
they're designed to prevent curling, cutting, or twisting. So light- 
weight you'll hardly know you're wearing one. And Kotex belts 
take kindly to dunkings; stay flat even after countless washings. 
Why not buy two . . . for a change! 



R 
M 

21 



DO 

go near the water 




You can go swiinining wearing Tam- 
pax*. Even when the bathing suit's wet 
and dinging, internally-worn Tampax is 
the kind of monthly sanitary protection 
that doesn't reveal its presence. Doctor- 
invented Tampax is made of compressed, 
long-fibered cotton in throwaway appli- 
cators. It's so easy to insert that the 
user's hands need never even touch it. 
And it's just as easy to dispose of — a 
boon when you're away from home. 
You can sit on the beach wearing 
Tampax. What if you don't want to go 
in? "There's nothing to betray it's one of 
"those days"— no belts, no pins, no 
odor. In fact Tampax is so comfortable 
the wearer doesn't even feel it once it's 
in place. Worn by millions of women, 
Tampax is really a "must" to help you 
get every ounce of enjoyment out of 
Summer. 

Buy Tampax this month. At any 
drug or notion counter. In your choice 
of 3 absorbencies: Regular, Super, or 
Junior. Month's supply goes in purse; 
Tampax Incorporated, Palmer, Mass. 

"Ree. V. S. Pat. Off. 




22 



Accepted for Advertising 
by the Journal of the American Medical Association 



Information 



Sunday Afternoons 

Dear Editor: 

Can you please give me some informa- 
tion about the host of On A Sunday After- 
noon? We all think he has a very pleasant 
voice. 

E. B., Hanover, N. H. 

Eddie Gallaher, host of CBS Radio's 
On A Sunday Afternoon music series, is 
an extremely busy young man. He writes 
a weekly column on records in the Wash- 
ington Post, is a ranking low-handicap 
golfer, and does numerous radio chores in 
addition to his summer stint on CBS. Ever 
since he started broadcasting while still 
in college in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Eddie has 
delighted ever-growing audiences. Born in 
Washington, D. C, thirty-odd years ago, 
Eddie came back to his birthplace from 
Tulsa, where he grew up, to make a name 
for himself. He took over Godfrey's old 
programs in the capital, and proved to be 
equal to the difficult task of replacing the 
fabulous redhead. He lends his charm to 
the CBS summer series for the second year. 

Mary McGoon 

Dear Editor: 

Is Mary McGoon, the featured cooking 
expert on the Bob And Ray show, a man 
or a woman? 

C. N., New London, Conn. 

Mary McGoon, Bob and Ray's answer to 




Eddie Gallaher 



Poison Pete, is none other than Ray Gould- 
ing himself. 

Sheldon's a Producer 

Dear Editor: 

I often notice the name, Sheldon Leon- 
ard, listed as the producer of various TV 
shows, including a steady credit for Jewel- 
er's Showcase, a dramatic series. Is this 
the same Sheldon Leonard who used to be 
in the movies in gangster pictures? 

P. B. S., Athens, Ohio 

Yes, Leonard the actor and Leonard 
the producer are the same Sheldon. In 
addition to being a past master at the art 
of portraying the mugg with the heart of 
gold, who is always attired in pepper-and- 
salt tweeds, Sheldon is a very capable 
writer, director and producer of teleplays. 
A graduate of New York's Stuyvesant 
High School and Syracuse University, he 
began his career in college plays. His first 
movie job was in a film made in the West 
Indies. From there he turned to the Broad- 
way stage — playing featured roles in 
"Three Men on a Horse," "Kiss the Boys 
Goodbye," and "Having a Wonderful 
Time." In 1940, Sheldon went to Holly- 
wood where he made over one hundred 
pictures. In 1950, he sold his first TV 
script, and, since that time, Sheldon has 
really "moved in" on the production end 
of television. 




Booth 



Voice of Spring 

Dear Editor: 

Who is the girl who does the fashion 
commentary on Camel Caravan with John 
Cameron Suayze? I call her the "voice of 
spring." 

C. K., Fulton, III. 

Your girl is Connie Lembeck. She quit 
radio and TV after her marriage, but while 
her husband served as a colonel in the 
Army during the last war. Connie returned 
to her career. She appears on many dra- 
matic shows as well as on Camel Caravan. 

Five! 

Dear Editor: 

W ho is the man on the Walter Jf inchell 
TV broadcast that calls out how much 
time W inchell has left? 

M. B., New York City 

The man's name is Sonny Diskin on the 
production staff at ABC. 

Mr. Keen 

Dear Editor: 

You never print any pictures of Mr. 
Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons. Who is he, 
and what does he look like? 

S. H., Baker, Fla. 

Mr. Keen is portrayed by veteran actor 
Philip Clarke and. if you look down this 
column a bit, you'll see what Mr. Keen 
looks like. 

(Continued on page 25) 




Philip Clarke 



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R 
M 

23 



WKBW's Stan Barron sits in front of the studio under his trusty umbrella for the Clock Watcher Show. 




"WEATHER" or NOT 



R 
M 

24 



STAN Barron has a unique approach 
to radio broadcasting. He does his 
Clock Watcher Show from the lawn of 
WKBW every day, rain or shine. This 
gives Stan a grandstand seat on the 
busiest street in Buffalo,'* where an 
estimated 68,000 people pass Radio Cen- 
ter every day. Buffalo motorists look 
forward to seeing Stan under his bright 
red umbrella, and wave to him as they 
drive to work. 

A long and varied career has taught 
Stan that almost anything can happen 
in radio, and qualified him for handling 
the problems peculiar to broadcasting 
out-of-doors. He'll tell you about the 
gust of wind that threatened his posi- 
tion atop the high platform from which 
he greets listeners each morning. The 
gale caught hold of his umbrella, but 
athletic Stan held on to the umbrella, 
table — and, in addition, saved the mike. 



thermometer, clock, copy and model 
radio! — without disturbing the smooth 
pace of the show. 

Thirty-two-year-old Stan was bom 
in New York City, where he lived on 
Seventh Avenue and 41st Street, in the 
heart of the theatrical district. His 
mother and father owned a small store 
there, and many were the actresses and 
actors he met, since the store was right 
next-door to the Amsterdam Theatre — 
home of the Ziegfeld "Follies." He fell 
in love with show business, and nat- 
urally wanted to go into it himself. 

The Clock Watcher Show is popular 
because Stan provides sunny music and 
fi'iendly chatter at an hour in the 
morning when people need a lift. No 
matter what the weather brings, Stan 
is undaunted — and you can't help feel- 
ing that it is not such a bad world 
after all. 



Information 
Booth 



Gil Whitney 

Dear Editor: 

Could you please tell me who plays the 
part of Gil H hitney on the daytime drama, 
The Romance Of Helen Trent, and tell me 
something about him? 

C. L., Grand Ledge, Mich. 

David Gothaid portrays Gil Whitney. 
Mr. Gothard has spent most of his life 
in the three radio capitals — New York, 
Chicago and Los Angeles. Born in Beards- 
town. Illinois. Gothard moved to Los An- 
geles when he was nine years old. He 
completed high school there, and, since 
those were depression times, he went to 
work when he was graduated instead of 
going to college. When he was twenty he 
hitch-hiked to Chicago and managed to 
land a radio job there on his twenty-first 
birthday. In 1939. Mr. Gothard headed 
for New York where he has been acting in 
radio ever since. He is six feet tall, has 
light brown hair and blue eyes. 

Love Of Life 

Dear Editor: 

I would like to have some information on 
the young woman who portrays Vanessa 
Dale on the TV serial. Love Of Life. 

N. F., Toronto, Canada 

Peggy McCay. who plays Vanessa Dale 
on the CBS-TV serial. Love Of Life, was a 
drama major at Barnard College, just four 
years ago. and now she has a successful 
career well-launched. She has trouped the 
Midwest and South, played Broadway and 
TV. After she was graduated from Barnard. 
Peggy joined the Fordham University 
Players under the direction of Albert 
McCleery. Next she played several sum- 
mer stock engagements. But. in the fall of 
{Continued on page 26 j 




Peggy McCay 




I dreamed 

/went on a tiqer hunt in my 

maidenfbm 

I'm the daring young lady from Niger, 
Who smiles as she goes hunting tiger; 

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The best on the veldt . . . 
Or anyv^hereelse, says the tiger! 

The dream of a bra; Moidenform's Maidenette 

in acetate satin and lace; broadcloth 

and lace; or nylon taffeta 

with nylon marquisette ... from 1.50 

There is a maidenfurm 

for every type of figure.' 

Send for free style booklet. 

Maidenform, N. Y. 16 ^ 




• REG U. S PAT OP 




ASSIERE CO , INC COSTUMEl JOHN FREDERICS BUSH HELMETi CAVANAUO 



R 
M 

25 




JULIA ADAMS says, "Yes, I use Lustre-Creme Shampoo." In fact, in less than two 
years, Lustre-Creme has become the shampoo of the majority of top Hollywood 
stars! When America's most glamorous women — beauties like Julia Adams — use 
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For the Most Beautiful Hair in the World 

4 out of 5 Top Hollywood Stars 

use Lustre-Creme Shampoo 






t luslAe-^e 



R 

M 

26 



Glamour-made-easy! Even in 
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Fabulous Lustre-Creme 
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Thrilling news for 
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Information Booth 

(Continued) 

1949, her really big break came when .she 
was hired by Margo .Jones to play in 
"Summer and Smoke." 



vnne 



M 



alone 



Dear Editor: 

Can you please tell me whatever became 
of Anne Malone in the Young Dr. Malone 
daytime serial? 

G. H., Burlington, Vt. 

In the Young Dr. Malone drama, Anne 
died. Now Jerry is trying to make a new 
life for himself and their daughter. 

Audrey's Both 

Dear Editor: 

Is Audrey Meadows, who appears with 
Jackie Glea'son, also on the Bob And Ray 
show? 

M. M., Beechhurst, N. Y. 

Yes, Audrey appears on both shows. 

Gunsmoke 

Dear Editor: 

I would like some information about Bill 

Conrad, the star of Gunsmoke on radio. 

T. A., New York City 

Bill Conrad has played in hundreds of 
radio series and a score of motion pictures. 
He specializes in villains, but in real life 
he is a very nice guy. He is best known 
by his pals as being one of the ten most 
poorly dressed men in America. His favor- 
ite ensemble consists of a sack-like pair 
of blue linen slacks, a T-shirt, tennis 
sneakers and an old leather jacket — a 
relic of his Air Force days. Like Bing 
Crosby's loud sports shirts, Bill's dishev- 
eled apparel is his trademark. Bill is one 
of the busiest actors in Hollywood, but 
that doesn't stop him from relaxing, and 
when he does, he works harder at it than 
most people when they're working. Hobby- 
wise, aside from sleeping, Bill likes to 
cook, and his pretty wife lets him — to his 
heart's content. Sometimes they invite 
friends in to sample his recipes, and Bill 
always reminds them that — "We're not 
dressing. . . ." 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio-TV Mirror. 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. We'll ansiver, if we can, 
provided your question is of general in- 
terest. Answers will appear in this column 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 



% 



Lu Ann Simms' dreams 



have a wonderful 



way of coming true 





(MiutiG 



LITTLE MISS MIRACLE 



Godfrey and Lu Ann love the Florida sands — but not on their suits! 




By ANNE CANDY 



WHEN she was three years old, 
she went to an audition for an 
amateur show — Young Stars 
Of Tomorrow was the name of it — 
and they stood her up on a chair, and 
she won. The other contestants were 
old people of eight and nine, and 
stood square on the floor, and didn't 
have a chance. 

When she was twenty years old, 
she went on Arthur Godfrey's Talent 
Scouts program, and she sang a song 
called "Don't Take Your Love From 
Me," and she won. She cried, and 
Arthur Godfrey cried, and every- 
body in the audience cried, and a 
star, as they say, was born. And they 
called her Lu Ann Simms. 

The girl who grew into the star 
was actually bom on July 11, 1932, 
and christened Lucille Ann Cimi- 
nelli, in Rochester, New York. She 
loafed until she was three, then got 
the aforementioned job on Young 
Stars Of Tomorrow. She worked that 
program for a year and a half— it was 



See Next Page 



27 



Q/cfWiGodJ'iiMj. 



s 



LITTLE 
MISS MIRACLE 




-Uli^ 



'^ \l^ 



-^_iJ= 



For Julius La Rosa and Lu Ann Simms, being "little Godfreys" meoii 



broadcast over a local radio station — 
before she retired. 

The Ciminellis had a good kind of 
life in Rochester. They always lived 
in a house — no apartments for them 
— and there was always a stretch of 
grass where kids could play, or a 
tree to climb, or a baseball game to 
get into. Lu Ann is a baseball nut, 
who claims to be an ace catcher, and 
is good enough so the boys still don't 
mind letting her play. Even her 
brothers. Brother Sonny — just home 
fi-om Korea — is nineteen, brother 
Donnie is fourteen. 

"They're very fussy now," she says. 
"I'm supposed to call the nineteen- 
year-old one John, and the little 
one Donald. Nicknames are sissy — " 

Lu Ann went to Our Lady of 



Mercy High School in Rochester 
(it's a Catholic school for girls), 
sang in the glee club there, and at 
masses, and the annual school con- 
cert. She studied classical music for 
five years, faithfully practicing num- 
bers that hovered up around high C, 
but she had a feeling for popular 
music that couldn't be buried under 
a pile of arias. Her'singing teacher'd 
be "giving classical" in one room of 
her house, and Lu Ann would be in 
another room, "giving popular" in- 
struction to kids who cared about 
such things. 

Along about now, a tall dark man 
with a contract should have ap- 
peared, tapped Lu Ann on the shoul- 
der, and said, "Little girl, I'm going 
to skyrocket you to fame." And Lu 



Ann shoTild have smiled bravely, left \ 
her "popular" class with its small 
mouths open, and gone off into the 
sunset to be a success in Hollywood. 
But that only happens in the 
movies. Lu Ann wasn't considered 
a musical genius by anybody. She 
finished high school, and went to 
work to save enough money so she 
could start college. She wanted to 
be a doctor, which meant years of 
study, and her family — long on love, 
short on cash — couldn't help her 
much. Al Ciminelli works for the 
city of Rochester, and nobody who 
belongs to him ever went hungry, 
but he certainly doesn't make the 
kind of salary that enables a man 
to put his offspring through medical 
training. 



28 




There's time for play, as well as work, so Lu Ann practices 
a good diving-board spring with a helpful lifeguard's advice. 



requent trips to Florida. 



Anyhow, Lu Ann started selling 
records in a music store for thirty- 
three dollars a week. Supposedly, 
she never gave a thought to singing 
as a career, surrounded though she 
was by musical paraphernalia. She 
was dreaming of bone surgery, not 
a white Christmas, even as she gift- 
wrapped Bing Crosby. 

After a year-and-a-half of honest 
effort, she came to New York City 
on a visit. Not really New York 
City. City Island. That's way up in 
the Bronx, and a kind of resort where 
a lot of rich people keep their yachts. 
Lu Ann's aunt and uncle were work- 
ing in a restaurant at City Island, 
and it was this aunt and uncle she'd 
come down to visit. There was a 
trio playing (Continued on page 70) 




ti^ 



Lu Ann Simms is heard and seen on Arthur 
Godfrey Time and Arthur Godfrey And His 
Friends (see page 35 for full schedule). 



29 



LITTLE 
MISS MIRACLE 



broadcast over a local radio station — 
before she retired. 

The Ciminellis had a good kind of 
life in Rochester. They always lived 
in a house— no apartments for them 
— and there was always a stretch of 
grass where kids could play, or a 
tree to climb, or a baseball game to 
get into. Lu Ann is a baseball nut, 
who claims to be an ace catcher, and 
is good enough so the boys still don't 
mind letting her play. Even her 
brothers. Brother Sonny — just home 
flom Korea — is nineteen, brother 
Donnie is fourteen, 

"They're very fussy now," she says. 
"I'm supposed to call the nineteen- 
year-old one John, and the little 
one Donald. Nicknames are sissy — " 

Lu Ann went to Our Lady of 




There's time for play, as well as work, so Lu Ann practic 
a good diving-board spring with a helpful lifeguord's odvlc 



For Julius La Rosa and Lu Ann Simms, being "little Godfreys" means frequent trips to Florida 



Mercy High School in Rochester 
(it's a Catholic school for girls), 
sang in the glee club there, and at 
masses, and the annual school con- 
cert. She studied classical music for 
five years, faithfully practicing num- 
bers that hovered up around high C, 
but she had a feeling for popular 
music that couldn't be buried under 
a pile of arias. Her'singing teacher'd 
be "giving classical" in one room of 
her house, and Lu Ann would be in 
another room, "giving popular" in- 
struction to kids who cared about 
such things. 

Along about now, a tall dark man 
with a contract should have ap- 
peared, tapped Lu Ann on the shoul- 
der, and said, "Little girl, I'm going 
to skyrocket you to fame " And Lu 



Ann should have smiled bravely, left 
her "popular" class with its smaB 
mouths open, and gone off into the 
sunset to be a success in Hollywood. 
But that only happens in the 
movies. Lu Ann wasn't considered 
a musical genius by anybody. She 
finished high school, and went to 
work to save enough money so she 
could start college. She wanted to 
be a doctor, which meant years of 
study, 'and her family — ^long on love, 
short on cash — couldn't help her 
much. Al Ciminelli works for the 
city of Rochester, and nobody who 
belongs to him ever went hungry, 
but he certainly doesn't make the 
kind of salary that enables a man 
to put his offspring through medical 
training. 



Anyhow, Lu Ann started seUing 
words in a music store for thirty- 
wee doUars a week. Supposedly, 
sne never gave a thought to singing 
„ « career, surrounded though she 
w^ H """.^'"^^ paraphernalia. She 
awt,- ^"""^ of bone surgery, not 
lite Christmas, even as she gift- 
*rapped Bing Crosby. 
efiorT'^u y^^'-and-a-half of honest 
Oft, she came to New York City 

Citv p^"- ^"* ^^^^y New York 
th/g "y Island. That's way up in 
a lot 7""' ^"^ ^ ^"^^ °^ resort where 
Ly y^ y'* people keep their yachts, 
ing j ^ ^""t and uncle were work- 
and it ^ ''^^*='^"'^t at City Island, 
com» J ^^ *'s aunt and uncle she'd 
trioni ■ " '" ^'^"- There was a 
flaying (Continued on page 70) 




eijii*. 



s5!=aaHa 



29 



MR. AMATEUR HOUR 




Ted Mack believed in 



helping others — this 
faith led him along the 



golden path to fame 



Above, Ted's famous wheel. .Below, his "Mr. V.I.P. 
of 1951" — Pfc. Anthony Troilo — being congrotulated by 
Harry S. Truman, then President of the United States. 



30 





Before broadcasting, Ted directed music for such films as "The Great Ziegfeld." 



By ARTHUR MORRIS 



A SMALL boy, not yet in his teens, huddles in a dark closet, 
his nimble fingers feeling the keys of a saxophone almost 
as big as he. With determination set on his face, he begins 
to play. The same scene is repeated many times and, as 
days grow into weeks and weeks into months, he finally 
harnesses the rich tone of the instrument. Little does he 
realize that this saxophone is shortly to become his bread 
and butter, this detemiination his greatest asset. 

Still in knee pants, this youngster learned early in life 
what it means to struggle but to (Continued on page 79) 



Ted Mack and The Original Amateur Hour are seen and heard on NBC-TV, 
each Saturday at 8:30 P.M. EDT, as sponsored by the Pet Milk Company. 




It was Lou Goldberg who brought 
Ted and the Amateur Hour together. 



Ted's show entertained troops in Korea, presenting such local G.I. talent as the "Kumwha Valley Boys. 




} ^ 



I 



A w 



I !• < .; I ! I ! I ■ t • 



31 



GARRY MOORE— Be True 



Garry's a great guy to have os "boss," according to Durward Kirby (left), Ken Carson (right) — and others. 

"If 



t 




Conferring with writer Bill Dennling, assistant Shirley Reeser, producer Herb Sanford — inspecting a kinescope of Denise 




II 





)to yourself 



I 



^^All the corny things 
people are reluctant to 
talk about — loyalty, 
dignity, understanding- 
are present on our show. 



>5 



By GREGORY MERWIN 



THE Shangri-La of TV is in the Mans- 
field Theatre, just west of Broadway, 
where the Garry Moore Show is 
rehesirsed and telecast five days a week. 
Although in some other theatres stars 
may scream, here Garry zmd his director 
speak courteously in low voices. Elsewhere 
a female singer may plot to upstage her 
male counterpart, but here Denise Lor is 
comparing notes with Ken Carson about 
their respective children. The air is calm and 
business-like, to be sure, but relaxed. 
"The secret," (Continued on page 92) 




Jimmy Durante — ex-partner, firm friend, Professor of Humility! 



The Garry Moore Show, CBS-TV, M-F, 1 :30 P.M. EDT, under the sponsor- 
ship of Ballard Biscuits, Rit and Shinola, Stokely-Van Camp, Deepfreeze, 
Kellogg's Gro-Pup, Hoover Vacuum Cleaners, and Purex. Garry also emcees 
I've Got A Secret. CBS-TV, Wed.. 9:30 P.M. EDT, for Cavalier Cigarettes. 



Lor and himself — Garry's always seeking ways to improve his shows. 



Relaxing at home with his Springer spaniel, Sam. 





■^J^W 



GARRY MOORE— Be True 

Garry', a great guy to have as "boss," occording to Durward Kirby (l eft), Ken Carson (right)— and others. 




to yourself 

''All the corny things 
people are reluctant to 
talk about — loyalty, 
dignity, understanding — 
are present on our show. " 

By GREGORY MERWIN 



THE Shangri-La of TV is in the Mans- 
field Theatre, just west of Broadway, 
where the Garry Moore Show is 
rehearsed and telecast five days a week. 
Although in some other theatres stars 
may scream, here Garry and his director 
speak covui;eously in low voices. Msewhere 
a female singer may plot to upstage her 
male counterpart, but here Denise Lor is 
comparing notes vrith Ken Carson about 
their respective children. The air is calm and 
business-like, to be sure, but relaxed. 
"The secret," (Continued on page 92) 




Jimmy Durante — ex-partner, firm friend, Professor of Humility! 



The Garry. Moore Show, CBSTV. M-F. 1 :.in P.M. EI) T, under the sponsor- 
ship of Ballard Biscuits, Ril and Shinola, StokelyVan Clamp, Deepfreeze, 
Kellogg's Gro-Pup, Hoover Vacuum Cleaners, and Piirex. Garry also emcees 
Tve Got A Secret, CBS-TV, Wed., 9:.10 P.M. EDT, for Cavalier Ciuarelles. 



Conferring with writer Bill Demling, ossistant Shirlev ReB^r r.rr.A,..^ u l c r , - , , „ • 

y, unr oniriey Keeser, producer Herb Sanford— inspecting a kinescope of Denise 




orond himself — Garry's always seeking ways to improve his shows. 



Relaxing at home with his Springer spaniel, Sam. 



m 





Hospitalized or working, Godfrey relies on his own strength to pull himself up where he wants to be. 

COURAGEOUS IS THE WORD 



34 



Charac+erisfically, just before his operation, Godfrey was busy in Florida — carrying out three projects at once! 




There wits drama in the hospital 
roorrif drama in Miami— drama 
wherever Godfrey happens to be 



By PHILIP CHAPMAN 

AT THE Phillips House in Boston, Massachusetts, 
/\ newsmen gathered around the bedside of Arthur 

Godfrey. Out in the hall, nurses were bustling 
about on the off-chance they, too, could glimpse 
the jovial redhead. Adjusting himself by overhanging 
pulleys, Godfrey laughed and joked with the reporters 
just as he has done hundreds of times before, 
on less serious occasions. 

"If the Good Lord is willing, about this time next 
year I will be able to get arotind with no trouble," 
he said. 

A day later, Arthur Godfrey underwent the first 
of the two operations {Ccmtinued on page 71) 



Arthur Godfrey Time, heard on CBS Radio, M-F, 10 to 11 :30 A.M.— 
seen on CBS-TV, M-Th, 10 to 11 A.M. — for Snow Crop, Kleenex, 
Fiberglas, Star-Kist, Pepsodent, Frigidaire, Pillsbury, Nabisco, 
Toni, Chesterfield. Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts, CBS Radio and 
CBS-TV (simulcast), Mon., 8:30 P.M., for Thomas J. Upton, Inc. 
Arthur Godfrey And His Friends, seen on CBS-TV, Wed., 8 P.M., for 
Chesterfield Cigarettes, Toni, Pillsbury. (All times given EDT.) 



FOR ARTHUR 





Secure in Jim's love, Jocelyn knows she must somehow find a way 
to win the heart of his young daughter Janie, too. 



36 



Jocelyn's marriage to Dr. Jim Brent 
creates problems along the 

ROAD 

OF 

LIFE 



WHAT strange twists the road of life 
takes, Jocelyn thought as she timed 
her steps to the honored music of the 
wedding march. There were so many 
shadowy places along the way — and now 
the glorious sunshine of a love which 
she hoped could always remain bright 
and beautiful. Momentarily, she caught 
her breath as she at last stood beside Dr. 
Jim Brent, tall, handsome. His beloved 
face bent down over her and his smile 
confidently conveyed his kindness, his 
strength of character. As the minister 
intoned the solemn lines which pro- 
nounced Jocelyn the wife of Dr. Jim 
Brent, the young bride uttered a silent 
prayer: "God grant us the power to solve 
our problems, and the wisdom to put be- 
hind us thpse we cannot overcome." In 
the days that followed her wedding, 
Jocelyn was to think again and again of 
this prayer. Within the framework of the 
life she assumed, by marrying Jim, is the 
care of his ten-year-old daughter. Relying 
on the power of her own heart to guide 
her, Jocelyn daily faces the problem of 
Janie's jealousy, Janie's resentment of 
Jocelyn's marriage to her father. No mat- 
ter which way Jocelyn turns in her at- 



tempt to win Janie to her, there is Aunt 
Reggie encouraging an insidious worship . 
of the memory of the child's "real mother." 
Even Jim, vnth. all his understanding, all 
his calm assurance, is helpless to combat 
Aunt Reggie's influence. Aunt Reggie is 
his dead mother's sister, a woman who 
cared for him, brought him up when his 
mother was still a bedridden invalid. Aunt 
Reggie, in her own way, loves Jim — but 
Aunt Reggie finds little satisfaction in love 
except the power love provides to possess 
and control. It is this power which she 
wields over Jim — and now over Janie — 
that makes her an impossible adversary 
for Jocelyn. What should Jocelyn do? In 
her heart she knows that she can never 
replace Janie's mother, but she has so 
much love to give Janie, if only she can 
find a way of appealing to her heart. Like 
any little girl of ten, Janie needs this love, 
craves it, must have it if she is to grow into 
a wholesome woman. Throughout the 
days that slowly pass, Jocelyn has only 
one reassuring thing to cling to — Jim. 
The deep love they hold for each other 
makes Jocelyn believe that, with patience 
and prayer, somehow, sometime, the prob- 
lem of Janie will be solved. 



The Road Of Life, M-F— NBC Radio, 3:15 P.M. EDT— CBS Radio, 1 P.M. EDT— for Crisco and Ivory Soap. 
Don MacLaughJin and Virginia Dwyer are pictured here in their roles as Dr. Jim Brent and Jocelyn. 



37 




Jocelyn's nrnrnage to Dr. Jim Brent 
creates problems along the 

ROAD 

OF 

LIF 



WHAT strange twists the road of life 
takes, Jccelyn thought as she timed 
her steps to the honored music of the 
wedding march. There were so many 
sfhadowy places along the way — and now 
the glorious sunshine of a love which 
she hoped could always remain bright 
and beautiful. Momentarily, she caught 
her breath as she at last stood beside Dr. 
Jim Brent, tall, handsome. His beloved 
face bent down over her and his smile 
confidently conveyed his kindness, his 
strength of character. As the minister 
intoned the solemn lines which pro- 
nounced Jocelyn the wife of Dr. Jim 
Brent, the young bride uttered a silent 
prayer: "God grant us the power to solve 
our problems, and the wisdom to put be- 
hind us those we cannot overcome." In 
the days that followed her wedding, 
Jocelyn was to think again and again of 
this prayer. Within the framework of the 
life she assumed, by marrying Jim, is the 
care of his ten-year-old daughter. Relying 
on the power of her own heart to guide 
her, Jocelyn daily faces the problem of 
Janie's jealousy, Janie's resentment of 
Jocelyn's marriage to her father. No mat- 
ter which way Jocelyn turns in her at- 



tempt to win Janie to her, there is Aunt 
Reggie encouraging an insidious worship, 
of the memory of the child's "real mother." 
Even Jim, with all his understanding, all 
his calm assurance, is helpless to combat 
Aunt Reggie's influence. Aunt Reggie is 
his dead mother's sister, a woman who 
cared for him, brought him up when his 
mother was still a bedridden invalid. Aunt 
Reggie, in her own way, loves Jim — but 
Aunt Reggie finds little satisfaction in love 
except the power love provides to possess 
and control. It is this power which she 
wields over Jim — and now over Janie — 
that makes her an impossible adversary 
for Jocelyn. What should Jocelyn do? In 
her heart she knows that she can never 
replace Janie's mother, but she has so 
much love to give Janie, if only she can 
find a way of appealing to her heart Like 
any little girl of ten, Janie needs this love, 
craves it, must have it if she is to grow into 
a wholesome woman. Throughout the 
days that slowly pass, Jocelyn has only 
one reassuring thing to cling to — Jim. 
The deep love they hold for each other 
makes Jocelyn believe that, with patience 
and prayer, somehow, sometime, the prob- 
lem of Janie will be solved. 



Secure in Jim's love, Jocelvn tnr,u,c ,1,. 

.o .in tKe Koo. of his vol, dTife! E.^f ^ ''"' ° 



The Road Of Life, .M-F— NBC Radio. 3:15 P.M. EDT— CBS Radio, 1 P.M. BDT— for Criiico and Ivory Soap. 
Don MacUughJin and Virginia Dwyer are pictured here in iheir roles as Dr. Jim Brent and Jocelyn. 




He looks — and 
sounds — like he hasn't 
a care in the world, but 
don't let that fool you! 

By PAULINE SWANSON 



CATCH Hoagy Carmichael on his big 
new Saturday Night Revue 
(replacing Your Show of Shows 
for the summer on NBC-TV) and 
you'll see a man who's relaxed, 
carefree, having himself a ball. 
(You thmk.) 

Rocking away at the punch-drim.k 
piano, singing dry songs in his 
familiar Indiana twang, slyly topping 
the jokes of the perspiring comics, 
rolling his beat-up old hat which is 
becoming almost as much a trademark 
as Will Rogers' ten-gallon topper, he 
looks — and sounds — like a guy who 
is as much at home before the cameras 
as he is in his own Uving room. 

It's an optical illusion. 

He's taut as an E-string, and he 
will worry right up to the moment 
of sign-off that something will 
go wrong. 

As for that hat: "I gotta have 
that hat," he'll tell you, "to hang on 
to. That hat covers up a multitude of 
sins . . . like when I forget the lyrics 
to a song or something." 

"Or something" . . . some catastrophe 
that has never happened, and 
probably never will, but which Hoagy 
consistently and un-confidently 
expects. (Continued on page 69) 



Hoagy Carmichael is starred in Saturday Night 
Revue, over NBC-TV, Saturday, at 9 P.M. EDT. 



II 



Hoagy Carmichael is 



38 





With Fabien Sevi+zky, who conducted his symphonic music 



The "Stardust" composer with his wife, Ruthie 



And Hoogy serenading his mother, Mrs. Lyda Carmichael. 



like this 




LILI DARVAS 




Oeloved Hannah of Hilltop House, 

Mrs. Norris of When a Girl Marries — 

Lili Darvas is a woman who knows 
what she wants out of life 



By MARY TEMPLE 



WHEN Lili Darvas was asked to 
play the role of Hannah, the 
cook, on the dramatic radio 
serial Hilltop House, she thought 
at once of the cook in her childhood 
home in Budapest. The way she 
portrays Hannah has therefore 
been built around her memories of 
this cook, of her homely wisdom and 
her kindness to the children. 

"This. good-natured woman who 
came to work for us — and remained 
to become a loved member of our 
household for twentyr-three years 
— was not only a magnificent cook, 
but an angel to all of us. In the 
pre -Hitler Europe in which I grew 
up and where my father was a 
doctor, all middle-class families were 
able to have such servants, devoted 
to those they worked for, bossing m 
the children and spoiling them at W 
the same time. If we wanted cookies 
and our (Continued on page 80) 



li 



40 




Heavenly Homebody 




Truly regal on the stage. Lili Darvas triumphed as 
theQueervin MauriceEvans' production of "Hamlet." 



Friendly and gay at home, she pampers on aging 
but affectionate pet who is known as "Mommie." 




Europe — ^the scene of early triumphs (but in 
America she found the home she'd always wanted). 




Lili Darvas is heard in Hilltop House, over CBS Radio, 
M-F, 3 P.M., EDT.for Alka-Seltzer (Miles Laboratories) — 
When A Girl Marries, ABC Radio, M-F, 10:45 A.M. EDT. 



41 



^ 



ULI DARVAS- 




Beloved Hannah of Hilltop House, 

Mrs. Norms of When a Girl Marries— 

Lili Darvas is a woman who knows 
what she wants out of life 



By MARY TEMPLE 



WHEN Lili Darvas was asked to 
play the role o£ Hannah, the 
cook, on the dranf\atic radio 
serial Hilltop House, she thought 
at once of the cook in her childhood 
home in Budapest. The way she 
portrays Hannah has therefore 
been built arotind her memories of 
this cook, of her homely wisdom and 
her kindness to the children. 

"This. good-natured woman who 
came to work for us — and remained 
to become a loved member of our 
household for twentyrthree years 
— was not only a magnificent cook, 
but an angel to all of us. In the 
pre-Hitler Europe in which I grew 
up and where my father was a 
doctor, all middle-class families were 
able to have such servants, devoted 
to those they worked for, bossing 
the children and spoUing them at 
the same time. If we wanted cookies 
and our (Continued on page 80) 



Heavenly Homebody 




Europe — the scene of early triumphs (but in 
America she found the home she'd alwoys wanted). 



Truly regal on the stage, Lili Darvas triumphed as 
the Queen in Maurice Evans' production of "Hamlet." 



Friendly and gay at home, she pampers an aging 
but affectionate pet who is known as "Mommie." 



r 'TUfBWnim 





Lili Danan is heard in Hilltop House, over CBS Radio, 
M-F, 3 P.M.. EDT.for Allta-Seluer (Mile* Laboraloriea) — 
When A Girl Marries, ABC Radio, MF, 10:45 A.M. EDT. 



Love 
Lives 
with 

MILLIE 



Richard thinks his mother can 
handle anything, even tigers. He 
and "pardner" Jeff Brinkley 
(in plaid shirt) are nnighty proud 
because Elena can twirl a toy 
shootin'-iron like o real cowboy! 




Meet Millie 




Charles "stood her up" on their first date — but 
he knew the answer when she asked: "Do you love me?' 



By BETTY GOODE 



ELENA Verdugo, the cute, blonde, vivacious Millie Bronson of radio-TV's 
Meet Millie, lives with her writer-husband, Charles Marion, in a modest 
bungalow on a sun-bright street in Westwood, California. The house 
isn't much different from the other modest bungalows but, somehow or other, 
its bright-shining outward appearance immediately telegraphs that 
happiness lives inside. It has a cherished look, a friendly look. And its 
occupants — Elena, Charles and baby Richard— have the same appearance. 

Each member of the family wears a cheerful optimism which is really 
part of their wardrobe. They wear it all the time, both day and night, and 
you can be certain they are always in style. Optimism, {Continued on page 82) 

Elena Verdugo stars in the title role of Meet Millie, heard on CBS Radio, Thurs., 8 P.M. 
EDT, for Brylcreem, Nescafe, and Lava Soap— seen on CBS-TV, Sat., 9:30 P.M. EDT. 




ii 



42 




4lias Elena Verdugo—cute, blonde and wonderfully happy 




r 



»-^' 




:/Wf* 









V 



•^> 



EDDIE FISHER'S LIFE STOR\ 




tijGlml^^ 



Back where it all started, at WFIL in 
Philadelphia: Eddie, partner Joey Fornnan, 
Fred Bonaparte, Eddie Cantor, Bernie 
Rich; at back. Skipper .Dawes, who first 
put the Fisher-Forman duo on the air. 




New York debut: Eddie in costume for a 
production nunnber at the Copacabana with 
a Copa cutie. Historic meeting in 1949 
at Grossinger's: Cantor introduces Eddie, 
hears him sing — and makes an epic offer. 



NOT SINCE Sinatra had it happened. But 
last April, it happened again. The kids 
were bringing their lunches to the 
Paramount, and sitting through five shows, 
and screaming and tearing their hair out, 
and beating their fists on the heads of the 
kids in front. 

They were swooning for Eddie, not Frankie. 
but you couldn't tell one disease from the 
other, without a program. A brand-new 
generation of high-school students — -or, 
at least, students who should have been in 
high school instead of playing hookey at 
the Paramount — had it bad. 

The boy they were all hooting for is 
Eddie Fisher, born August 10, 1928, in 
Philadelphia, with a golden throat instead 
of a silver spoon. 

The Fisher family was big — seven kids 
all told, three older, three younger than Eddie. 
Money was scarce, but noise, music, 



I 



44 




EDDIE FISHER'S LIFE STORY 




Tribute: Al Jolson's widow and former accompanist 
Horry Akst are witnesses as Eddie gives a gold record 
of his "Goodbye, G.I. Al" to little Asa Jolson. 





Thrill of a lifetime: Eddie entertaining the tro< 



laughter, babies to trip over, the Fisher home was 
full of these. 

Eddie's mother, still in Philadelphia — ^has just 
bought a new house. "Four bathrooms," Eddie says. 
Those days, they didn't have a house of their own, 
but moved around from place to place, and there 
were times when there'd be two, three kids sleeping 
in one bed, and the family lucky to have four rooms, 
let alone four baths. 

Eddie's father makes luggage now. Those days, he 
huckstered vegetables. Joe Fisher had an old car 
he'd converted into a vegetable truck and, if you'd 
lived in Philadelphia then, you could have seen the 
eleven-year-old Eddie, a basket hanging from his, 



Coronation: Listeners vote a virtual tie, and 
deejay Brad Phillips crowns both Como and Fisher! 



Off to the greatest adventure of all: Fans wave 

a fond farewell as Eddie is inducted into the Army. 



46 






at a dance in Pat+on Lounge, Heidelberg, Germany — on the other side of the world, "somewhere in Korea." 



skinny arms, trudging through the alleys yelling 
about bananas and cabbages. 

His family teases him, claiming those days of hol- 
lering in the streets developed his lungs. 

Eventually, he took his developed lungs to a Phila- 
delphia radio station which hired him and his friend. 
Joey Forman, a youth of eleven — Eddie was twelve — 
to do songs, snappy patter and commercials. The 
radio station didn't want to insult them by offering 
them money, so our two artists got paid their carfare 
— fifteen cents a week — for quite a long time. 

Until one day Joey looked at Eddie and Eddie 
looked at Joey, and they pondered out loud. "We're 
worth more," they said. "Anybody's worth more." 



They went to the money man at the radio station, 
and put it to him straight. "Five dollars a .week, or 
we quit." 

"Sure, boys," the man said. And, with a wave of 
his hand, he made them millionaires." 

By the time they were fifteen and sixteen respec- 
tively, they were doing four radio programs, and 
Eddie'd amassed a huge teen-age following. One of the 
shows was sponsored by a milk company, and the 
milk company had Eddie's (Continued on page 98) 

Coke Time Starring Eddie Fisher, seen on NBC-TV, W, F, 7:30 
P.M., and heard on NBC Radio, Tu, F, 8 P.M. (Mutual— M, Th, 
10:30 P.M.). All EDT, sponsored by The Coca-Cola Company. 



Presenting the family: Cousin Dolores at far left, Eddie and his Mom, 

sisters Eileen and Miriam; right, Eddie with kid brother Alvin, his prize "recruit." 





% 



EDDIE FISHER'S LIFE STORY 




Reunion in Florido: The two Eddies with Jennie 
Grossinger, who's helped to launch so many careers. 




L 



Off to the greotest adventure of oil: Fans wove 
a fond farewell as Eddie is inducted into the Army 




Thrill of a lifetime: Eddie entertaining the troopi at a dance in Pat+on Lounge, Heidelberg 



laughter, babies to trip over, the Fisher home was 
full of these. 

Eddie's mother, still in Philadelphia— has just 
bought a new house. "Four bathrooms," Eddie says. 
Those days, they didn't have a house of their own, 
but moved around from place to place, and there 
were times when there'd be two, three kids sleeping 
in one bed, and the family lucky to have four rooms, 
let alone four baths. 

Eddie's father makes luggage now. Those days, he 
huckstered vegetables. Joe Fisher had an old car 
he'd converted into a vegetable truck and, if you'd 
lived in Philadelphia then, you could have seen the 
eleven-year-old Eddie, a basket hanging from his 



Coronotion: Listeners vote a virtual tie, and 
deejay Brad Phillips crowns both Como and Fisher! 



on the other side of the world, "somewhere in Korea. 




skinny arms, trudging through the alleys yelling 
about bananas and cabbages. 

His family teases him, claiming those days of hol- 
lermg m the streets developed his lungs. 

Eventually, he took his developed lungs to a Phila- 
delphia radio station which hired him and his friend. 
Joey Formari, a youth of eleven— Eddie was twelve— 
to do songs, snappy patter and commercials. The 
ladio station didn't want to insult them by offering 
them money, so our two artists got paid their carfare 
—fifteen cents a week— for quite a long time. 

Until one day Joey looked at Eddie and Eddie 
looked at Joey, and they pondered out loud. "We're 
worth more," they said. "Anybody's worth more." 



They went to the money man at the radio station, 
and put it to him straight. "Five dollars a .week, or 
we quit." 

"Sure, boys," the man said. And, with a wave of 
his hand, he made them millionaires.' 

By the time they were fifteen and sixteen respec- 
tively, they were doing four radio programs, and 
Eddie'd amassed a huge teen-age following. One of the 
shows was sponsored by a milk company, and the 
milk company had Eddie's (Continued on page 98) 

ColtP Time Slarrinu Eddie Fisher, siren on NltC-TV, W, F, 7:30 
P.M., and heard on NBC Radio, Tu, F. B P.M. (Mutual— M. Th. 
10:30 P.M.). All EDT. sponsored l.y The Cora-Cola Company. 



Presenting the family: Cousin Dolores at far left, Eddie and his Mom, 
sisters Eileen and Miriam; right, Eddie with Icid brother Alvin, his prize "recr 




/ 





'i^^t^l 



'^S^ 



t^^ 



-?.a 



EASY TO LIVE WITH ^ 



48 



Bill Cullen loves gadgets, 
spaghetti — and his wife, who 
thinks he's ''special," too 

Bv MARTIN COHEN 



He'll buy almost anything — though the 
family closets are already bulging with 
previous purchases. He's a pushover for 
any new hobby or game — particularly if it 
requires lots of equipment and plenty of space. 
He's only home for dinner on weekends. 
In fact, his wife can be sure of seeing or 
hearing him only if she turns the dial to almost 
any network, almost any time of day — for 
Bill Cullen stars in Walk A Mile on NBC 
Radio, I've Got A Secret on CBS-TV, Where 
Was I? on Du Mont Television, Fun For 
All on CBS Radio, plus sundry shows 
in -season on other networks. 

But. to Carol Cullen, her Bill is definitely 
the ideal husband. Many of. the things he 
buys are for her, often in duplicate. Many 
of the hobbies are 'shared enthusiasms. 
All the weekends are wonderfxil. It all adds to 
the fun of being a Cullen-by-marriage, 
and only helps prove that Quipmaster Cullen, 
the nimble-brained emcee who's so quick 
with wit and cash, is equally free with his 
wit and cash in private Ufe. 

"Bill is sensible and smart," insists 
Carol, herself a singing (Continued on page 73) 



Bill Cullen emcees Walk A Mile, over NBC Radio, Wed., 
8 P.M., for Camels, and is also heard on Fun For All, 
CBS Radio, Sat., 1 P.M., for Prom and White Rain, and 
Give And Take, CBS Radio, Sat., 11:30 A.M., for Cannon 
Mills. He is seen on I've Got A Secret, over CBS-TV, 
Wed., 9:30 P.M., for Cavalier Cigarettes, and Where 
Was I?. Du Mont Television, Tues., 10 P.M. (ALL EDT.) 



and FUN! 




When Carol married Bill, she soon leorned there 
were no big problems about the bride's own 
cooking — but what about the bridegroom's? 




Bill enjoys being at the controls of almost 
anything mechanical — whether a plane, a high- 
powered radio, or the latest thing in cameras. 




BERT PARKS - 

"I'm the average man" 

He's a human dynamo who plays 

hunches and thinks there isn't an exceptional 

thing about himself, but — 



By GLADYS HALL 



BERT Parks drew a picture for me the other 
day — the picture of Bert Parks as Bert Parks 
sees himself. It all began with a chance re- 
mark concerning the odd notions still entei-tained 
about people in show business and how they live. 

"I don't exactly know how people in show busi- 
ness are supposed to live," Bert said. "Jumping 
and screaming, maybe? Feudin' and fussin', maybe? 
In the Barrymore tradition, maybe? Dangerously, 
that is. Maybe. But I don't live like that. Or be- 
have like that. Or even think like that. I live a very 
average kind of existence. Come to think of it," 
said the super-charged emcee of Break The Bank 
and Double Or Nothing, "I am the average man." 

But what, the question then arose, is the 
"average" man? You hear about him. You read 
about him. But who, exactly, and what, exactly, 
is he? 

"I am he," Bert laughed. And added, "I'll pro- 
ceed to prove it. 

"As a starter, let's take my appearance — I am a 
fellow of average height and weight with dark 



hair and brown eyes and an unremarkable set of 
features." (You wUL note Bert omits to sketch in 
the winning smUe, the vitaUty that makes sparks.) 
"I haven't the Barrymore profile. I'm not a six- 
footer and I don't, to coin a phrase, stand out in a 
crowd. 

"A more impersonal — and so, more telling — 
proof of my averageness came fi-om a motorcycle 
cop who waved me to a stop one day as I was 
speeding down the highway from my home not 
far from New York City. (My one extravagance is 
automobiles — and travel. Love automobiles and 
have the itchy foot, two of 'em!) After asking for 
my identification, 'What do you do,' the scowling 
gendarme inquired, 'for a living?' 

" 'I'm in television,' I said meekly. 

" 'Oh,' said the cop, 'you {Continued on page 68) 

Bert Parks emcees Double Or Nothing, heard over ABC Radio, 
M-F, 11 :30 A.M.— and seen on CBS-TV, M, W, F, 2 P.M.— for 
Campbell's Soups. He also emcees Break The Bank, as seen on 
NBC-TV, Tues., 8 :30 P.M. for 5-Day Deodorant Pads. All EDT. 



Typical American family (with 

twins!) — Bert and Annette Parks, sons Jeffrey 

and Joel, and baby daughter Annette. 



51 




BREAKS THE BANK 




First miracle: 



prisoner 



war 



By MRS. GEORGE F. HART 



IT WAS faith in God that brought about two 
miracles in one month. My son George had been 
reported missing in action in Korea. So often 
this means that the soldier has been killed. His 
return by the enemy marked one of the happiest 
days in my life. Then it was only forty-eight hours 
later that we won $8,550 for him on Break The 
Bank. It was prayer that made both great 
joys possible. 

My husband is George F. Hart, a clerk in the 
postal service. My name is Emma. We are a 
middle-aged couple with four children ranging 
from fifteen to twenty-eight. We have never been 
wealthy, ridh or even well-to-do, but we are a 
happy family, grateful for {Continued on page 91) 

Break The Bank is seen on NBC-TV — as emceed by Bud Col- 
Iyer, M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, under multiple sponsorship— as emceed 
by Bert Parks, Tues., 8 :30 P.M. EDT, for 5-Day Deodorant Pads. 
(Heard M-F, with Bud CoUyer, NBC Radio, 10:30 A.M. EDT.) 



Celebrations: Girl friend Mary Theresa Schwing joins George and Emma Hart as they get the good news of 
their son's release — and hospital buddies congratulate Pfc. Hart on the "nest egg" his family won for him. 




Second miracle: The Harts and their doughter Marilyn win $8,550 on Break The Bank, as Bud Collyer beams 




Prayers brought a beloved son back to his family 
and are giving him a new start in life 



i 



53 







I 



Xu 




■\ 



t 



I. Alice tells Chichi and Papa David she wonts to stop working , 

on Her husband Doug's paper, stay honne and keep house for hinn. 'm 

Chichi's full of enthusiasm — Papa David listens philosophically. 



When a woman loves a man — as Grace loved Ted — is there any limit 



54 





2. Impressed by Grace Sarcine's eagerness to work 
on a paper — ^though something about her appearance 
strikes a false note — Alice hires her to help Doug. 



to the sacrifices she should malce? 



IT WAS one of those hot, sticky, humid 
evenings in summer when the coolness 
of the bookshop felt good to its 
occupants, Chichi Conrad and Papa David, 
Alice and Doug. Perhaps it was the heat 
that was shimmering from the sidewalks 
outside, perhaps the contrast of the 
evening's quiet to the day's frantic hustle 
and bustle, that started off the heated 
argument which was in progress. Papa 
David was being his usual calm self, 
half-smiling at some of Chichi's intense 
obsei'vations, half-frowning at others. He 
listened to Doug carefully and cautiously, 
weighing carefully every statement 
which Doug made. ... It was simple — in 



3. Young Danny is puzzled by Grace's odd 
behavior — but he hesitates to tell Alice, 
who is so happy in her new-found freedom. 



i 




LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 





4. Unaware of the sordid undercurrents sweeping 
through their lives, Alice revels in the feminine 
business of shopping, mending, and making a home. 



5. But perhaps Grace is being too helpful? She writes 



Chichi's mind — ^for anyone to follow her thoughts. She 
was contending that there were a vast number of women 
who loved men who are weak, characterless, but that 
nevertheless this did not necessarily make the woman in- 
volved less of a good human being. Doug, whose wife 
Alice sat next to him, was arguing that all this might be 
true — but it didn't make the woman any less "gvulty" 
for hiding or defending such a weak character when a 
crime had been committed. . . . All four persons in the 
bookstore knew that they were arguing about Grace 
Garcine. Grace had entered their lives some months be- 
fore, when Alice had decided that she would retire from 



The cast, as pictured here, includes: 

Chichi Conrad Teri Keane 

Papa David Ralph Locke 

Doug Norman George Petrie 

Alice Norman • , Elsie Hitz 

Grace Garcine Amzie Strickland 

Ted Terry O'SuUivan 

. Danny Clifford Sales 

Life Can Be Beautiful, NBC Radio, M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, for Tide. 



her business partnership with Doug to assxmie her right- 
ftd role as his wife: Chichi had suggested, when Alice 
came to this decision, that Doug hire someone to help 
in the newspaper oflBce. Grace had applied for the job 
and Doug and Alice had gratefully accepted her applica- 
tion. She was a speedy tj^jist, very alert, with a slight 
knowledge of newspaper work. . . . Ldttle had happened 
those first few weeks — ^little that was out of the ordinary, 
that is. Grace had taken a room in Mrs. Schwartz's flat, 
joined Rev. Dr. Chandler's choir, and helped Father 
McGary at the Settlement House. Alice had been very 
happy about the arrangement, for it gave her time to fix 
up the flat, mend Doug's clothes, prepare meals for Doug 
which he could relax over and enjoy when he came home 
tired from the newspaper office. ... It wasn't imtil the 
incident of the gun that Alice became concerned. Alice 
began noticing the nxmiber of times when Doug was late 
now because he had to be with Grace during her training 
period. She noticed Grace's rather obviously blondined 
hair but — ^more significantly — ^^when she read her hus- 
band's newspaper, she began to be aware of the frequent 
items in the social notes column, which Grace prepared, 
which did not seem to ring true. Alice and Chichi began 
comparing notes, with Alice confiding her fear that Doug 
might be involved in something. Grace, in the meantime, j 
it seemed to both Chichi and Alice, had become over-i 
friendly — almost as if she were trying to placate Alice, 3 



56 





^jtronge news items — keeps Doug working suspiciously late 



6. Unknown to the happy group which has befriended 
her, Grace has been keeping in touch — by phone and 
through her "sociol column" — with o man named Ted. 



I 



reassure Chichi that nothing could be UTong. ... As 
events transpired, the suspicions of Chichi and AUce had 
firm foundation. Grace Garcine's real name was Marie 
Holmes and she had changed it for very good and suffi- 
cient reasons. She had had to, in order to hide. About a 
week before Grace walked into the lives of the Papa 
David circle, she had found herself in a terrible entangle- 
ment. For some time she had been in love with Ted 
Bowman, young, eager to inake money, and a person of 
not too much backbone. He'd chosen the easy but ques- 
tionable profession of bookmaking — on the fringes of the 
law, but certainly not a justifiable occupation. Grace had 
rationalized his involvement in her own mind by coming 
to the conclusion that, as soon as Ted made money enough, 
he would quit and get into a strictly legitimate business. 
. . . This, however, was not quite the way it turned out. 
Ted made enemies who didn't want him to "muscle in." 
He was with Grace when one of these competitors came 
to him and threatened him with a gun. In defending 
himself, the gun went off. The competitor was dead. Terri- 
fied, stunned over what had happened, the two had real- 
ized they were in great danger fi'om two angles — the 
police, and the gangsters who would want revenge for 
the death of their associate. Ted, alone, could lose himself. 
Grace, alone, must change her name, her appearance and 
personality, and hide. With Doug's newspaper, Grace has 
the perfect set-up. She can use the social notes column to 




7. Ted has a bad record — but Grace loves him. Whot 
is the secret they share? Where did she get that 
gun? And why does she hide it in Papa David's safe? 



57 



LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 




4. ur.-.vo.a cv the sordid undercurrents sweeping 
through their lives. Alice revels in the fenninine 
business of shopping, mending, and making a home. 



Chichi's mind — ^for anyone to follow her thoughts. She 
was contending that there were a vast number of women 
who loved men who are weak, characterless, but that 
nevertheless this did not necessarily make the woman in- 
volved less of a good human being. Doug, whose wife 
Alice sat next to him, was arguing that all this might be 
true — but it didn't make the woman any less "guilty" 
for hiding or defending such a weak character when a 
crime had been committed. . . . All four persons in the 
bookstore knew that they were arguing about Grace 
Garcine. Grace had entered their lives some months be- 
fore, when Alice had decided that she would retire from 



The cast, as pictured here, includes; 

Chichi Conrad Xeri Keane 

Papa David Ralph Locke 

Dotlg Norman George Petrie 

Alice Norman Elsie Hitj 

Grace Garcine Amzie Strickland 

Ted Terry O'SuUivan 

I'^""' Clifford Sales 

life Can Be Beautiful, NBC Radio, M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, for Tid 




5. But perhaps Grace is being too helpful? She writes 



her business partnership with Doug to assume her right- 
ful role as his wife. Chichi had suggested, when Alice 
came to this decision, that Doug hire someone to help 
in the newspaper office. Grace had applied for the joo 
and Doug and Alice had gratefully accepted her aPP'!'=?' 
tion. She was a speedy typist, very alert, with a slig" 
_i . .1 ,. . _...,,_! u»«r^gneu 



,,.wi. ,jiic weii a speeay rypisi, very axeii., vy*". j 

knowledge of newspaper work. . . . Little had happenc 
those first few weeks— litUe that was out of the ordinary, 
that is. Grace had taken a room in Mrs. Schwartzs Mt, 



those first few weeks— litUe that was out of the ordinary, 
that is. Grace had taken a room in Mrs. Schwartzs Mt, 
joined Rev. Dr. Chandler's choir, and helped Fatne 



McGary at the Settlement House. Alice had been veff 
happy about the arrangement, for it gave her time to 
up the flat, mend Doug's clothes, prepare meals for iJ°J^ 
which he could relax over and enjoy when he «""* ., juj 
tired from the newspaper office. ... It wasn't f^^^^g 
mcident of the gun that Alice became concerned, i^ 
began noticing the number of times when Doug "^^.L, 
now because he had to be with Grace during her W^" j 
period. She noticed Grace's rather obviously D^°'"r^. 
hair but— more significanUy— when she read her j 
bands newspaper, she began to be aware of the "'^ j, 
Items in the social notes column, which Grace PJ'.^P" j„ 
which did not seem to ring true. Alice and Chich' ^^^g 
comparmg notes, with Alice confiding her fear that J^ ^ 
might be involved in something. Grace, in the "lea'""^^. 
^seemed to both Chichi and Alice, had become o 
Jriendly-almost as if she were trying to placate ^ 



56 



'♦ronge news items — keeps Doug working suspiciously late. 



reassure Chichi that nothing could be wrong. ... As 
events transpired, the suspicions of Chichi and Alice had 
hrm foundation. Grace Garcine's real name was Marie 
Holmes and she had changed it for very good and suffi- 
cient rea.sons. She had had to, in order to hide. About a 
week before Grace walked into the lives of the Papa 
"avid circle, she had found herself in a terrible entangle- 
ment. Foi- some time she had been in love with Ted 
owman, young, eager to make money, and a person of 
not too much backbone. He'd chosen the easy but ques- 
'onable pmfession of bookmaking— on the fringes of the 
aw, but certainly not a justifiable occupation. Grace had 
rationalized his involvement in her own mind by coming 
the conclusion that, as soon as Ted made money enough, 
^ 'J?"''' y"'t and get into a strictly legitimate business. 
T d iiowever, was not quite the way it turned out. 

ed made inemies who didn't want him to "muscle in." 
to^h^*^ ^^''"' "^race when one of these competitors came 
him it "^"^ thi-eafened him with a gun. In defending 
fied ''^^ '^"" ^^"* °'^- "^^^ competitor was dead. Terri- 
ized !l"""'^ °^^'' what had happened, the two had real- 
Pol' '''"^^^ "^ Sreat danger from two. angles— the 
the'^*' ""'' *'*^ gangsters who would want revenge for 
Gra "^ "' ^^^"' associate. Ted, alone, could lose himself. 
Per ''^' ''''^"''' "^"^* change her name, her appearance and 
the f '^'' ^""^ ^^^- ^'* Doug's newspaper, Grace has 
Perfect sot-up. She can use the social notes column to 




6. Unknown to the happy group which has befriended 
her, Grace has been keeping in touch — by phone and 
through her "social column" — with a mon nomed Ted. 




7. Ted has a bad record— but Grace loves him. What 
is the secret they share? Where did she get that 
gun? And why does she hide it in Papa Dovid's safe? _ 



LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 



convey information to Ted, she is not in danger of being 
discovered by anyone while employed there. ... In spite 
of all precautions, the police finally catch up with Ted — 
and Ted, to save his own skin, claims Grace shot the 
bookmaker. Grace had guessed that this might happen 
and, to save herself, she had kept the murder weapon — 
the gun Alice had heard about — ^which stUl had on it the 
dead man's finger prints and Ted's — ^but not hers. ... In 
the bookstore, Chichi defended Grace's fight for the man 



she loved. "There must be great agony in a woman who 
loves a man she knows she cannot trust," Chichi said 
earnestly to Doug. "Ted is a weak character, I'll grant 
you, but Grace had to stick up for him, her heart dictated 
and wouldn't let her act otherwise" Doug shook his head 
firmly. "No," he said slowly. "To condone, to put up with 
weakness in a man, just because you love him, is to be 
guilty of an offense against society — and, ^as importantly, 
against yourself. Ultimately your own dignity, your own 



8. Knowing little, but suspecting much — Alice and Papa David and Chichi plead with Grace not to keep a 
dangerous secret. Grace knows Ted has killed a man and she cannot trust him, but still she keeps silent. 




9» Suddenly, the whole tragic story is reveoled. Alice 
and Danny look up in annazement as the police bring Ted 
into the quiet little bookstore — but Grace's face is a 
mask as she pretends not to recognize the man she loves. 



10. Ted, however, is anything but grateful for Grace's 
long-suffering silence. He believes that she has betrayed 
him, and denounces her bitterly. This is her only reward 
for all her misguided efforts to protect and shield him. 



character is destroyed." Chichi grinned and turned to 
Papa David. "What do you think, Papa David?" she 
asked. ... '1 think, Chichi," Papa David replied with a 
sigh, "that you think like a woman — with your heart — 
and Doug like a man — with his head. You are both a 
little right, both a little wrong. And, because there is a 
mixture of a little right and a little wrong in each of us, 
the world goes along in a Uttle lopsided fashion." Doug 
tucked Alice's hand under his arm and bent across to 
whisper in her ear. "At least one man gained out of all 
this — I have the perfect wife." Aloud, he added to Chichi 
and Papa David, "Alice and I are going to call it a day — 
because we're two people who know that, the world being 
lopsided or not, life can be beautiful!" 




kJi^^^^^^^r 


K^^^^^^H 




W^^^^^^H 




/ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


^^^^k: ^^F 




^r^y<M 


^m 




1 : ' 1 


^m J 


J] 




Big night: Joey's mother, Mrs. Edward 
Walsh, helps Joey preen for the P.C.S. prom. 



Calling for his date: Joey greets pretty 

Pat O'Neill and proudly presents his corsage. 



TEENS are a time to learn 




Joey Walsh is a success at 

fifteen — but he's 

still eagerly seeking answers 

to life's problems 

By ELIZABETH BALL 




Playtime at Professional Children's School usually 
means baseball — Kevin Matthews "chooses up" with Joey 



There's a boy on television by the name of 
Joey Walsh. He's pretty tall, has slanting 
eyes — and the ability to portray almost 
any type of teenager. Joey also plays in the 
movies. In "The Juggler," Joey played the 
part of Yehoshua, the Israeli youth who 
befriended Kirk Douglas. In "Hans Christian 
Andersen," Joey was Danny Kaye's sidekick. 

As a small boy, asked what he wanted to 
be when he grew up, Joey said, "A fighter." 
When his dad frowned on this aspiration, 
saying, "It's a little too rugged," Joey oblig- 
ingly changed his tune and thereafter, if asked 
what he wanted to be when he grew up, 
said, "An actor." This was the beginning 
of Joey-the-actor's story. 
Joey's dad is a (Continued on page 95) 



60 




Meeting the family: Pat introduces Joey to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
O'Neill, who say (but naturally), "Have fun, now — but don't stay out too late." 

Having wonderful time: At the Hotel Plaza, Joey and Pot dance "a little jitterbug — sdmba — 
Charleston — Waltz." It's dreamy, and pretty terrific, being fifteen. and learning your way around! 

















|-*il 



it J' 



■ 



y 



Ellen's a record-breaker — as a dramatic actress on stage, radio, TV! 




Ellen Demming is Meta, 

whose problems she 

shares, whose triumphs 

she appreciates 



META'S Guiding Light 



By FRANCES KISH 



It's a lucky girl who can claim Meta 
Roberts for a mother — lovely, 
imderstanding Meta of The 
Gxiiding Light. Kathy, Meta's step- 
daughter in the dramatic serial, is oidy 
beginning to realize that fact. But 
tiiere's a lively little youngster who 
fuUy appreciates her own good luck, 
even though she's only three years 
old. Her name is Erica, and her 
really-truly mother is Ellen Demming, 
who plays Meta on both radio and TV. 

Young as she is, golden-haired 
Erica knows all the Gviiding Light 
people by name, and sometimes talks 
to them, but she's learned not to be 
surprised when they don't answer her 
from the screen or radio. Erica knows 
she has two wonderful mamas and 
loves them {Continued on page 96) 



The Guiding Light— CBS-TV, M-F, 12:45 P.M. 
EDT— CBS Radio, M-F, 1:45 P.M. EDT— for 
Duz, Ivory Soap, Ivory Flakes, and Crisco. 




Two reasons she loves playing Meta: She can get home early to 
be with her own husband, Hal Thompson, and their little girl. Erica. 



63 



Belief in the future must see 

the Reverend Dennis through to a 



BRIGHTER 

DAY 



THE FAITH that has inspired Reverend Dennis through the years 
is being tested almost beyond human endurance as he tries 
desperately to bring some sort of order out of the chaos which 
engulfs the town of Three Rivers. The citizens of the town are 
divided, one against the other. The Mid-States Power company is 
building a dam which will eventually spell doom to the town. 
Tempers run high, as many of the townspeople argue that they should 
stay and fight the power company — and others argue that the law 
is on the side of the power company. . . . Perhaps all of this could 
have been viewed by the Reverend Dennis with a calm and detached 
attitude, had it not been that his daughter Patsy had fallen in love 
with Alan Butler. The Reverend Dennis is convinced that Alan is a 
nice young fellow — but, in the course of events, Alan has become 
involved with Roy Wilmot, a most undesirable character. 
Heightening the tension between the power company and the 
townspeople, one terrible night, town druggist Elmer Davidson is 
murdered and the finger of suspicion points so strongly at Alan 
that Alan himself is convinced he must have killed the old man while 
in a drunken stupor. . . . The Reverend Dennis firmly believes that 
a man cannot commit a crime, even under such horrible circum- 
-stances, unless he is a criminal at heart — and this he will never 
believe is Alan's nature. Patsy shares her father's complete conviction. 
The townspeople, however — angry, unhappy, unsettled — need a 
victim as revenge for Davidson's death, and Alan is their choice. 
With all the strength of character he can muster, Reverend 
Dennis bravely faces tomorrow and the townspeople's wrath, 
confidently holding on to the principles that have always governed 
his life. With his faith in the Lord, his belief in the future, Reverend 
Dennis will stand firm beside Alan and Patsy in their fight for justice. 



The Brighter Day, CBS Radio, M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, for Cheer. As pictured here. 
Bill Smith plays Reverend Dennis; Mary K. Wells, Patsy; Phillip Pine, Alan. 



What hope can Patsy and her 

father offer— when Alan doubts himself? 



64 



I 






t> 



i 



■3k- 



T 




^1 





Bruce fans the flames wi+h an old-fashioned bellows while Dan roasts a lonesome wiener. 

OUR MUTUAL FRIENDS 




Uncle Bruce, the children, Priscillo and Dan lunch "quietly" in the patio. 



SATURDAY aftemoon at the McCul- 
loughs' is something of an expe- 
rience for the casual visitor. As 
the door of the little brownstone 
house in New York's Greenwich 
Village opens, three very small chil- 
dren hurl themselves • at you with 
complete abandon. Their mother, 
Mrs. Dan McCullough, stands back 
looking sUghtly confused for a mo- 
ment, but soon an impish grin appears 
and the children are scooped up so 
that the visitor can get past the door. 
The room you enter is double size — 
dominated by two -huge fireplaces. 
The furniture has a well-worn look 
of comfort. People live here — that's 
obvious. And they live with the least 
possible formality— from the children 
in their overalls to Priscilla and Dan 
in blue jeans. 

Just as you settle back on one of 
the lovely old pine chairs, footsteps 
thunder down the staircase and in 
buzz Dan McCullough and his dee- 
jay partner, Bruce Eliot. It seems 
the two don't see enough of each 



Bruce Eliot and Dan McCullough 
spend Saturdays together, too 





The McCullough twins — Sarah and 
Kote — perch on Priscilla's ' lop. 



Dan (left) and Bruce (right) give Tommy odvice on parlor driving. 



other all week long on the Bruce And 
Dan record show over Mutual, and 
their local morning Tello Test pro- 
gram. So, on Saturday, Priscilla not 
only has to contend with her three 
lively youngsters, but with Bruce 
and Dan, as well. She claims that 
it's amazing how either of them sur- 
vived until they teamed up — they 
seem to need each other so much 
now. Bruce is a bachelor, and likes 
to get a taste of family life at Dan's. 

Actually, the boys explain their 
friendship very well themselves. "We 
sort of complement each other," says 
Bruce. "I'm a pretty outspoken guy, 
while Dan is more resei'ved and 
thoughtful." Together they make 
music. Working as closely as they 
do, the boys sort of anticipate each 
other's reactions. That accounts for 
the completely ad lib job they do on 
their four o'clock record show, dur- 
ing which they chatter between discs 
and interview musical personalities. 

When the visitor starts asking 
questions about the lovely house, 



with its brick kitchen complete with 
open hearth, and the early-American 
dining room, which is stocked with 
genuine antiques — oddly enough, 
Bruce will be just as ready to tell 
you all about it as Dan or Priscilla. 
He brags about Dan's horse sense in 
selecting the house and in buying the 
furniture. That's a story in itself. 
Seems Dan once met an old man in 
Mai-yland, who told him all about 
old furniture. One day he received 
a letter from the venerable oldster 
telling him of an entire houseful of 
furniture which was up for sale. 
Dan ordered the whole lot sent up to 
New Yox-k by truck without ever 
having seen it. Priscilla was skep- 
tical but, when she saw the wonder- 
ful old pieces, she decided Dan must 
be the smartest husband in the 
world. "The moving men thought it 
was just a bunch of old junk," laughs 
Priscilla, "thought we were crazy to 
be bothering with it." 

Saturday lunch is served in the 
patio outside. This is a hectic affair 



with Bruce, Dan and the children 
whooping it up with all sorts of she- 
nanigans. The patio is flagstone with 
little New York weed-trees shading 
it from the sun. After lunch, the 
boys usually get out the puff balls 
and take practice shots to improve 
their golf. Tommy gets into the act, 
too, if he can worm his way in. Then, 
Uncle Bruce decides to go home, 
and there is a general panic of good- 
byes, and Tommy's begging him and 
any other outsiders to please stay 
with them for good. 

Once outside the McCullough 
house — you can hardly believe that 
you've been visiting people who live 
right in the middle of the busiest 
city in the woi'ld. It just doesn't 
seem possible that in three more 
blocks the subway roars. You feel 
like taking Tommy's advice and 
staying there for good. 



The Bruce And Dan Show is heard at 4 P.M. 
EDT, Monday-Friday, on Mutual network. 



67 



Bert Parks — "Fm the Average Man" 



(Continued from page 51) 
install sets. So- what's the hurry?' 

"This I offer as practically positive 
proof that, to any man, I am Everyman, 
which is to say the average man. 

"Taking a backward look, the evidence, 
from the beginning, seems to prove that 
there is, in me, nothing of the stormy 
petrel. I did not become a star 'overnight.' 
My first job was in a local radio station 
in my home towm of Atlanta, Georgia. I 
earned seven dollars a week. In order to 
earn this stipend I ran errands and 'swept 
out,' in addition to doing most of the 
announcing. I continued to come up the 
slow and unspectacular way. The steady 
way, yes, but with no flash-bulbs (or head- 
lines) exploding; no bobby-soxers scream- 
ing as I climbed. 

"When I fell in love with Annette — a 
very pretty girl, but not in the profession — 
our romance wasn't 'written up.' We just 
got married as millions of other young 
Mr. and Mrs. Americans do, and set up 
housekeeping — also like millions of other 
young-marrieds — in a two-room flat in 
New York. The twins were born while we 
lived there. The babies and nurse slept in 
the bedroom; Annette and I in the living 
room. 

"We found our present home, as most 
average couples find their homes, by 
spending every weekend driving around 
the suburbs 'spotting,' as we called it. The 
instant we clapped eyes on our clapboard 
house, 'This,' I said, 'is for us!' 

"Whether making snap decisions is, or is 
not, characteristic of the average man, I 
don't know, but I," Bert said, "make them. 
Always have. And they are almost in- 
variably correct. I knew right away, for 
the most important instance, about An- 
nette. Yes, love-at-first-sight is what I 
mean. 

"Ever since I was a boy, I've made snap 
decisions, played hunches and, when I do, 
I always," Bert laughed, "Break The 
Bank! When I was a boy at home in 
Atlanta — back in 1931 or '32, this was — my 
mother planned to take my brother and 
me to the Chicago World's Fair. This was 
a great opportunity. I spent weeks think- 
ing I couldn't wait another day when, 
flash, at the last minute I asked Mother 
if, instead of taking me to the Fair, she'd 
give me the money it would cost so that 
I could go to New York and try my luck 
on radio. Mother gave me the money. I 
came to New York, auditioned, and got 
a job as steiff announcer on CBS! 

"Another time I played a hunch, I was 
emcee on the Vaughn Monroe show when 
an agency came to me with an offer to 
emcee a new show. Stop The Music. Now, 
I had a contract with the Monroe outfit. 
If I accepted the new and, as yet, untried 
program, it would have to be on a sus- 
taining basis at first. Yet my first impulse 
was to make the change. I made it — and 
the show ran for six years! 

"Same, in a way, with our home here 
out-of-town — we were warned against it. 
'Built of post-war materials,' friends cau- 
tioned us, 'green lumber, you know. Any 
moment, the walls will warp, the roof will 
leak.' Again I obeyed my first impulse, 
played my hunch that this was home, our 
home, and — we've lived in the house, with- 
out warp or leak, for six years! 

"Hunches apart, we lead a very average 
kind .of existence, that's for sure, in Su- 
burbia. By 'average' I mean we do all the 
things most folks do and very few they 
^ don't do. Our boys go to the public school 
in the town, play with the neighborhood 
•• kids and belong to the local Boys' Club, 
and our schedule, Annette's and mine, 
could be duplicated — bet you double or 
68 



nothing — by just about every other subur- 
ban family in these United States. On 
days when I'm working in New York, I 
usually drive in — do my show, Double Or 
Nothing — by late afternoon, I'm home 
again. When I get home there are many 
things, as Mr. Suburbia knows, to be done: 
We have about an acre of land and — al- 
though I have an expert come in once, 
sometimes twice, a year to sort of lay 
things out for me — the daily chores, like 
outside work, are mine, all mine! Plant- 
ing in the spring, you know. In the sum- 
mer, weeding what you've planted in the 
spring. Doing battle with insect life. Rak- 
ing leaves in autumn. Shovelling snow 
in mid-winter. Or there are screens to 
take down or put up. Or the dinghy to be 
painted. Or the grass to be cut. Monday 
evenings, the chores done, Annette and I 
may go to a movie. Or stay at home and 
watch TV, as we do a lot. . . . Dragnet 
being one of my pet programs. Hate to 
miss it. 

"On my days off, I always like to 
get up slowly; probably wouldn't get up 
at all, except that I'm usually awakened 
by my little Annette, now four. There's a 
kind of special set-up and atmosphere," 
Bert said, with a special expression in his 
dark expressive eyes, "about a little girl. 
She's very feminine, our little girl — pudgy 
and squeezy. Still got that baby fat, you 
know. At the same time, she's such a 
diminutive little thing and dainty — even 
though, living among boys as she does, it's 
difficult to dress her in anything but blue- 
jeans. When she has her way with her 
mother and wears the jeans, she asks 
hopefully: 'Now, Mama, will I turn into 
a boy?' 

"Once a week, when I'm awake and the 
spark of life ignites, I usually take the 
kids downtown for haircuts; spend the rest 
of the day doing odd chores. 

"Then, one day a week, of course, 
Annette and I take care of the children 
all day long. It's cook's day off, so I 
usually cook dinner. I'm dowmstairs stir- 
ring the pot while Annette is upstairs 
hearing prayers and tucking in — and I bet 
you there are mimeographed copies of this 
family scene in homes all over the U.S.!" 
Charcoal-broiled steaks are, Bert admitted, 
the family fare for lunch, likewise dinner, 
when it's his day "on." 

"One night's our night in town, An- 
nette's and mine. We go to the theatre. 
Or we just have dinner and talk. Or we 
have dinner with friends and talk. Bobby 
Sherwood and his wife are good friends 
of ours and we often make a foursome. 

"Weekends we do all the things we've 

done during the week only more of 

them, and more intensively. Once in a 
while, Annette and I spend a weekend in 
the home of friends. But that's only once 
in a very long while! 

"Couldn't be more average, now could 
it?" Bert asked. "Sounds dull, doesn't it? 
Only it isn't. Not to me, it isn't. I care 
too much about Annette and the kids; I'm 
too interested in them as people — and not 
just because they're my people — to find 
even a dull minute when we're together. 



It's a date! 

SEPTEMBER 

RADIO-TV MIRROR 

on sale August 7 



"It's also very average, I'm sure — in fact, 
one of the ways the average man proves 
he's average is to go about telling people 
how above-average his children are! I am 
— as I'm trying to prove — no exception. I 
carry my kids' pictures around in my 
wallet. I repeat their 'bright sayings' to 
anyone who looks even moderately recep- 
tive. Which reminds me to tell you about 
the day I tried to find a clue to what 
Annette would like to be when she grows 
up. The day I chose to use the technique 
of the quizmaster on my youngest, she was 
all dressed up — a white crispy thing, all 
ruffles and ribbons and curls — but when, 
to this dainty doll, I put the question: 
'What do you think you want to be when 
you grow up? the prompt reply was: 'I 
know what I want to be — a garbage man!' 

"I am certain," Bert laughed, "that 
things will change between now and the 
time she matriculates into womanhood! 

"The boys — twins Joel and Jeffrey, age 
seven — ^will sing and dance and perform 
at the drop of a hat. Joel's done some 
songwriting, too — his most recent is 
a really beautiful little ballad titled 
'There's Always a Key to Fit My Heart.' 
Even Irving Berlin wouldn't think poorly," 
Bert Parks said proudly, "of that title— or 
of the song. 

"Our girl is different from the boys in 
that she's a real performer at home, sings 
your ear off from dawn to dusk. When I 
have the kids on television with me — which 
I do, any show I'm on, every Christmas — 
Annette gets up there and not a word out 
of her. The minute the lights go on, she 
blots out! 

"I'd say that I'm like her — only in re- 
verse. I do have a few occupational faults," 
Bert says honestly, "such as a tendency to 
be impatient because of the pace of tele- 
vision, which is accelerated. The pace of 
normal life is not. Everything and every- 
one seems slow to me by comparison and 
I'm inclined to say to myself, 'Come on, 
hxirry up, get going!' 

"Also because of the pace TV requires 
of you and the necessity of being con- 
stantly alerted, I occasionally draw a blank, 
forget certain things that should be un- 
forgettable. One night last summer, the 
night of June eighth, to be exact, Annette 
and I were out with friends helping them 
celebrate their wedding armiversary, and — 
it turned out to he ours, too! I should 
have known," sighed Mr. Parks, "long be- 
fore I did, for Annette kept remarking the 
date to the other couple . . . 'June the 
eighth — fancy this being your anniversary,' 
she'd say, and 'Oh, really, it's a very 
special day — June the eighth, I mean.' 
Things like that. When, finally, the bomb 
burst in my brain, I turned all colors! 
No, I didn't go home the next night with 
the mink coat under my arm," Bert 
laughed, "or with anything at all. Too 
much like locking the barn after the horse 
is stolen, I figured. 

"Other than these lapses which might ! 
befall any man, whether in television or 
in the Pentagon, the mark of show busi- 
ness is not, I think, upon me. Perhaps to 
be the average man, even though you're in 
show business, is to consider your life as 
if your occupation is nothing unusual. I so 
consider it — because to be impressed with 
what you do is the quickest way to end 
a promising career! 

"It all," Bert said, expansively, "adds up, 
doesn't it, proves out, that I am the aver- 
age man?" ' 

I didn't answer. I didn't have the heart 
to. The answer to the one-and-only-of- 
his-kind Mr. Parks would have been a 
flat "No." 

What do you think? 



Hoagy Carmichael 

(Continued from page 38) 
The easygoing, wryly philosophical char- 
acter whom Hoagy essays is, he will tell 
you, '"the kind of guy people imagine I 
cun." 

Actually, he's pretty much the opposite 
— like "casual" Jack Benny, a chronic wor- 
rier. Weeks before the Saturday Night 
Revue debuted last June 6 from the big 
new NBC television plant in Burbank, near 
Hollywood. Hoag>' crossed off the days one 
by one with big black crosses, worrying a 
little harder every day about the new 
responsibilities he had assvmied. Could he 
hold an hour-and-a-half show together? 
Would it, at his "relaxed" pace, seem too 
slow? Would the comedians be funny? 
Would the vocalists sing flat? Could he 
find a writer who could write really funny 
sketches? (Sure, Sidney Miller, who can 
write funnier than almost anybody, already 
was signed up to direct the show — but Sid 
would have his hands full with the direc- 
tion.) 

Nobody else was worried, even about 
Hoagy's worrying — because, according to 
Joe Bigelow, producer of the show, "Hoagy 
is like that." 

Never having failed at anything in his 
life — including, incredibly, the law (the 
profession for which he was educated) — 
Hoagy nevertheless has been apprehensive 
about each new undertaking. He's worried 
through the years over his music — some of 
his fK)pular songs, notably "Stardust," "Old 
Rockin' Chair," "Laz>'bones," have been 
among the big hits of all time; "Cool, Cool, 
Cool of the Evening" won for him and 
Johnny Mercer the coveted Academy 
Oscar; his one foray into the symphonic 
field, a tone poem, "Brown County Au- 
tumn," was introduced by the Indianapolis 
Symphony in a successful concert at Car- 
negie Hall. He worried before he clicked 
big in the movies, and on the radio, in night 
clubs and big-time vaudeville. 

Truthfully, Hoagy was pretty much a 
dead cinch to grab yet another gold ring 
as a TV personality. (He had come off 
magnificently already in a series of TV 
guest shots.) 

But don't try to tell Hoagy that. 

When he is hitting his top stride as an 
entertainer (maybe to make him feel less 
guilty about having abandoned the "gentle- 
manly" profession his parents wanted for 
him), he is most likely to confide to you 
that he is "slipping"; living like a king, he 
is compelled to whisper that "believe it or 
not" — he is "broke." 

For the final weeks before Hoagy's debut 
day, he chose to do his worrying alone. 
His pretty wife, Ruthie, he dispatched to 
Palm Springs — at least she wouldn't have 
to worry about his worrying. The boys, 
Hoagy Bix, now fifteen, and Randy, 
thirteen, were in school at Chadwick. 
(Hoagy Bix, surprisingly — since he was 
named for his father's idol and early 
mentor. Bix Beiderbecke — has turned into 
the athlete of the family, plays pitcher 
on the Chadwick baseball team. Rgindy is a 
gifted pianist, "will have his own concert 
next spring — but no popular stuff, yet.") 

The Carmichaels' rambling, comfortable 
house, folded around an inviting swimming 
pool on its Bel Air hilltop, wore a surprised 
air of unaccustomed quiet as Hoagy got on 
with his worrying. 

Interviews, photographers' and other ap- 
pointments were squeezed in somehow, al- 
though "the schedule is pretty tight 
today." Actually, Aunt "Nosey" (Noreen 
MUbum), from Indiana, was bringing her 
grandson, Danny, over for the afternoon, 
and Hoagy had promised to teach Danny 
to swim. (You can always get a comer on 
Hoagy's crowded schedule if you're from 



exciting 

new 

pictures! 



SUSAN HAYWARD 



Off-Guard Candlds of Your 
Favorite Movie Stars 



•^ All the selective skill of our ace 
cameramen went into the making 
of these startling, 4x5, quality 
glossy prints. 




OORIS DAY 




•^ New poses and names are con- 
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tion up to date by ordering from 
the convenient list below. 



ROBERT WAGNER 



Circle the numbers of your choices and mail with coupon today. Send 
cash or money order. 12 pictures for $1; 6 for 50c. 



L. 
2. 
5. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
11. 



Lana Turnei 
Betty Grable 
Alan Ladd 
Gregory Peck 
Rita Hayworth 
Esther Williams 
Elizabeth Taylor 

14. Cornel Wilde 

15. Frank Sinatra 

18. Rory Calhoun 

19. Peter Lawford 

21. Bob Mitchum 

22. Burt Lancaster 

23. Bing Crosby 

24. Shirley Temple 

25. Dale Evans 
June Haver 
June Allyson 
Ronald Reagan 
Dana Andrews 

31. Glenn Ford 

33. Gene Autry 

34. Roy Rogers 

35. Sunset Carson 

36. Monte Hale 

46. Kathryn Grayson 
48. Gene Kelly 

50. Diana Lynn 

51. Doris Day 

52. Montgomery Clift 



25. 
27. 
29. 
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53. 


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108. 


vera-Ellen 


149. 


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54. 


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109. 


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150. 


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55. 


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110. 


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WORLD WIDE, Dept. WG-853 

63 Central Avenue, Ossining, N. Y. 

I enclose $ for candid pictures of my favorite stars and 

have circled the numbers of the ones you are to send me by return mail. 

Name 



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R 
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69 



Indiana and, if you're a relative, you're 
a cinch.) 

He was too busy to confer with his music 
publishers about his newest song, "Love 
Will Soon Be Here." ("A corny little song, 
might catch on if the kids like it," Hoagy 
shrugs, after casually singing it through 
at the little work piano in his study. Note: 
it will probably sell a million.) But he had 
a whole afternoon to "look over the little 
poems" with another aunt, Miss Florence 
Cai-michael, "the best Sunday school teach- 
er in the entire state of Indiana." 

He was too pressed to accept a night 
club date which would have paid him thou- 
sands, but had plenty of time to whiz up 
the coast to his favorite golf club at Ojai, 
share the piano bench — but for free! — for 
most of a gay, late night with the club's 
popular pianist. Bob Andrews. 

"You play the topside, man," Hoagy said, 
moving in, "I'll put in the oompahs." 
Everybody stopped dancing at once to 
listen to the mad music the combination 
was putting out. 

"That boy," Hoagy remarked about his 
erstwhile partner later, "sure plays a 
powerful lot of piano." 

And Ca'-michael? Just for the oompahs! 
And the laughs! Man, he almost forgets 
to worry when he gets to laughing. 

But he had to get on with it. 



His mother, Mrs. Lyda Carmichael — who, 
since Hoagy's father's death seven years 
ago, has lived near her son in a house he 
bought for her in Beverly Hills — took over 
as guide and hostess for the Indiana con- 
tingent. She believed Hoagy when he said 
he simply had to get down to work (i.e., 
worry). 

Most of his friends — the dozens and 
dozens of pals who ordinarily roam through 
the house and splash in and out of the pool 
at all hours of the day or night — had be- 
lieved him, too. So the phone gave up its 
incessant ringing. 

And then suddenly the big house — about 
as unlike the cramped little "apartment" 
which Hoagy, as TV star, inhabits for his 
hour and a half on Saturday evenings, 
as Hoagy is unlike "the guy people ima- 
gine" him to be — was unbearably lonely. 

The maid was there, but keeping con- 
siderately quiet somewhere off in the di- 
rection of the kitchen. Poagy, the black 
poodle, was there. But not real company. 
Poagy went right on sleeping even when 
Hoagy banged out the chorus of "Love Will 
Soon Be Here." 

This was getting on his nerves. He 
would have to call somebody up. 

Hoagy rang up Howard Ross, the man 
assigned to lining up talent for Saturday 
Night Revue. Mr. Ross was out. Joe Bige- 



low was out. Sidney Miller was out. Was a 
guy expected to worry alone? 

Even in a place where you'd expect to 
be lonely — say Cardiff, South Wales, where 
he had played last summer after a success- 
ful stand at London's famed Palladium — 
it was never as quiet as this. He remem- 
bered the nice family who had come 
around backstage after his performance in 
Cardiff. He had never seen them before, 
but they were friendly. 

"Come on home with us," they said, 
"we'll give you supper." Canned spaghetti 
and salted crackers, supper was — from 
America. They thought the American 
would like that. He did, too. 

But he wasn't in Cardiff, South Wales. He 
was at home in Bel Air, and lonesome. 
Too lonesome even to get his worrying 
done. So he'd do those seventy-five auto- 
graphs of "Stardust" he had promised the 
Senior class at St. Francis High School in 
Lafayette, Indiana. Indiana . . . school . . . 
it made him homesick. Homesick, at home, 
that vvas a laugh. 

He called the Chadwick School. The boys 
would be free for the weekend. 

"Tell them not to come home," he told 
the director. "There's nobody here. . . . 

"What I mean is," he adided, "I'll be 
picking them up. We're joining Mrs. Car- 
michael in Palm Springs." 



Lu Ann Simms — Little Miss Miracle 



(Continued from page 29) 
at the restaurant when she got there. She 
was a long way from home, and feeling 
frisky, so she approached the leader. "May 
I sing with you?" 

"Be my guest," said he. 

She sang, and a florist named Mike 
Risoli, one of the patrons of the place, 
heard her, and bells started ringing in his 
head. "You gotta go on Talent Scouts," 
he said. "In fact, you gotta let me take 
you. I'll pi-esent you. I'll discover you — " 

He was such a nice man, he was such 
an eager man, Lu Ann couldn't think of 
any reason to say no. "What can I lose? 
Let's do it." 

She had three auditions — the prelimi- 
nary ones, before you know if you're 
accepted to appear on Talent Scouts — in 
one week. Before each audition, she went 
to St. Patrick's and lit a candle. In the 
peace of the great cathedral, she lost her 
fears, came out refreshed. 

The third audition completed (the first 
had been for a lady named Esther Stone, 
the second for Esther Stone and some- 
body else, the third for the producer), Lu 
Ann went home to Rochester. One week 
. later, the phone rang. "We want you to 
appear next Monday night — " 

On April 21, 1952, Lu Ann — accom- 
panied to the studio by her mother, father, 
and Aunt Laura (from City Island) — ap- 
peared on Talent Scouts, and started the 
river of tears mentioned previously. 

She herself didn't stop bawling until ten- 
thirty that night, she was so excited. 

Thus did fame come to our heroine, who 
looks like a darker-haired Debbie Reyn- 
olds, with her horse's-tail hairdo, her 
"five-foot-almost-one" of height, her "100 
pounds right on the button" of weight. 

The day after she won the Talent 
Scouts contest, MGM Records phoned her. 
"We'll sign you Thursday, and you'll re- 
cord Friday — " 

She said, "I'll let you know." Then there 
was another call. Mitch Miller of Colum- 
bia on the wire. "Don't touch your finger 
to a fountain pen; we want you — " With 
H all due respect to MGM Records, if Co- 
^ lumbia Records wants you, you jump. 
Lu Ann's no different from anyone else; 
she jumped, signed, and is glad of it. 
70 



Percy Faith's done all the directing, so far, 
on her records, and she's one of his warm- 
est admirers. "I like pretty music. In 
my own collection, I've got mostly L.P.'s by 
people like Percy, David Rose, Paul Wes- 
ton — " 

She keeps these L.P.'s in an apartment 
she shares with a girl named Joanie 
Waterhouse — a receptionist up at the God- 
frey office. But that's getting ahead of the 
story. There'd have been no need for 
Lu Ann to take a New York apartment, if 
she'd just won Talent Scouts. Not that 
it doesn't generally lead to big things for 
the winners; just that, after all, there's a 
winner every single week, and Godfrey 
couldn't possibly make 'em all permanent 
"little Godfreys," members of his regular 
gang. He did, however, do just that with 
Lu Ann. She's been part of all the Godfrey 
shows for over a year now, working right 
along with Janette Davis, Marion Marlowe, 
Julius La Rosa, Frank Parker. 

CBS likes to refer to Lu Ann's as a 
"Cinderella story," and states in a pub- 
licity release that she "was wafted from 
obscurity to vocal stardom by Godfrey." 

Lu Ann's on their side, 100 per cent. 
Godfrey's her idol. She'd knit him an 
overcoat, bring him hot soup, give him 
her right arm. 

"Cinderella" Lu and Joanie Waterhouse 
furnished their three-and-a-half rooms 
themselves — "It's modern, but it's going 
to take a year to get it filled." And they've 
got a little patio — "We can crawl right 
through the kitchen window onto it." 

The girls claim the reason they get 
along so well is because "one's crazier 
than the other." But, called upon to give 
examples of their craziness, they can't 
think of any. Ask Lu Ann about boys, 
and she says, "We do have dates once 
in a while — " 

"We?" 

"Oh," she says, "Joanie and I do every- 
thing together." 

They even get up at 6 a.m. together — 
Lu Ann has to rehearse, and Joanie doesn't 
want her to feel bad because she, Joanie, 
doesn't have to rehearse. They even ruin 
dinner together. Take an instance a few 
weeks ago. Both girls were tired. "I'm 
going to go pick up some frozen food," 



Lu Ann said, setting forth. She came back 
with two chicken pies, put 'em in the 
oven, then went into the living room. 
Joanie was already settled down watching 
TV. Lu Ann joined her. They fell asleep. 
They were awakened later by a horrendous 
smell. 

"The house," said Joanie, "is burning 
down." 

"Dinner," said Lu Ann, "is burning up." 

They looked at each other. "I'm too 
tired to eat, anyway." 

"Me, too." 

They went into the kitchen, turned off 
the oven, drank a glass of milk apiece, and 
retired, quite happy. 

Speaking of happy, Lu Ann reached a 
kind of happiness in May, when her 
brother Sonny — he who now demands to 
be called John — came home from Korea. 
Everybody in the Godfrey outfit was so 
thrilled for the Ciminellis that, when Lu 
Ann finished the Wednesday-night show, 
she was given the next two days off so she 
could have a long weekend with her 
family. 

She rushed to her apartment, where 
Sonny and her mother were waiting 
(Sonny'd been in the Army seventeen 
months, and in Korea fifteen of those 
seventeen). And, after all the hugs and 
greetings and breathless exclamations and 
joyful tears, the three went to the Copa- 
cabana for Jimmy Durante's closing night. 

Sonny was impressed. "All this hap- 
pened to me since he went away," Lu Ann 
says, "and just being there, and sitting 
at ringside, and having people come up 
and ask for autographs, he got such a 
kick out of it — " 

Next morning, off to Rochester and a 
family reunion. Is the family big? "It's 
immense. I don't even know all my rela- 
tives," Lu Ann says simply. 

What she does know is every New 
York Yankee's batting average. (She and 
Julius La Rosa argue the respective merits 
of Yankees and Dodgers till older, tireder 
heads grow restive.) And she also knows 
when she's well off. To movie offers, offers 
to leave Godfrey, Lu Ann turns a deaf 
ear. "I'm so tickled now, doing what I'm 
doing; I'm so lucky, I'll just let natun 
take its course. . . ." 



I 



Arthur Godfrey 



(Continued from page 35) 

which were to correct a painful hip con- 
dition with which he has lived for the 
past twenty years. Mrs. Godfrey was 
there. Godfrey's personal physician. Dr. 
Thomas Jackson, was there. So were the 
orthooedic surgeons who were to perform 
the delicate operation which would re- 
place shattered bones with plastic ball- 
and-socket hip joints. The two operations 
were six weeks apart and, as we go to 
press, Arthur Godfrey faces nearly a year 
on crutches and then — "the Good Lord 
willing" — he will be able to walk free of 
pain, able once more to resume the fan- 
tastic pace which has characterized the 
man. For, with Arthur Godfrey, there is 
courage on many levels. 

Waiting for the bulletins in the hospital 
corridors, it was hard to realize that, just 
a few short weeks before, Arthur Godfrey 
was walking through the lobby of the 
Kenilworth Hotel in Bal Harbour, Florida, 
wearing the resolendent blues and gold 
braid of an Eastern Airlines captain. Then 
he was on his way to realizing more of his 
dreams, " more of his ambitions. 

Out past the hotel, in the Atlantic, the 
Coast Guard prowled the light blue waves 
to make sure no importunate fisherman or 
millionaire, in scow or yacht, approached 
the sacrosanct sands. And high above, pur- 
ring in the still Sunday morning air, an 
Air Force plane endlessly circled, in the 
event an old Jennv trailing a sign ad- 
vertising "Mike's Palace of Good Eats" 
should come stuttering along over the 
hotel, and maybe drop a wing or a motor 
into the pool. 

One such plane had recently plopped 
into the surf not far away a few weeks 
before, and Mr. Godfrey was taking no 
chances. 

Somewhere in the picture, but curiously 
subdued and even apologetic, as if over- 
powered at the privilege of crossing the 
lobby and visiting the rooms or cabanas 
for which they were paying a minimum 
of thirty-five dollars a day, the regular 
guests of the Kenilworth backed and 
edged their way around the Godfrey 
troupe. A Texas oil millionaire smiled 
weakly when a TV technician caught an 
elbow in the millionaire's ear, over a 
lunch table. "S'all right," the Texan mur- 
mured, and the technician hadn't the time 
to apologize. He was hustling a cable 
across the dining-room floor. 

A matron in a startling array of dia- 
monds diffidently remarked to a policemgin 
that she would appreciate it if her daugh- 
ter would be allowed through the lines in 
front. "The chauffeur called up from a 
service station and says they've been 
waiting an hour. . . ." 

(ji odfrey's voice, as he stopped to talk 
to us, sounded so much like Godfrey on 
the radio that people looked around to see 
who had turned on a set. He was on his 
way out to the airport to make (with Dick 
Merrill, senior Eastern pilot — and the man 
Toby Wing left the screen to marry) some 
more scenes for his documentary movie 
on flying safety. 

When, sometime later. Arthur walked 
out through the great slabs of crystal that 
serve as the Kenilworth front doors, he 
limped only perceptibly. Yet, everyone 
watching him winced a little with every 
step, knowing what they cost him. 

"Well!" said one of the women who had 
been watching from a couch in a corner 
of the lobby. "Mr. Eisenhower couldn't ask 
for more! What's the idea, anyhow?" 




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71 



woman, "it's something you must just get 
used to. Television, you know. . . ." 

Not quite. There was drama here. What 
was going on before those two women 
was the build-up to an eight-day-long 
show that represented, on Godfrey's part, 
a remarkable amount of courage. In spite 
of what he faced three weeks later, God- 
frey was quietly carrying on with three 
projects dear to his heart. 

He was finishing the documentary film, 
to be shown on television and in films dis- 
tributed to service clubs around the 
country, backing safety in flying. 

He was going to try again to beat the 
sonic barrier himself, alone, in his own 
plane. 

And he was thoroughly, carefully, at 
great personal expense, realizing his dream 
of pioneering a new television winter spot 
in Miami from which national radio and 
TV simulcasts such as his could originate 
whenever the rugged New York winters 
grew too rough, too unbearable. 

"It's been a long-time dream," Arthur 
told us. "For years, winter after winter. 
I've been coming down here. Snow and 
ice at home in New York and Washington, 
then a four-hour plane ride, and this." 
He didn't have to nod to the waving palms, 
the bright sun glinting from their fronds, 
outside. "I've always thought how swell it 
would be for the staffs of big shows if we 
could move down here once in a while — 
maybe from fall to spring. Well, this is the 
first try, the foot in the door. If it works, 
who knows?" 

When Arthur talked on that beautiful 
April day, he said, easily, that "by this 
time next year I should be through with 
the crutches. The guy who's going to do 
the operation has had only twelve failures 
— that's one chance in a hundred." 

In character, Godfrey was talking casu- 
ally, as if his operations were another 
show, or another documentary, or another 
spinning of a record on a dawn disc- jockey 
program. 

But those of us who've known the story 
for a long time recalled the facts. 

There had been a motor accident twenty- 
two years before, in 1931, when the man- 
gled body of Arthur Godfrey was brought 
carefully into a hospital, and patched up 
as well as might be. 

There had been forty-seven fractures in 
and around the pelvic region, and the 
surgeons who attended him had shaken 
their heads and remarked that he prob- 
ably wouldn't live. 

Arthur overheard them. He might have 
been conditioned to ham it up a little 
about most things, even then, but this was 
bigger than that. He played it straight. 

He said to himself, "Nothing's impos- 
sible." 

Nothing ever had been, so far. If he 
could beat this one, he could beat any- 
thing. 

"Nothing's impossible. Nothing — " 

Arthur Godfrey beat that twist of fate. 
He lived And, afterward, somehow he 
seemed to beat every one that followed, 
every obstacle, every stop that presented 
itself. Until he was on top. Until there was 
no longer any way to count the people who 
listened to him and loved him, who saw 
and loved, who bought the products he 
advertised. Even when he panned the 
products, they bought them. They told 
their friends. Week and month and year 
after year, more dials were turned to him. 
More TV sets, as they were installed every- 
where, caught his show. 

And the millions of dollars poured in, 

and went out again in production costs, 

R in salaries. A good share went into God- 

H frey's private coffers, where they belonged, 

because this is a country where you can 

still make a fortune, if you earn it. 

72 



Arthur Godfrey earned it. Nobody ever 
worked harder. 

Arthur, who is playing with such danger- 
ous toys as the sonic barrier, told us — 
with his famous grin working nicely — 
that he thought his operation was on a 
par with walking across the street, so far 
as the danger is concerned. 

Making a pass at the sonic barrier, which 
he planned to try in a two -seat Navy In- 
terceptor, wouldn't be much riskier, he 
said. "It's no trick. You just climb to 45,- 
000 feet, throw it into a dive to 32,000 feet 
and somewhere in between you pass 
through it. They do it every day." 

As a Naval Reserve lieutenant com- 
mander, he once, some time ago, made a 
stab at going through the barrier, but the 
ship he was flying just wasn't built for it. 
"When I felt it start to buckle under, I 
backed out of there in a hurry." 

There are degrees of courage. . . . 

There are also a lot of reasons why it 
took courage for Arthur to follow through 
on his plans to bring his show to Miami 
for a week. Since the expense was the 
least of those reasons, I'll mention it first. 

The production cost of the shows was 
two million dollars, of which Godfrey 
paid $42,000 out of his own pocket. That's 
a lot of money to spend in one week, even 
when you're sure of what you're getting. 

In this case, the whole production was 
not only an experiment — it was a monu- 
mental departure that would in some 
measure affect the whole future of tele- 
vision and in a very real sense affect the 
future of two entire cities — Miami and 
Miami Beach — and of tens of thousands 
of people. Because, by this one decision, 
Godfrey was opening south Florida as a 
rival to Hollywood. Partly through his 
efforts, the coaxial cable was made revers- 
ible and guaranteed. 

From now on, network shows can origi- 
nate in Miami whenever a major star de- 
cides it's a good idea. 

This means that such people as Godfrey, 
Imogene Coca, Durante and dozens of 
other top names can move to Miami, come 
autumn, and operate from there until 
spring. Lack of facilities, and the distance 
involved, had kept them tied to New York 
or Hollywood before. 

Godfrey had heard every reason why 
his pet project couldn't work. What would 
be used for studio space? True, WTVJ 
has, one of the largest and most complete 
TV stages in the country, but that's occu- 
pied most of the time with local program- 
ming — and so how could rehearsals be 
held for really big shows? And then the 
telephone company wouldn't guarantee 
the cable, and it would cost a fortune to 
build all new stage settings in Miami, 
even more to transport the stuff all the 
way from New York to the tip of Florida, 
and besides and besides and besides. . . . 

Well, said the city fathers of Miami and 
Miami Beach — spurred on relentlessly by 
the merchants there — if you'll bring the 
shows, we'll guarantee the cable. How's 
that? 

It was about that time that Godfrey, 
during a short flying visit to the Kenil- 
worth, stared about him one day and a 
light brighter than the Florida sun snapped 
on in his brain. 

"Here's the set," he said, "and the stage 
— all of this. The lobby, the Emerald Room, 
the pool and cabana area. All it needs is 
lighting. All we'd have to bring down here 
would be the troupe, the technicians and 
some equipment. Instead of faking the 
scene, we can give TV audiences the real 
thing, move all this just as it is right into 
the living rooms of every TV family in 
America!" 

And that, to the astonishment of the 
doubters, and to the ecstatic glee of Greater 



Miami, is exactly what Godfrey did. 

On the first day of the week of programs 
originating from sunny Miami, while local 
publicists wrung their hands and looked 
about for suicide weapons, a sharp wind 
moved in from a couple of freak pressure 
fronts and it rained cats and dogs. Mut- 
tering deep in his throat, Godfrey moved 
the whole outfit inside, leaving lights and 
one camera trained on the pool and cabana 
area. During the evening Talent Scouts 
simulcast, he had the camera break in with 
a view of the pool and what should have 
been a gentle, moonlit sea beyond. 

The pool looked misty and cold, the sea 
was invisible, and the stately palms that 
generally murmur quietly looked a good 
deal more as if they were thrashing about 
in a brisk wind. A mike had been put on 
the beach to catch the soft whisper of the 
sea against the sand. It came through, all 
right. "Slap, crash!" it whispered. "Boom!" 
The picture hastily dissolved into the cozy 
warmth of the Emerald Room. 

Two million dollars' worth of invest- 
ment, the hopes and plans of months for 
both Godfrey and Miamians, hung in the 
balance. 

But you can't get a good climate down. 
The next morning the sun was 'shining, 
the palms murmured, the surf whispered, 
and the pool was motley with the color of 
pretty girls. Thereafter every show went 
off like clockwork, the Wednesday eve- 
ning water ballet was a thrilling light 
symphony, and by the end of the week not 
only had everyone had a terrific time^ 
but there was no doubt the experiment had 
succeeded beyond anyone's wildest dreams, 
even Godfrey's. 

Hank Meyers, public relations director 
for Miami Beach, sat happily snowed under 
by wires, letters and long distance phone 
calls — hundreds of each daily. With a kind 
of amazed reverence in his voice he told 
me, "It's just incredible. It's the most 
sensational promotion any city ever re- 
ceived at any time. It's as if the whole 
country had suddenly discovered Miami 
and the Beach. People are calling in want- 
ing us to name streets and parks and 
bridges after Godfrey. 

"The strange thing is, during this week 
of Godfrey shows the beaches and cabanas 
in front of the Beach hotels have been 
empty whenever Godfrey was on the air, 
and seats in front of the lobby TV sets 
were at a premium. Can you feature that? 
People saved their money and came all 
the way here for a vacation so they could 
lie on the beach in the sun, and instead 
all they wanted to do was sit inside and 
watch The Man on television! 

"What's even more important, from the 
inquiries that have been pouring in from 
big name shows on every radio and TV 
network, there's no doubt we're going to 
have our dream. In another two years, 
we're going to be one of the three great 
originating centers for radio and TV. It's 
going to change our whole economy down 
here." 

"And what about Arthur?" I asked. 
"What's his reaction to what he's done?" 

"Why," said Meyers, "he told me, 'I'm 
happy it worked.' " 

"Just like that?" 

"Just like that." 

Characteristically, Godfrey had accom- 
plished the impossible, opened up whole 
new fields and jobs and living habits for 
thousands of people in one fell swoop, 
changed the scope and the map of the 
1953-54 entertainment field, and then re- 
marked vaguely, "I'm happy it worked." 

And "the good Lord willing," in a few 
more months, Arthur Godfrey will be on 
his way once more to accomplishing new 
plans, new hopes, conquering new horizons. 
For, with Arthur, nothing's impossible! 



I 



Easy to Live With 



{Continued from page 49) 
star and a very pretty brunette. "It's just 
that buying is a hobby with him, his way 
of relaxing." 

The trouble is that Bill relaxes in a big 
way, and their apartment is apt to look 
like Christmas shopping season any time 
of the year. 

"Home was never like this," Carol says, 
"but a warehouse is." 

What meets the eye, in the Cullen five- 
room dwelling on Sutton Place, is a very 
handsomely appointed apartment. The 
living and dining rooms were decorated 
by Bill in Chinese modern. Carol had her 
way with the den and bedroom. These 
were furnished in French Provencal. But 
all nooks, crannies, mantelpieces, closets 
and other infinitesimal holes have been 
crammed with Bill's purchases. 

"Come into the dining-room closet," 
Carol says, "and at your own risk." 

This is a walk-in closet which Bill 
crawls into. Stored here is a mimeograph 
machine, material for water color and oil 
paintings, an easel, canvases, a huge pho- 
nograph that plays sixteen-inch trans- 
criptions. Bill's magic tricks are here, too. 
A magic cocktail shaker balanced precar- 
iously ready to fall on Bill's head. If he 
were to move the other way, he could be 
strangled by an assortment of trick scarves. 

Of course. Bill has a reason for every- 
thing. The art and magic paraphernalia 
were once hobbies of Bill's. The out-sized 
phonograph he uses to play back trans- 
criptions of his shows when he can get 
to it. And the mimeograph machine once 
had a function of its own when Bill ran 
an airline. 

In the clothes closets in the bedroom, 
wearing apparel has given way to two 
large cases that individually contain a 
saxophone and a guitar. 

"I faintly remember having some idea 
of mastering every instrument in an or- 
chestra," Bill says thoughtfully. "This 
was as far as I got." 

Another closet is loaded with airplane 
gadgets. "What, I don't know," Carol says, 
"but it's expensive." 

Recently, Bill bought a few thousand 
dollars' worth of photo equipment and 
Carol had to build an extra closet for 
the den. He has taken some fine pictures, 
with Carol modeling for many of the best. 

But, whatever Bill buys, there is method 
in his "madness." It's usually something 
that helps him escape from the radio 
business. And, while he's home, he insists 
on privacy and quiet. On weekdays, for 
example, the maid does not come in un- 
til after noon when Bill has left. On week- 
ends, she is also absent. Bill has the run of 
the apartment and loafs about barefooted 
wearing whatever suits his mood. 

His routine is well set. Mornings he is 
up between eight and nine. He drinks a 
pot of coffee while he goes through all 
the morning papers. He works the Times' 
crossword puzzle. (He bought fifteen dif- 
ferent kinds of dictionaries for this recent 
interest.) He answers the phone and lines 
up his appointments. Around noon he goes 
to a studio or business luncheon. Usually, 
he doesn't get through work until eleven 
at night. 

Bill's work schedule keeps him so busy 
that he and Carol manage dinner together 
only on weekends. He has about eleven 
meals a week in restaurants, and so he 
likes to eat home with Carol. 

Saturday night at the Cullens is the best 
night of the week. It's just about the only 
whole evening Carol and Bill have to- 
gether. And so they don't go out, and they 
don't invite anyone in. 



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73 



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R 

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Sunday morning Bill breaks his coffee 
routine to fill up with a hefty breakfast, 
but the front door remains barred to all 
until evening, when friends come in for 
dinner. Carol prepares all meals — unless 
Bill has a craving for spaghetti. 

"When he wants spaghetti, I just turn 
the kitchen over to him and get out of 
the way," she says. Carol keeps the cup- 
board stocked with necessary ingredients 
for such days when the call of the kitchen 
hits Bill. "Many times a seven-pound roast 
has found its way into the grinder to be- 
come meat balls." 

She says Bill is really easy to live with 
and very considerate. He never brings his 
worries home. As a matter of fact when 
Bill's airplane business made a forced 
landing, she was the last to know of the 
problem. 

Flying in no sense could be called simply 
a hobby of Bill's. He has 3600 hours of air 
time and a commercial license which puts 
him in the same class with professional 
pilots. 

Bill's interest in flying began during 
World War II. Lamed by polio as a young- 
ster, Bill was turned down by the armed 
services. He then took it upon himself to 
become a pilot so he could serve in the 
air patrol. 

In New York, Bill found a fellow en- 
thusiast in Arthur Godfrey and they flew 
many times together. Godfrey had a Ryan 
Navion at the time and Bill got one of 
his own. The plane was destined to change 
the social life of the CuUens, as Carol 
learned the very first week. 

One night Bill told Carol to get dressed 
up for dinner out. He had heard of a new 
restaurant that served a delicious Italian 
dinner. 

An hour or so later, Carol realized Bill 
was driving out of Manhattan toward the 
airport. She asked, suspiciously, "Where's 
the restaurant?" 

"In Boston," he said calmly. 

Bill remembers the day he first incor- 
porated his flying business. "I was sore 
because the lawyer's fee was $250," Bill 
says, and grins. "When it came to the day 
of reckoning, I found that I had lost $30,- 
000 on the business." 

At the present time Bill owns not even 
a model airplane, but it hasn't stopped his 
buying sprees. The trouble is that he can't 
make a simple purchase. Recently he went 
into a department store to buy some un- 
derwear. He came home with underwear 
— but enough of it for a platoon, and a 
bill for $143. 

He isn't even safe in a drugstore. He 
and Carol stopped in a neighborhood store 
to buy a quart of ice cream. Bill paused 
by the gadget counter, lingered over shav- 
ing toiletries, fancied a bottle of cologne 
for Carol, and stopped by the candy 
counter. Carol recalls the stuff filled two 
paper bags. She nudged him then, and 
Bill remembered. 

"Put a quart of chocolate ice cream in 
with that stuff," he told the clerk. 

"Sorry," came the answer, "we don't 
sell ice cream." 

And, when Bill buys, he buys for every- 
one. He frequently comes home with an 
armful of clothes for Carol. For his birth- 
day party, he insists that Carol buy gifts 
for everyone coming. Prior to Easter Sun- 
day, he stopped in a flower shop to get 
lilies for Carol, remembered a dozen 
friends and wound up spending $150. 

As a matter of fact, an hour after the 
lilies were delivered to Carol, the florist 
was back with a giant azalea bush. 

"Looked pretty," Bill explained. "I 
couldn't resist it." 

Only once has Bill forgotten an anni- 
versary. At the time he was in the midst 
of grounding the airline business and had 
a head full of unpleasant details. He came 



home one evening with his lawyer and 
found a bowl of rose buds on the coffee 
table. 

"Who sent these?" he asked. 

"Todd Russell," Carol said. "It's our 
anniversary." 

"No!" 

"Yes!" 

A week later Carol got her anniversary 
gift: a Mercury convertible. This time, 
however. Bill bought only one. 

At Christmas time Bill does most of the 
shopping. He and Carol give about a 
hundred gifts. He always buys more than 
he needs and also replenishes his own 
wardrobe at the time. 

"Anything I plan on buying him for 
Christmas," Carol says, "he buys for him- 
self." 

Prior to his recent birthday he was on 
a camera kick. Carol called the store and 
pleaded with the clerk, "Please don't sell 
him everything he wants. Save one thing 
for me to give him." 

Games they have by the boxful. Bill 
reasons that if they are good enough to 
give maybe he'd enjoy them. That's how 
he came by a lie detector. Unfortunately, 
the one he bought for himself doesn't 
work, but he has never returned it. 

"Anyway, who wants to prove that people 
lie," he says. "I'd rather own a broken 
lie detector which proves people are 
honest." 

Carol's big headache is the problem of 
finding storage space for all of Bill's ac- 
quisitions. 

"I'll say, 'Let's get rid of this,' and he 
says, 'Let's keep it just a little while 
longer.' " 

In four years of marriage, Carol's only 
victory has been the disposal of all maga- 
zines more than two years old. 

"Matter of fact, Bill saves his mail, too," 
she says. 

He doesn't like to open letters (unless 
they contain checks), so Carol lets mail 
accumulate on his desk for a week and 
then puts the batch in a paper bag. One 
closet is half -filled with unopened mail. 

"The only thing Bill doesn't save are 
press clippings." 

He subscribes to a clipping bureau which 
sends him any newspaper or magazine 
item that carries his name. He looks at 
them and throws them away. 

"I want to know what's going on but 
don't want to keep a scrapbook," he says. 
"The way I see it, if I'm more successful 
as time goes on, I won't want them. And, 
if I flop, the clippings will only make me 
feel bad." 

The chance of Bill's flopping is so re- 
mote it is ridiculous. The VIPs in the 
business expect Bill to be one of the big- 
gest names in radio and TV. And, if that 
means his pay will be delivered in two- 
ton trucks, it's a little frightening to think 
of what may happen. With a million bucks 
in loose change, Bill might really make 
headlines. 

"Of course, where would I put a dirig- 
ible?" Bill asks meditatively. "Although 
maybe I could buy the Brooklyn Bridge 
and moor it over the river." 

There is no cure for Bill's shopping 
malady. Carol knows this and merely 
keeps her fingers crossed when she sees 
the mood come over him. 

The other day he asked her to pick up 
a copy of Yachting Magazine. She did and 
noticed he was reading only the end pages. 
Carol glanced over his shoulder and saw 
advertisements of boats for sale — not row- 
boats or dinghys, but sloops and yachts 
and cruisers. 

"Well," she observed quietly, "here we 
go again." 

"I'm not serious about buying a boat." 

Carol crossed her fingers. ^ 

1 



I 



nside Radio 

AU Times Listed Are Eastern Daylight Time. 



Monday through Friday 



NBC 



MBS 



Morning Programs 

Local Program 



8:30 i Do You Remember? 
8:45 



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9:15 I 

9:30 Thy Neighbor's Voice 

9:45 lEv'ty Day 



10:00 
10:15 
10:25 
10:30 
10:45 



11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 



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John MacVane 
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Live Like A 

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11:55 Turn To A 

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House Party 


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3:55 It Happens 
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Bill Stern 
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Lc 


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Lowell Thomas 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


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Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Mr. Mystery 
Gabriel Heatter 
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Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 
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7:55 Les Griffith 
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8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


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Henry J. Taylor 
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9:05 1 

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9:45 


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10:00 
10:15 

10:30 
10:35 




Hollywcod Showcase 
Robert Ambruster. 

Music 
News, Clifton Utiey 
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Fi 

E 

El 
It 


ank Edwards 
ton Britt Show 

ddie Fisher 

:55 New& Singiser 


News Of Tomorrow 
Virgil Pinkley, News 

Edwin C. Hill 
10:35 Freedoms ngs 


Starlight Concert 

News, Robert Trout 
Cedric Adams 



I 



Tuesday 



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6:00 




Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & The News 


6:15 


Bill Stern 






You And The World 


6:30 








Curt Massey 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 


News Parade 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Beulah 


7:15 




Hazel Markel 


Elmer Davis 


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7:30 


News Of The World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Space Ranger 


Jo Stafford Show 


7:45 


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7:55 Titus Moody 


7:55 Les Griffith. 
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Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


Eddie Fisher 


That Hammer Guy 


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People Are Funny 


6:15 


Rosemary Clooney 




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8:30 


First Nighter 


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Paul Whiteman Teen 


Mr. & Mrs. North 


8:45 






Club 




9:00 


Barron And The Bee 


News, Bill Henry 


America's Town 


Johnny Dollar 


9:05 




The Search That 
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Meeting Of The Air 




9:30 


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21st Precinct 


9:45 






E. D. Canham, News 




10:00 


Two For The Money 


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Louella Parsons 


10:15 




The Valley Boys 


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Doris Day 


10:30 


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Bands For Bonds 


Edwin C. Hill 


Robert Trout, News 


10:35 


Stan Kenton ^Concert 


10:55 News, Singiser 


10:35 United Or Not 


Cedric Adams 



1 


Wednesday 


Evening Programs 


6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Bill Stern 
Three Star Extra 


Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & The News 
You And The World 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 


7:00 
7:15 
7-30 
7:45 


News Parade 

News Of The World 
One Man's Family 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Men's Corner 
Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 
Lone Ranger 

7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 


Beulah 
Junior Miss 
Jo Stafford Show 
Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 


Walk A Mile— Bill 

Cullen 
Great Gildersleeve 


Crime Files Ot 

Flamond 
Crime Fighters 


Mystery Theatre 
City Of Times Square 


FBI In Peace And 

War 
Dr. Christian 


9:00 
9:05 

9:30 


The Best Of Groucho 

Truth Or Conse- 
quences 


News, Bill Henry 
Family Theatre 

Off & On The Record 


Mr. President 
Crossfire 


Playhouse On Broad- 
way 
9:25 News 
What's My Line? 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:35 


Scarlet Pimpernel 

News, Clifton UtIey 
Summer Show 


Frank Edwards 
Elton Britt Show 

10:55 News, Singiser 


News Of Tomorrow 
Virgil Pinkley 
Edwin C. Hill 
10:35 Latin Quarter 
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Summer In St. Louis 

Robert Trout, News 
Cedric Adams 



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6:00 




Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & The News 


6:15 


Bill Stern 






You And The World 


6:30 








Curt Massey 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 


News Parade 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Beulah 


7:15 




Rukeyser Reports 


Elmer Davis 


Junior Miss 


7:30 


News Of The World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Space Ranger 


Jo Stafford Show 


7:45 


One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


7:55 Les Griffith, 
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Edward R. Murrow 


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Roy Rogers 


Official Detective 


Mike Malloy 


Meet Millie 


8:15 


8:25 News 








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Father Knows Best 


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turer 






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My Son, Jeep 


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Time Capsule 


On Stage 


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News Of Tomorrow 


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with Horace Heidt 


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Edwin C. Hill 


Robert Trout, News 


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10:55 News. Singiser 


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Cedric Adams 



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Jackson & The News 


6:15 


Bill Stern 






Dwight Cooke 


6:30 








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6:45 


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7:00 


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Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Beulah 


7:15 




Mr. Mystery 


Elmer Davis 


Junior Miss 


7:30 


News Ot The World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Lone Ranger 


Jo Stafford Show 


7:45 


One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 
7:55 Titus Moody 


7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 


Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


Eddie Fisher 


Movie Quiz 


Adventures Of 


Mr. Keen, Tracer Of 


8:15 


Rosemary Clooney 




Michael Shayne 


Lost Persons 


8:30 
8:45 


Summer Show 


True Or False 


Platterbrains 


Mr. Chameleon 


9:00 


Musical Sweepstakes 


News, Bill Henry 


Summer Show 


Music In The Air- 


9:05 




Great Day Show 




Donald Richards, 


9:30 


Bob & Ray 


0(f & On The Record 


Summer Show 


Alfredo Antonini 


9:45 






9:55 News 




10:00 


Music By Mantovani 


Frank Edwards 


Fights 


Capitol Cloakroom 


10:15 


Words In The Nigh. 


The Valley Boys 


Virgil Pinkley, News 




10:30 


News, Clifton UtIey 


Dance Orchestra 


News Of Tomorrow 


Robert Trout, News 


10:35 


Bob McKenzie 


10:55 News. Singiser 


10:55 Edwin C. Hill 


Cedric Adams 



R 

M 

75 



w 



76 



I 



nside Radio 



Saturday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Programs 



8:30 
8:45 


Howdy Doody 


Local Program 


News Summary 


Renfro Valley 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Farming Business 
Mind Your Manners 




No School Today 


News Of America 
Robert Q. Lewis 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 

10:45 


Archie Andrews 

Mary Lee Taylor 
Show 


Local Program 

Frank Singiser, 

News 
Helen Hall 


No School Today 
Space Patrol 


Galen Drake 
Let's Pretend 


11:00 

11:15 

11:30 
11:45 


My Secret Story 
Modern Romance 


Coast Guard 

11:25 Holland Engle, 
News 

Farm News Con- 
ference 


Little League Club- 
house 


News, Bill Shadel 
11:05 Grand Central 
Station 

Give And Take 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 
12:15 
12:30 
12:45 


News 

Coffee In Wash- 
ington 


Man On The Farm 
Fifth Army Band 


101 Ranch Boys 
American Farmer 


Theatre Of Today 

Stars Over Holly- 
wood 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 


National Farm And 

Home Hour 
U.S. Army Band 


Music 

Game Of The Day 

Ruby Mercer 


Navy Hour 

Shake The Maracas 


Fun For All 

City Hospital 
1:55 Galen Drake 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


Design For Listening 


2:25 Headline News 
Georgia Crackers 


Late News 
Playland, U.S.A. 


Music With The Girls 

Make Way For 
Youth 


3:00 

3:15 

3:30 
3:45 


Marine Hall Of 
Bands 


Bandstand, U.S.A. 
3:25 Headline News 
Sports Parade 


Late News 

Martha Lou Harp 
Show 


Report From Over- 
seas 

Adventures In 
Science 

Farm News 

Correspondents' 
Scratchpad 


4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


Stars In Action 

All-star Parade Of 
Bands j 


U.S. Army Band 
College Choirs 


Horse Racing 
Treasury Show 


Eddie Fisher 
Treasury Bandstand 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Big City Serenade 

Arthur Speaks 
Key To Healtn 


Preston's Show Shop 
5:55 H. R. Baukhage 


London Studio 

Concerts 
Paulena Carter, 

Pianist 


Washington, U.S.A. 
At The Chase 



Eve 

6:00 
6:15 
6:30 

6:45 


ning Progra 

George Hicks 

News, Cassidy 

NBC Summer 
Symphony, Milton 
Katims Conducting 


ms 

Dance Orch. 
Country Editor 
Preston Sellers 


Una Mae Carlisle 
Bible Messages 
Harry Wismer 

As We See It 


News, Ed Morgan 
UN On Record 
Sports Roundup 

News 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


Talent, U.S.A. 


Al Heifer, Sports 
Pentagon Report 
Down You Go 
7:55 Cecil Brown 


Speaking Of Business 
Women In Uniform 
Dinner At The Green 
Room 


Dance Band 
Broadway's My Beat 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Talent, U.S.A. (Cent.) 


20 Questions 
Virginia Barn Dance 


Margaret Whiting's 
Dancing Party 


Gene Autry 
Tarzan 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Grande Ole Opry 


New England Barn- 
yard Jamboree 
Lombardo Land 


ABC Dancing Parly 
(Cont.) 


Gangbusters 
9:25 Win Elliot 

Gunsmoke 


10:00 

10:15 

R 1U:30 


Eddy Arnold Show 
Pee Wee King Show 


Chicago Theatre Of 
The Air 


At The Shamrock 
Orchestra 


Country Style 
News. Ed Morgan 



Sunday 



NBC MBS 



Morning Programs 

8:30 Jack Arthur 



ABC 



CBS 



9:00 
9:15 

9:30 
9:45 

10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 



11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 



World News Roundup 
We Hold These 

Truths 
Carnival Of Books 
Faith In Action 



National Radio 

Pulpit 
Art Of Living 
News, Peter Roberts 



Faultless Starch Time 
Viewpoint, U.S.A. 
UN Is My Beat 
Portrait Of Our Times 



Elder MIchaux 
Back To God 



Radio Bible Class 
Faith In Our Time 



Frank And Ernest 
Bromfield Reporting 
Reviewing Stand 



Light And Life Hour Renfro Valley Sun- 
day Gathering 



Milton Cross Album 
Voice Of Prophecy 



Message Of Israel 
College Choir 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 
12:15 
12:30 

12:45 



1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 



2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 



3:00 
3:15 



3:30 
3:45 



4:00 
4:15 
4:30 

4:45 



5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 



Sammy Kayo 
The Eternal Light 



Youth Wants To 

Know 
Univ. Of Chicago 

Round Table 



The Catholic Hour 
American Forum 



Critic At Large 
Youth Brings You 

Music 
Songs Of The Wild 
Elmo Ranger 



Hollywood Bowl 

Concert 
Jason And The 

Golden Fleece 



NBC Symphony 
Counter-Spy 



College Choirs 

News, Bill 

Cunningham 
Merry Mailman 



Fred Van Deventer 
Lanny Ross Show 
Lutheran Hour 
Game Of The Day 



Bandstand, U.S.A. 

Wings Of Healing 
Dixie Quartet 



Top Tunes With 
Trendler 

Musical Program 



Under Arrest 

Dear Margy, It's 

Murder 
4:55 Ed Pettit, News 



The Shadow 

True Detective 
Mysteries 



Fine Arts Quartet 
Christian In Action 



News 

The Great Fraud 

Piano Playhouse 



Trinity Choir 
Worid News Roundup 

E. Power Biggs 
Organ Concert 



Church Of The Air 



Herald Of Truth 
National Vespers 



Pan American Union 
U.S. Military Band 
Lone Pine and His 
Mountaineers 



Marines In Review 



Hour Of Decision 



Old-Fashioned 
Revival Hour 



This Week Around 

The World 
Greatest Story Ever 

Told 



Salt Lake Tabernacle 

Choir 
News, Peter Hackes 
11:25 Invitation To 

Learning 



News Story, Bill 

Costello 
Howard K. Smith 

News, Costello 



Galen Drake 

On A Sunday After- 
noon 



On A Sunday After- 
noon 

Wortd Music 
Festivals 



World Music 
Festivals 



World Music 
Festivals 



The World Today, 
Don Hoilenbeck 

On A Sunday After- 
noon 



On A Sunday After- 
noon 

Music, Music 

5:45 News, Bill 
Downs 

5:55 Cedric Adams 



Evening Programs 



6:00 

6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Bob Considine 

Meet The Veep 
Listen To Wash- 
ington 


Nick Carter 

6:25 Cecil Brown 
Squad Room 


Monday Morning 

Headlines 
Don Cornell 
George Sokolsky 


Quiz Kids 

Our Miss Brooks 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


Juvenile Jury 
UN Series 


Treasury Varieties 
Little Symphonies 


American Music Hall, 
Burgess Meredith, 
Emcee 


Guy Lombardo 

Richard Diamond 
with Dick Powell 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Tony Martin Show 
Best Plays 


Hawaii Calls 
Enchanted Hour 


American Music Hall 
(Cont.) 


Junior Miss 
My Little Margie 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


1 Confess 


Jazz Nocturne 

Answers For 
Americans 


Walter Winchell 
News, Taylor Grant 
The Adventurer, 
Burgess Meredith 


December Bride 
Escape 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 


Barrie Craig 
Meet The Press 


London Studio 

Melodies 
Music Of The People 


Paul Harvey 
Alistair Cooke 
Science Editor 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 
works 
News, Ed Morgan 
10:35 Listen To Korea 



Tv P''og''q"^ highlights 

NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN CHANNEL 6 JULY 11— AUGUST 10 



Baseball on TV 



Pre-game Programs: 
Happy Felton — 30 minutes before Dodger games Ch. 9 
Joe E. Brown — 15 minutes before Yankee games Ch. 11 



DATE 

Sat., July 11 

Sun., July 12 

Tues., July 14 
Thurs., July 16 

Fri., July 17 
Sat., July 18 

Sun., July 19 

Tues., July 21 

Wed., July 22 

Thurs., July 23 
Fri., July 24 

Sat., July 25 

Sun., July 26 

Wed., July 29 

Thurs., July 30 
Fri., July 31 
Sat. & Sun., 
Aug. 1 & 2 
Tues., Aug. 4 
Wed., Aug. 5 
Thurs., Aug. 6 
Fri., Aug. 7 
Sat., Aug. 8 
Sun., Aug. 9 



TIME 

1:30 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

2:05 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 

8:15 P.M. 



8:00 
8:15 
1:30 
8:00 
8:30 



P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 



1:30 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

2:05 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 
8:00 P.M. 

3:00 P.M. 



CAME CHANNEL 

Giants VS. Dodgers 9&6 

Washington vs. Yanks 11 
Washington vs. Yanks 11 
Giants vs. Dodgers 9 & 6 

All Star Game 11 

Chicago vs. Giants 11 

St. Louis vs. Dodgers 9 
St. Louis vs. Dodgers 9 
St. Louis vs. Dodgers 9 & 6 
Chicago vs. Giants 11 

Cine. vs. Dodgers (D) 9&6 
Milv>faukee vs. Giants 11 
Chicago vs. Dodgers 9 
Yanks at Cleveland 11 
Chicago vs. Dodgers 9 
Yanks at Cleveland 11 
Chicago vs. Dodgers 9 
Milwaukee vs. Dodgers 9 
Cine. vs. Giants 11 

Milwaukee vs. Dodgers 9 & 6 
Cine. vs. Giants 11 

Cine. vs. Giants 11 

Milwaukee vs. Dodgers 9&6 
Cleveland vs. Yanks 11 
Giants at Milwaukee 11 
Cleveland vs. Yanks 11 
Giants at Cine. 11 

Yanks at St. Louis 6 



P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 



Detroit vs. Yanks 
Detroit vs. Yanks 
Detroit vs. \anks 
Chicago vs. Yanks 
Chicago vs. Yanks 
Chicago vs. Yanks 



11 

11 

11 

11 

11&6 

11&6 



Post-game Programs: 

Happy Felton's Talk With The Stars Ch. 9 

Frankie Frisch's Your Extra Inning Ch. 11 

Joe E. Brown With The Yankees Ch. 11 



Monday through Friday 



7:00 A.M. Today • 4 & 6 

In the cool of morning, Garroway comes to breakfast. 
»:00 A.M. Margaret Arlen • 2 

Beauty, housekeeping hints and other fem talk for milady. 
10:00 A.M. Arthur Godfrey Time • 2 (M-Th) 
Robert Q-for-Qute Lewis presides over Arthur's gay gang. 
11:00 A.M. One In Every Family • 2 & 6 (M-Sat) 
From sunny California, Dean Miller brightens up the morning 
as emcee of variety type audience-participation show. 
llzSO A.M. Strike It Rich • 2 & « 
Contestants in need get chance at $500. Warren Hull, emcee. 
12:00 Noon Bride And Groom • 2 
Boy meets girl; boy loses girl; boy gets girl. Girl gets husband. 
12:13 P.M. love Of Life • 2 & G 

Serialized story of a woman, her career and personal problems. 
12:30 P.M. Search For Tomorrow • 2 & 6 
Tense situations stretch family bonds in this daily drama. 
12:45 P.M. Guiding Light • 2 (& 6 at 2:30 P.M.) 
Absorbing serial starring Herb Nelson and Ellen Demming, 
l:00 P.M. Journey Through Life • 2 
Couples relate human interest events that contributed to mar- 
riage success. Tom Reddy emcees and quizzes for prizes. 
1:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 & G 
Garry gallivants in variety with Durward, Denise and Ken. 



2:00 P.M. Double Or Nothing • 2 & G (M,W,F) 

Rousing Bert Parks sparks this studio audience quiz show. 

:i:00 P.M. The Big Pay-Off • 2 & G 

Lush prizes of mink, trips abroad, fem wardrobes with hubby on 

quiz spot. Randy Merriman emcees; Bess Myerson, hostess. 

3:00 P.M. Break The Bank • 4 

The show that has paid off two million in cash continues giving 

it away with Bud Collyer giving. Win Elliot as host. 

:t:00 P.M. Paul Dixon Show • 5 

Friendly, homey show as Paul, Wanda Lewis and Sis Camp 

pantomime and dance to pop recordings. From Zinzzinatti. 

3:HO P.M. Welcome Travelers • 4 & G 

Engaging Tommy Bartlett engages travelers in chit-chat. 

4:00 P.M. Time Out For Fun • 4 & G 

Fran Allison, famous as Kukla's friend and Aunt Fanny, in 

summer series that subs for first half of Kate Smith Show. 

4:30 P.M. Ladies Choice • 4 & G 

Johnny Dugan emcees variety from Hollywood. 

4:30 P.M. Ted Steele Show • 11 

Two hours of great pop music that goes to your head and feet. 

3:00 P.M. Uawkins Falls, Pop. G,200, • 4 

Humor and strong story line in this daily drama from Chi. 

G:30 P.M. Tex And .Jinx • 4 

Fascinating interviews and picture-features mark this show. 

7:30 P.M. Douylas Edwards With The News • 2 

Late evening headlines and news stories with brisk commentary. 

7:30 P.M. Eddy Arnold • 4 (T,Th) 

Eddy subs for Dinah Shore with Western and hillbilly songs. 

7:30 P.M. Eddie Fisher Show • 4 (W,F) 

The sensational, young balladeer with Don Ameche as host. 

7:45 P.M. Chesterfield Show • 2 fM,W,F) 

Vocalists Helen O'Connell and Bob Eberle carry on for Como. 

7:45 P.M. V.S.A. Canteen • 2 (T,Th) 

Chirpy Theresa Brewer hits the high notes as Jane Froman hits 

the high road for a well-deserved vacation in the sun. 

7:45 P.M. News Caravan • 4 & G 

John Cameron Swayze's TV newsreel of the day's big events. 



Monday P.M. 



7:30 P.M. Bob And Ray • 4 

The comedy duo lowers the boom in rib-tickling satire. 

7:30 P.M. Opera Vs. Jazz. • 7 

Lovely Nancy Kenyon referees musical title bouts that feature 

concert and opera stars against big name pop singers. 

8:00 P.M. Burns and Allen Show • 2 

Situation comedy as Gracie confuses Georgie. 

»:00 P.M. I'm The Law • 5 

Sleek, slick George Raft in tough-guy adventure series. 

SzOO P.M. Homicide Squad • 7 

Whodunits starring suave Tom Conway as Inspector Mark Saber. 

tt:30 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

More of Moore as Garry heads up his lively talent showcase. 

9:00 P.M. Racket Syuad • 2 & G 

Reed Hadley as Captain Braddock. 

»:30 P.M. Masquerade Party • 2 & G 

Genial Bud Collyer emcees this delightful guess-who show. 

9:30 P.M. Robert Montgomery Presents • 4 

The full-hour theatre continues with a summer stock company. 

10:00 P.M. Summer Theatre • 2 & G 

Studio One, incognito, with cool entertainment for hot nights. 

10:30 P.M. Who Said That? • 4 

Quiz quotes from the news. Walter Kiernan queries panel. 



Tuesday 



7:30 P.M. Beulah • 7 

Beulah (Louise Beavers) as the Henderson housekeeper turns 

stormy domestic situations into uproarious comedy. 

8:00 P.M. Juvenile Jury • 4 & G M 

Knee-pants panel parries Jack Barry's barrage of questions. 

77 



TV Pi'OQi'cim highlights 



S:30 P.M. Break The Bank • 4 & 6 

The ebullient Mr. Parks heads nighttime edition of quiz. 

9iOO P.M. Crime Syndicated • 2 & H 

Vivid dramatic exposes. Alternating weekly, City Hospital. 

9:00 P.M. ISothing But The Best • 4 

Repeats of the best plays of last season's Fireside Theatre. 

9:30 P.M. Suspense • 2 & « 

Eerie stories that vary from naturalism to sheer fantasy. 

9s30 P.M. Candid Camera • 4 

Allen Funt's novelty series. 

9i30 P.M. The Big Issue • 5 

Politics argued here. Martha Rountree is your moderator. 

I0:00 P.M. Banger • 2 

Mysteries highly recommended for spine-chilling on hot nights. 

lOiOO P.M. Tu-o For The Moneg • 4 & O 

Exciting cash quiz emceed by laconic wit, Herb Shriner. 

10:30 P.M. The Name's The Same • 7 

Perky panel show with Robert Q. Lewis posted as moderator 

and featuring folks with noted or novel names. , 



Wednesday 



7t30 P.M. Bate With Judy • 7 

Teen-age star Mary Linn Beller creates hectic, hilarious havoc. 

StOO P.M. Godfrey And His Friends • 2 & 6 

Big name stars* fill Godfrey's shoes as emcee in a glittering 

variety hour featuring Marion Marlowe, Frank Parker, others. 

B:00 P.M. I Married Joan • 4 

Joan Davis in zany situation comedy. Reruns for the summer. 

8:30 P.M. Music Hall • 4 

Gay. lilting, delightful show sparked by Patti Page. Alternate 

weeks. Cavalcade of America's stirring documentaries. 

8:30 P.M. Straw Batters • 5 

Popular Johnny Olsen heads a good-time revue from Palisades. 

8:30 P.M. China Smith • 7 

Dan Duryea as daredevil soldier-of-fortune in the Orient. 

9:00 P.M. Strike It Kick • 2 & 6 

The show with a heart pays hard cash to worthy contestants. 

9sOO P.M. Kraft Theatre • 4 

Fine performances are the rule here in adult TV drama. 

9:30 P.M. The Hunter • 2 

Keith Larsen in title role of mystery-adventure series. 

9:30 P.M. Wrestling From Hainbo • 7 

Wayne Griffin, from his foxhole, describes the muscle men. 

lOzOO P.M. This Is Your Life • 4 

Ralph Edwards' unique and emotional surprise TV biography. 



Thursday 



8:00 P.M. Thi> Best Of Groucho • 4 & H 

The funniest of the past season's You Bet Your Life with mad- 
libber Marx. On non-inflammable film, of course. 
8:30 P.M. Four Star Playhouse • 2 
Excellent half-hour dramas filmed in Hollywood. Alternating 
weekly with Tales Of The City, new series featuring the stories 
of Pulitzer-Academy winner Ben Hecht. 
8:30 P.M. Chance Of A Lifetime • 7 & H 
Competition-spiced telecasts as personable Dennis James pre- 
sents young professional entertainers and a guest celebrity. 
9iOO P.M. Lux %'ideo Theatre • 2 & « 
Romance and/or comedy in this fine 30-minute film series. 
9:00 P.M. Braynet • 4 

Jack Webb continues to put the squeeze on criminals but in 
film reruns of the past year's most exciting adventures. 
9:00 P.M. Treasure Hunt • .7 
Sigmund Rothchild's fascinating appraisal of old relics. 
9:30 P.M. Biy Town • 2 

Headline adventures of reporter Steve Wilson (Pat McVey). 
9:30 P.M. Ford Theatre • 4 & 
Dramatic fare to take your mind off the boiling weather. 
I0:00 P.M. My Little Maryie • 2 
Little Margie played by not-so-little but yes-so-pretty Gale 
Storm in situation comedy co-starring Charles Farrell. 
I0:00 P.M. Martin Kane, Private Eye • 4 & ti 
'" Suspects unlimited l)ut Kane (Lee Tracy) gets his man. 

I0:30 P.M. Foreign Intrigue • 4 (&ttat il:00 P.M.) 
Outstanding espionage series filmed abroad by Jerome Thor. 



Friday 



7:30 P.M. Stu Erwin Show • 7 

Frolicsome stories with Stu and his wife, June CoUyer. 

8:00 P.M. Ghost Chasers • 2 

Spooks replace Mama for summer. 

8:00 P.M. Bennis Bay Show • 4 

Laugh-inspired situations with Dennis as the harried bachelor. 

8:30 P.M. First Edition • 4 & 8 

Fred Coe produces live drama while Riley (Bill Bendix) rests. 

9:00 P.M. Playhouse Of Stars • 2 

Big names in drama adapted from stories of top-notch writers. 

9:00 P.M. Boorway To Banger • 4 & 6 

Sinister, suspense drama summer-subbing for The Big Story. 

9:00 P.M. Life Begins At Eighty • S 

Riotous, unpredictable, oldster panel. Jack Barry as emcee. 

9:30 P.M. Earn Your Vacation • 2 

Quiz show gives away two weeks here and there. 

9:30 P.M. Bouble Or Nothing • 4 & 8 

It's all or nothing at all in the famous, super-charged quiz. 

10:00 P.M. Twenty Questions • S 

Ever popular radio-TV game with Jay Jackson. 

10:30 P.M. Bown You Got • 5 

Chicago's grand contribution to panel shows with Dr. Bergen 

Evans, Toni Oilman, Carmelita Pope. Robert Breen, others. 



Saturday 



7:00 P.M. stork Club • 2 

Sherm Billingsley visits with you in his glamorous Cub Room. 

7:30 P.M. Beat The Clock • 2 

Bud Collyer emcees as couples try tricky stunts for prizes. 

8:00 P.M. Larry Storeh Show • 2 

Versatile comic Storeh with plenty of laugh-provoking ideas. 

8:00 P.M. My Hero • 4 & 8 

Reruns of the past year's humorous episodes in the life of 

Robert Beanblossom, humbler, played by Robert Cummings. 

8:30 P.M. Original Amateur Hour • 4 & 8 

Talented amateurs get their big break. Ted Mack, emcee. 

9:00 P.M. This Is Show Business • 2 

Panel-variety headed by chipper Mr. Fadiman. 

9:00 P.M. Saturday Night Revue • 4 & 8 

A comedy-music fest headed by Hoagy Carmichael who serves 

up Stardust in the form of comedians and dancers new to TV. 

9:30 P.M. Meet Millie • 2 

Delightful dilemmas of a Manhattan steno (Elena Verdugo) 

supported by Florence Halop as Mama ; Marv Kaplin as Alfred. 

10:00 P.M. Medallion Theatre • 2 

Premiere July 12 of new dramatic show produced by William 

Spier recently noted for his achievements on Omnibus. 

10:30 P.M. Private Secretary • 4 & 8 

Ann Sothern as the pulchritudinous secretary. 



Sunday 



2:30 P.M. Hollywood Off Beat • 2 

Melvyn Douglas stars as tough, sophisticated private investi 

gator, Steve Randall, in Hollywood-set mystery thrillers. 

5:00 P.M. Super Circus • 7 

For youth of all ages, tingling, colorful, big-ring variety. 

7:00 P.M. You Asked For It • 7 

Art Baker's answer to the public's demands for the unusual. 

8:00 P.M. Toast Of The Town • 2 & 8 

TV's king-sized, spectacular variety, headed by Ed Sullivan 

8:00 P.M. The Big Pay-Off • 4 

Giveaway show subs for Comedy Hour. 

9:00 P.M. CE Theatre • 2 

Dramatic series starring Hollywood names subs for Fred Waring 

9:00 P.M. TV Playhouse • 4 & 8 

Your big Sunday theatre with live, superior teleplays. 

9:00 P.M. Rocky Kiny, Betective • 5 

Assorted criminals are the target for Roscoe Karns. 

9:30 P.M. Arthur Murray Bance Party • 2 

Mrs. Murray, Kathryn to you, femcees sparkling, gay variety 

10:00 P.M. The Web • 2 

Plots that tingle with suspense. Jonathan Blake, narrator. 

t0:30 P.M. What's My Line? • 2 

Surprises and chuckles on this guess-your-occupation show with 

John Daly, plus Arlene Francis, Dorothy Kilgallen, others. 



I 



Mr. Amateur Hour 

(Contimied from page 31) 
pei-severe. After his mother died, the 
aspiring musician was raised by his father. 
a railroader. And, when he decided to 
master the saxophone, he was warned in 
no uncertain terms that, because his father 
had to sleep during the day, he must con- 
fine his musical efforts to the closet. 

A lad who would volunteer to teach 
himself to play the saxophone in a light - 
less closet can do just about anything, 
and that's what millions of people believe 
about Mr. Amateur Hour. Ted Mack. 

This sax-playing youngster is today the 
beloved conductor of The Original Ama- 
teur Hour. His comforting voice, his mild 
manner, his understanding way, have guid- 
ed thousands of talented amateurs, have 
proved an inspiration to millions of the 
show's viewers and listeners. 

Daily an avalanche of letters strikes 
Ted's office — letters asking for advice, 
offering thanks for guidance, radiating 
warmth, making him a confidant. This 
proves bewildering to Ted, who has never 
attempted to be philosophical, to offer 
guidance, to spout patriotism, or to be 
all- knowing. 

Yet the letters pour in by the tens of 
thousands. A Columbus, Ohio, lawyer 
writes: 

"You have one of the finest ail-American 
programs on the air, and your attitude 
and conduct do more for Americanism than 
all the spyeeches of our senators, represen- 
tatives, and educators combined. . . ." 

A St. Louis woman writes, "Regardless 
of race, creed, or color, you treat everyone 
so sweet and nice. I just can't help ad- 
miring you and wish there were more men 
like you." 

A pathetic letter comes from a Kansas 
City, Missouri, girl. Her mother, sixteen- 
year-old brother and she had attended an 
Original Amateur Hour radio-stage show 
there a few weeks before. The brother 
had been enraptured by Ted and the per- 
formers. He spoke of the show most of 
that night and the next day — when he 
was killed in an auto accident. Would 
Ted kindly write a letter to the mother, 
enclosing a picture? It would mean so 
much. 

A full-time staff works continually on 
the letters — letters which share intimate 
details of personal lives, tell of loneliness 
meant only for the ears of a close friend, 
express gratitude for a word of cheer 
which has lifted someone from despair. 

"I don't know how this kind of response 
to our entertainment began," Ted com- 
ments, in a voice which is as gentle off 
the air as on. "Perhaps people sense that, 
in trying to put the amateurs on the right 
course, we're giving courage also to the 
folks seeing and listening, for everybody 
has some unrealized hope." 

Ted knows all about unrealized hopes 
and dreams because the course of his own 
life has not been smooth. Yet success 
hasn't changed him, and his universal ap- 
peal may well be due to the fact that 
the average man is able to find in Ted's 
words and actions simplicity and guidance 
which strike close to home. Ted knows 
well the aches that beset the average 
heart, for he has experienced so many of 
them. 

Mr. Amateur Hour was born William 
Edward Maguiness in Greeley, Colorado, 
on Lincoln's Birthday, 1904. Shortly after- 
ward came his first heartache, the death 
of his mother. 

Determined to get an education, he 
( worked his way through school, and, no 
longer confining his sax to the soundproof- 
ing of a closet, he organized his own 
L orchestra in high school. Later, at the 




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R 

M 

79 



law, commerce, and drama, he delighted 
the Lindy-hoppers and Charleston set with 
another orchestra. 

Music was now a vital part of Ted's 
life. The Maguiness orchestra (he was 
not yet known as Ted Mack) was an 
immediate hit, and Ted's solo numbers 
wowed the audiences. Because he was 
faced with the small problem of earning 
room and board, his orchestra engagements 
became a necessity, and he had to for- 
sake college for a more practical educa- 
tion in the school of hard knocks. 

The ambitious musician, resembling 
many of the amateurs whom he helps 
today, never failed to take advantage of 
every opportunity. It was this will that 
carried him through some rugged days. 
Ted often reminisces about other strug- 
gling musicians who, on empty stomachs, 
strove for recognition. In his early bands 
were such eager young fellows as Glenn 
Miller and Matty Malnick. Later Ted 
played in Ben Pollock's band with an- 
other young hopeful, Benny Goodman. 

It was at this point that maestro Mack 
found himself on the West Coast, where he 
organized another orchestra. But there 
was something which made this one quite 
different from his previous groups. He 
had taken on a partner — a partner who 
has shared his aches and joys with him 
for the past twenty-seven years. Her 
name was Marguerite Overholt. Though 
she and Ted had been school-day sweet- 
hearts in Denver, they had not seen each 
other in three years. Their reunion took 
place in San Diego, where Marguerite was 
teaching school and Ted was playing a 
theatre. There they were married. 

Though she was to live in hotel rooms 
for the next twenty years, often just a few 
jumps ahead of starvation. Marguerite 
insists today that she would not trade 
those years for gold. 

Marguerite and Ted made a wonderful 
team, which always proved to be a calm- 
ing influence on the rest of the troupe. 
They laugh now as they recall one stormy 
night when their little band of "gypsies" 
wound its way around a dangerous moun- 
tain road to play an engagement at an 
Arizona mining town. As they always did, 
Ted and Marguerite headed the pro- 
cession, cutting their way through the 
sheets of rain that engulfed them. Mar- 
guerite was driving, while Ted was catch- 
ing a cat nap in the back seat to ready 
himself for the next show. At the highest 
ledge, the car began slipping. 

"Dearest," Marguerite said quietly, as 
she held her foot on the brake, "could you 
get out and put a stone behind the left rear 
wheel?" 

Ted rubbed the sleep from his eyes, but 
it took him only a second to wake com- 
pletely when he looked out to see the 
rear wheel only a half inch from a drop 
into nothingness! 

The crisis that followed the next day 
was even worse, according to the very 
prayerful couple. The troupe's fan dancer 
had shaken her way right into some young 
man's heart at their last stop and had 
decided to settle down as a homemaker. 
When the theatre manager at the little 
mining town greeted the troupe — minus 
one fan dancer — he yelled, "Your act is 
canceled!" Miners liked their fan dancers, 
he explained ruefully, and the troupe was 
worthless to him without one. 

Trouble-shooting Ted, with his usual 
alacrity, sloshed through the town's muddy 
streets to the local high school, where he 
had the art instructor turn his entire 
class to making a large cellophane fan with 
corks inserted between the leaves to keep 
them open. 
R "This really was the beginning of pro- 
IH gressive education," Ted insists. 

Now all he needed was a dancer to get 
behind tlie Ian. After much persuasion, 

ay 



the wife of one of his musicians bravely 
made her debut as a fan dancer. 

The troupe depended on Ted, and he 
never let them down. There was the time 
they were snowbound on a mountain pass, 
and there were plenty of times when they 
didn't have enough money for breakfast. 
But, somehow, he always pulled them 
through. 

It was after their mountain experiences 
that William Maguiness became known as 
Ted Mack. Ted was a nickname which his 
childhood pals had stuck him with, and he 
liked it. But the name Mack was not 
of his own choosing. Ted had the oppor- 
tunity to play the waterfront city of San 
Pedro, California, but the job called for 
someone who could give and take the 
rough wisecracks tossed up by the sailors. 
Because the troupe had developed the 
inconvenient habit of eating three meals 
daily, Ted accepted the job. 

When he and Marguerite arrived at 
the theatre, opening night, their hearts 
sank. On the marquee was "Ted Mack And 
Band." Ted fell upon the manager. "I 
thought I was booked in here. Now you 
have somebody else!" 

"Take it easy, son," replied the manager. 
"I couldn't get 'Maguiness' on the marquee. 
Besides, no sailor in this here port could 
pronounce a name like Maguiness. I 
gotta have an ordinary person with an 
ordinary name. And Mack it's got to be." 

The handsome emcee decided not to 
worry about the sailors out front. He did 
what he has always done. He merely 
acted himself. The sailors liked his easy 
manner as he introduced the acts, and 
soon other theatres put in a bid for this 
quiet, easygoing guy who wasn't afraid to 
face an audience. 

Despite good bookings, Ted's troupe 
could not stay ahead of their costs, and it 
was in Columbus, Ohio, that they finally 
ran out of money. Ted's personality ex- 
tended itself even here, and the manager 
not only gave him credit but loaned him 
$500 more. 

"It never occurred to us," Marguerite ex- 
plains today, "that we could have lessened 
our trouble by reducing the size of the 
orchestra. Ted never wanted to give less 
than the best." 





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The movies were next to call upon the 
genial impresario's talents. At M-G-M, he 
directed the orchestra in "The Great 
Ziegfeld" and "Beat the Band." 

All this time the maestro had been 
gaining a reputation as a developer of 
talent, never dreaming that this would be 
his greatest achievement. This forte was 
recognized by one Lou Goldberg, who was 
soon to become an important person in 
Ted's life. Goldberg was general manager 
for the many traveling units of Major 
Edward Bowes, who had originated "The 
Family Hour in 1925 and, nine years later. 
The Original Amateur Hour, for which he 
was internationally famous. Goldberg 
grabbed Ted up as a talent scout and de- 
veloper for the Bowes organization. 

The Major was known the world over 
and when his perennially popular voice 
was stilled in 1945, The Original Amateur 
Hour died with him — at least for the mo- 
ment. Jobless, Ted and Marguerite looked 
forward once more to starting from scratch. 

It was a year or so later when Lou 
Goldberg informed Ted that some of the 
Major's old group thought they could re- 
vive The Original Amateur Hour. They 
wanted Ted to take the helm. 

The man who had bravely faced rough 
audiences of miners and sailers, who had 
battled hunger many times, was, frankly, 
plain scared. 

"Just be yourself," Goldberg advised. 

Ted could not help but be himself. 
Success was instantaneous, and four years 
later the show was priced at three million 
dollars! 

On the road, the show is a sellout, with 
the entire proceeds going to charity. And 
recently Ted went to Korea to organize 
and direct twenty-six G.I. talent shows 
in twenty-six days, each at a different 
place behind the front lines. For this, he 
was awarded a medallion on behalf of 
General Maxwell Taylor, commander of 
the Eighth Army. Then Ted rushed to 
New York to resume his televised broad- 
casts of The Original Amateur Hour. 

With all this well-earned success, Ted 
Mack is still restless. He worries that he 
is not doing enough for the people who 
have faith in him. He is troubled with a 
sense of guilt that he does not possess 
all the wisdom his many followers think 
he does, when they write to him for ad- 
vice. Ted has never pretended to be any- 
thing but an emcee and an entertainer, 
but he believes that a man must con- 
stantly improve himself. Therefore, he is 
always torn between the desire to devote 
all his time to expanding his activities with 
the amateurs and the desire to retire to 
his small home at Irvington-on-Hudson. 

Still somewhat shy and completely un- 
assuming, Ted heads for home and lovely 
Marguerite when a business meeting or 
broadcast doesn't keep him in town. The 
two troupers find their greatest pleasure 
working in the garden. They celebrated 
their twenty-sixth anniversary by plant- 
ing new bushes in the yard. 

"We've always wanted this — the home, 
the garden, the trees, the quiet," Mar- 
guerite says with a smile. "Everybody 
longs for a home, security, a confidante, 
and peace of soul, I believe. Perhaps Ted, 
in his sincere, quiet manner, is a confidante 
people trust. He surely knows what trouble 
is. But he realizes, also, that trouble adds 
a great deal to a person if he can accept 
it as part of his education and develop- 
ment." 

After many years of struggling — not 
without their warm and humorous mo- 
ments — the determination and faith which 
Ted called forth in teaching himself to 
play the saxophone, and which he has 
imparted to thousands of talented ama- 
teurs, have brought his dreams to fulfill- 
ment, just as he has made the dreams of so 
many others a reality. 



Lili Darvas 



{Continued from page 40) 
mother said no. Cook would see that we 
got them, just to see our faces light up. 
She probably thought a few cookies more 
or less didn't matter, and she wanted us 
to be happy. 

"All of these things came flooding back 
into my memory when I began to create 
the character of Hannah. So she is very 
real. A wonderful person. Someone you 
can love, and admire." 

As Mrs. Norris, on another daytime 
radio serial, When A Girl Marries, Miss 
Darvas must make herself into a com- 
pletely different type of woman. "Mrs. 
Norris is a cultured older woman, well 
bred and well educated, in contrast to 
Hannah's lack of formal education and 
of poUsh. Remember how, in Hilltop House, 
Hannah must ask a child to help her when 
she has to write a letter, because her 
spelling is so luicertain? Mrs. Norris, of 
course, has no such problems, but the two 
women have one thing in common. It's a 
kind of goodness, although each expresses 
it quite differently. A need to be helpful 
to those in trouble. And it is interesting 
to see how it is expressed by two such 
contrasting types of women. It makes them 
both so challenging to play." 

Watching Miss Darvas talk about these 
women, with whom she has such a deep 
sympathy that she can portray them with 
a rare understanding, her own warmth 
and her interest in everything that goes on 
around her are apparent. She is an intense 
woman, with reddish -blonde hair and 
hazel-green eyes, and every inch the ac- 
tress. Mature, yet youthful, simply dressed 
but with the chic of the Continental wom- 
an who has traveled all over the world 
and knows how to choose and modify the 
fashions that best suit her. Yet she is a 
woman who loves home and perhaps ap- 
preciates it more than other women do, 
because it was long denied her. 

"I have been in the theatre since I was 
sixteen," she reminds you, "and only after 
I arrived in New York, in 1938, did I at 
last have a real home. Other women may 
dream all their lives of Living in apart- 
ments and giving up home responsibilities 
as families grow up and conditions change, 
but I dreamed always of setthng down 
somewhere with my beloved possessions 
around me, creating my own kind of 
home." 

Her European career as an actress, be- 
gun in her home city of Budapest against 
the wishes of her family, had been fos- 
tered by Max Reinhardt, who starred the 
lovely and talented young actress in his 
famous theatrical productions in BerUn 
and Vienna and the other great cities of 
Europe. Playwrights created some of their 
best works for her — among them Ferenc 
Molnar, whom she later married and who 
died a year ago. Lili fled from Vienna, 
where she was appearing in a play, when 
Hitler's armies began their march. After 
her arrival in America, Lili appeared on 
Broadway in Maurice Evans' production 
of "Hamlet," in the George Kaiifman- 
Edna Ferber play, "Bravo," and in many 
others. 

Work on the American stage and in 
radio and TV at last allowed Lili to have 
the home she always wanted. The living 
room of her apartment reveals her passion 
for fine old things, all the reminders of 
the life that used to be. Contrasted with 
these is her bedroom, thoroughly twen- 
tieth-century modem in furnishings. Nos- 
talgia for the old is only one side of her 
nature. The other side is an attempt to 
live in the present, enjoying today's 
things today. The dining portion of her 



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R 

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81 



living room has a table, the pedestal of 
which is a desk from her childhood home. 
The chairs are fine examples of Bieder- 
meyer, of a richly dark old Hungarian 
wood. The same wood forms the frame of 
a fine old sofa, upholstered in dark green. 
An antique tall clock, little tables, chairs, 
lamps and ornaments are from her old 
European home or were collected in her 
travels. The predominating color note is 
green, in a deep, restful shade. 

The bedroom is all light color, even the 
wood of the furniture. A modern bed is 
recessed between two tall wardrobes 
which flank it on each side. Dressing table, 
chests, chairs and stools and lamps are 
all strictly America 1953. So is the com- 
pact little kitchen. 

Strictly America 1953 are the house- 
keeping problems, also. Like all women 
who have interests outside the home — 
and one doesn't have to be an actress, of 
course, for this — Miss Darvas has had to 
learn to apportion her time and energy to 
handle both jobs as well as possible. 

"I am a very orderly person by nature," 
she explains. "I would like everything to 
be completely tidy. I dream of being a 
perfect housewife. My two regular pro- 
grams. Hilltop House and When A Girl 
Marries, take just so much of my time 
and I can plan the rest. I know what I can 
do at home, and what must be left un- 
done. But then I get a television role, or 
a play, and the schedule is all off. If it's 
a role on a TV drama, there are rehearsals 
and costume fittings, and lines to be 
studied. There are always such roles — on 



Hallmark Theatre, Studio One, the Rob- 
ert Montgomery show, Lux Video Thea- 
tre, Kraft Television Theatre, and many 
others. They are wonderful opportunities, 
but it is demanding of time. When I am 
busy with these things, I shut my eyes 
to the demands of my home. Somewhere 
in my day, I have made the time to do 
recordings for Free Europe, to be beamed 
to the Iron Curtain countries where free- 
dom is at the moment only a word. This, 
of course, I feel is a precious privilege. 

"Yet I know my home is always there, 
waiting for me. That is the big thing. Then 
such matters as not finding the time to 
order the new vacuum cleaner, with the 
old one practically falling apart, do not 
seem too important. A lull will finally 
come, and then we will work like mad 
getting the house just the way we want 
it. I can take time to cook a little, and I 
can enjoy being a housewife." 

The Darvas household now consists of 
the maid, who has been there for ten years 
and learned her cooking from Lili's moth- 
er — "which makes her a very good cook." 
And a friendly taffy-colored cocker span- 
iel whom they call Mommie, "in view of 
her motherly — almost grandmotherly — 
demeanor after thirteen years." Mommie 
has grown quite deaf, but she is a sweet 
old girl. 

Lili's first radio audition is something 
she will never forget. It was for the role 
of Mme. Sophie in a dramatic serial. We 
Love And Learn. 

"On the day I auditioned, I had a bad 
cold. I wasn't feeling well, I was hoarse 



and uncomfortable, and I felt I had done 
a poor job of reading. I was holding back 
the tears when I left the microphone, sort 
of mumbling to myself about how awful 
I had been. A group of people were stand- 
ing near the door, and one man asked me 
what was so awful, having overheard my 
self -recrimination. 'Oh,' I said. 'It's my 
cold. This awful cold.' 

" 'You had better hold on to it,' he an- 
swered, and I wondered what he meant. 
I went out and made for the nearest shop 
and bought myself a new dress to raise my 
spirits, an old trick of us women when 
we are unhappy. When I got home my 
maid told me the phone had been ringing 
for me, and I later found that the caller 
wanted to know how soon I would be 
free to take over the role of Mme. Sophie. 
'And please hang on to that cold,' I was 
told. 'Your voice sounded just right.' Of 
course my happiness at this turn of events 
completely cured my cold. But my voice 
must have been all right — with cold or 
without — because I played Mme. Sophie 
for about a year and a half, which was 
the length of time the program remained 
on the air. I was very fond of her. 

"I am fond of all the people I do on 
radio. I could not play them, day after 
day, if I did not believe in them. Mrs. 
Norris, in When A Girl Marries, is like 
many women I have known and admired. 
Hannah, the lovely Hungarian cook in 
Hilltop House, is someone I have loved 
very much. Playing them has enriched my 
life, and that is what working should do 
for a woman." 



Love Lives With Millie 



{Continued jrom page 42) 
hope, laughter, have been part of Elena's 
living plan ever since she was married to 
Charles some seven years ago. 

"In fact," laughed Elena, "it was Char- 
lie's wonderful sense of proportion — his 
good-humored acceptance of things as 
they are — which first impressed me. We 
met at Universal-International studios, 
where I was acting and Charles was writ- 
ing. My closest friend, Joan Shawnlee, 
introduced us. 

"I was quite thrilled," said Elena, "be- 
cause the first thing Charlie said was: 
'Would you like to go to the opening night 
a., Mocambo this evening?' You can im- 
agine how impressed I was! (Mocambo, 
Hollywood's swankiest night club, on 
opening night of a show, is something any 
girl would be pleased to attend.) I gave 
him the address of my family's place in 
Northridge (which is a sleeper jump from 
Hollywood) . That night, dressed in my 
best new outfit, I waited — and waited — • 
and waited. Since we had no phone and 
the Western Union office closed at five 
in our faraway suburb, I finally had to 
give up and go to bed. 

"The next day on the Abbott and Costel- 
lo set, Charles avoided me like the plague. 
I couldn't stand the suspense and finally 
approached him. 'I'm so glad you're still 
speaking to me,' he said. 'I'd never have 
had the nerve to speak to you again! I 
lost the keys to my car!' 

"So, while I had sat in the dusk with my 

family, an equally miserable Charlie had 

been sitting in his best blue serge in his 

keyless auto, trying to think what he could 

do. He tried telephoning and, of course, 

there was no number for us. He was so 

upset that I felt sorrier for him than I 

did for myself. But, from the first, we never 

let little things like that get us down. 

R So when Charlie asked if I'd like to try the 

M Mocambo again I jumped at the chance— 

I mean I accepted." 

According to Elena, the pretty, assured, 

82 



blonde actress of today is a far cry from 
the dark -haired, naive girl of eight years 
ago. "I was strictly a square," she laughed. 
"I don't know what Charlie saw in me. I 
think we got married so he wouldn't have 
to drive me that long way home after 
every date." 

Charlie and Elena didn't have much of 
an engagement. After several months of 
dating, it hit Elena one day at the studio 
that she was in love with Charlie. So she 
got him on the phone. "Charlie," she said, 
"do you love me?" 

Charlie may have been taken back by 
surprise but he didn't show it. His imme- 
diate reaction was simply, "Yes, of course, 
I love you. Will you marry me?" 

"Yes," said Elena. "When?" 

"Now," said Charlie, "as soon as possi- 
ble, today, immediately, this very minute! 
We'll elope!" 

"So," said Elena, "the only one I told 
was Lou Costello. He promised to help us, 
made arrangements for the tickets and the 
plane and everything. The only thing I 
needed was a bag and a few clothes from 
home. 

"In the evening, Charlie and I drove out 
to Northridge to my parents' place to pick 
up my clothes and quietly slip away. When 
we got to the long drive that led up to the 
house we found the gate locked. We 
couldn't get in. Then suddenly there was 
my mother. 'I hear you're going to elope,' 
she said. 

"Well, what could I say. I sat in the car 
and blinked at my mother with my mouth 
open. But she was very sweet. We all 
went into the house and had coffee, a bite 
to eat and a long talk. It turned out that 
Lou had called our Hollywood newspaper 
columnist, Louella Parsons, to tell her 
about the elopement. Louella had sent her 
photographer to the airport and he waited 
there for us. (He may still be there.) Then 
she called the studio to verify the report. 
The studio has a standing rule that if you 
are working in a picture you can't leave 



the city and certainly you can't go ciny- 
where in an airplane. The studio people 
sent a messenger to my mother. All of 
this in the time it took us to drive out to 
Northridge. Over cups of coffee, my mother 
convinced us to wait and have the mar- 
riage in a church." 

Elena's and Charles's cheerful optimism 
was put to a severe test their first year of 
marriage. "We had to be cheerful," said 
Elena, "because we were so poor we 
couldn't afford anything but hope and op- 
timism. We were so poor, in fact, it was 
ridiculous! We had one dress -up outfit 
each. We called them our 'Gonna-get-a- 
job suits.' But then, everyone we knew 
was broke, so we made a joke of it." 

Besides the money problems, the newly- 
weds had their own brand of family prob- 
lems. It started with the marriage. "Since 
I came from a very old and very strict 
Spanish family, it was difficult to break 
away. This was in 1945 and my brothers 
were still in service, leaving me the only 
one at home. 

"The first year of marriage, supposed to 
be the hardest, didn't turn out that way. 
Our problems didn't have a chance. We 
just didn't pay any attention to them. 
Time, better than words, took care of the 
family problems. Now I come second to 
my son and husband in my family's affec- 
tions. We didn't even let money problems 
worry us. Why should we? We certainly 
didn't have any money!" 

But times got better for the Marions, 
and with the improvements came changes. 
Little Richard was born July 1, 1949, and 
by the time he was two, Charles was an 
established screen writer. 

Shortly after Richard entered Elena's 
life, so did Virginia Cullatt, who came to 
work with Elena in caring for Richard. 
"Virginia's last name," explained Elena, 
"should be Marion. She's one of the family 
and it seems like she's been with us for- 
ever." 

Big, amiable Virginia not only adores 



the Marion family, but sometimes has the 
upper hand — especially in settling argu- 
ments. "Not only does Virginia look after 
both the house and little Richard, but she 
listens to my lines, criticizes the show, 
helps me watch my diet with special 
dishes, remarks on Charlie's writing." 

It's possible for Elena to be tempera- 
mental. Good-naturedly temperamental, 
that is. Her uprisings don't last more than 
a few seconds and they are generally di- 
rected at Charles when they both come in 
from work. These brief bubbles of excite- 
ment fail to last more than a few seconds, 
for Virginia has her own special way of 
setthng them. 

"Now Mizz Marion," she says, "you're 
just tired. You sit down for a minute and 
111 tell you about Richard's day. . . " 

Since late 1952, the role of Millie Bron- 
son has become part of Elena. "At first I 
couldn't see it," she explained. "I didn't 
think the part was for me. In fact, I tried 
to sell our director, Bill ManhofE, and 
Harry Ackerman, our CBS executive, my 
friend Joan Shawnlee. 'She's just the girl 
for it, Mr. Ackerman,' I said. 1 really 
think you should give the part to her.' 

"But that wonderful Mr. Manhoff said, 
'No, you're the one for the part, Elena,' 
and so I was working again. 

"I'm so identified with the part now," 
she said, "the kids always call out, 'Hello, 
Meet Millie,' or 'Hello, Millie Bronson.' 
The neighborhood children don't know I 
have another name." 

The advent of Meet Millie brought other 
changes to the household, too. Elena 
learned (again) that Charles wasn't cut 
out to be the business manager of the 
family. "When we were first married," she 
said, "I found out he'd been a bachelor too 
long. Came the first of the month and he 
ignored the bills. Pretty soon I was get- 
ting calls from the creditors. 

"So I took over. I think it's better that 
way. A man has other details to look after. 
But last Christmas I was so swamped with 
Millie that Charlie took over the finances 
again. All went well (I thought) until I 
started getting those old calls from cred- 
itors. "Charlie, my boy,' I said, 'the time 
has come — ' " 

It was then Elena's mother stepped in 
to help manage the finances. "Charlie's 
happy, I'm happy, and the creditors are 
delirious!" 

Elena and Charles, with their own brand 
of cheer and optimism, are letting the fu- 
ture take care of itself. ''We're working 
toward our own home and bi'others and 
sisters for Richard, but we don't make a 
production of anything. We just live to- 
gether happily, and don't take things too 
big." 

Their seventh wedding anniversary, 
which they celebrated last March 24, illus- 
trates their easygoing attitude. "What do 
you want to do, honey?" asked Charlie. 

"Gee, maybe we should have the gang 
over. You know, Joan and her husband, 
Sydney Miller, Howard Leeds, Fran Os- 
born and Chuckle Bradley. Have a terrific 
party!" 

"Maybe we should go out to dinner and 
a night club," suggested Charlie. "A real 
evening on the town." 

"As it turned out," laughed Elena, "we 
had reservations at three different places. 
We were going to outdo ourselves. Only 
what did we do? We stopped at a neigh- 
borhood restaurant, ordered some spare- 
ribs to go, came home, took off our shoes, 
and curled up on the couch to enjoy our 
ribs." 

Whether it's the night of a seventh wed- 
ding anniversary, or just an ordinary eve- 
ning, the lights of the little house on the 
gay, cozy street shine with happiness. For 
good cheer and love live inside — and love 
doesn't call for a big production. 





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83 




omewhere 
I'll find him 



By BELLE JONES 



IT WAS almost seven o'clock. In the big apart- 
ment building that backed on my little garden, 
lights were twinkling on and I could see move- 
ment in kitchen and dining-room windows — maids 
moving around, mostly, because the apartment 
my boss, Verne Massey, had found for me was in 
one of the more expensive neighborhoods of New 
York. That was one reason it never seemed quite 
like home. With the way the living room opened 
onto its garden, and with one or two small things 
I'd brought from back home, I could sometimes 
make myself think it was homelike enough. But 
at other timies it didn't take much to bring tears 
of lonely homesickness to my eyes — times when I 
let myself admit how empty my existence was 
without Lorenzo. This could be one of those bad 
times, if I let it. Times when the longing for 
Lorenzo was almost unbearable. . . . 

No! Turning my back on those cosy scenes 
across the way, I busied myself in the kitchen and 
when my dinner was ready I set myself a place 
at the small table before the fireplace. There was 
even a centerpiece of violets to cheer me up — 
violets Verne had brought back to the office for 
me after lunch. I was just finishing my coffee when 
the doorbell chimed. It was Verne Massey who 
smiled down at me when I opened the door — a 
smile that faded at once into worried reproof. 

"Belle Jones, how often have I told you to ask 
who it is before opening your door? My dear, 
your small-town hospitality is out of place here 
in New York. May I come in for a moment?" 

"Of course, Verne." I closed the door behind 
him and guiltily put the chain on. Verne put 
aside his hat and shook his head at me. 

"That's like locking the stable door after the 
horse is stolen." He really looked concerned. 



"But the horse is still here, Verne! I mean — 
nothing has happened to me." 

"But something might." Verne looked at me 
reproachfully. "I wish you'd give up this whole 
apartment idea and come up to Westchester like 
a sensible girl. Rhoda and I have so much room 
in that house, and I felt so much more secure 
when you were with us." 

I sighed. Verne and his sister had done so much 
for me, since I'd come to New York looking 
for Lorenzo. But Verne couldn't see that that 
was precisely why I couldn't accept any more 
from them. Ever since he'd first heard of the 
Joneses, Verne had been doing things for them. It 
was Verne who had found Lorenzo lying near 
death beside the road, that night so many months 
ago, and who had sped him to a New York hospital 
in his car and saved his life. It was Verne who 
had given me strength and encouragement when 
we realized Lorenzo's memory was gone . . . and 
it was Verne who had been beside me ever since 
that dreadful day when the hospital told us Lorenzo 
had somehow found his way past nurses and 
attendants, and disappeared into the vast, crowded 
city as completely as though he'd been swal- 
lowed up. 

Searching for a chance to get off the subject of 
myself, I asked Verne if he'd had dinner. 

"I'll have some of that coffee if you've any to 
spare," he said. 

I passed him the coffee (Continued on page 86) 



Lorenzo Jones, NBC Radio, M-F, 5:30 P.M. EDT, for Fab 
and Colgate Dental Cream. Pictured at right, in their 
original roles, are Karl Weber as Verne Massey, Lucille 
Wall as Belle Jones, Arline Blackburn as Helen Stevens. 



R 

M 

R4 



JUHJ 

If love means anything, then, as surety 




as ive loved, someday a life together would be ours again! 



85 



{Continued frovi page 84) 
and a slice of banana shortcake. He ate 
with appreciation. "I can see why you 
prefer your own cooking to our cook's," he 
said. '"This is wonderful. You really are 
a home-town girl, Belle, aren't you — go- 
ing to all this trouble just for yourself? 
It's not as if — " Verne colored suddenly. 
"Forgive me, that was tactless." 

"Not as if my husband were here to 
fuss over?" I smiled tremulously. "It's all 
right, Verne. It's just what I was remind- 
ing myself before you came in . . . that 
unless I keep thinking Lorenzo may be 
right here with me tomorrow or next 
week or next month . . . unless I keep 
making this little place as much home .as 
our house ever was ... well, I just 
couldn't go on." My eyes stung, and quick- 
ly I covered them with my hand. "That's 
one reason I'd rather be here on my own, 
Verne, sweet as you and Rhoda are to 
want me up in Westchester with you." 

In silence, Verne drained his coffee cup. 
His tanned face, made so distinguished by 
the touches of silver hair at his temples, 
looked grave and sad. I felt regretful that 
he insisted on offering me so much kind- 
ness, for I couldn't accept it all and I al- 
most resented feeling guilty or worrying 
about hurting his feelings. Once or twice, 
lately, I had felt something more . . . 
something that had brushed me with real 
fear. When Rhoda, at lunch the other day, 
had said to me so earnestly, "Never hesi- 
tate to accept Verne's help, Belle dear. I 
can't tell you how happy he is when he 
feels he's doing something to make things 
easier for you." 

I'd said, "Oh, Rhoda — soviething! You 
and Verne have done everything! Why, 
Lorenzo's very life is due to Verne — and 
all the hospital bills I couldn't have paid 
right away, and even the job he gave me 
so I could stay here and keep looking for 
Lorenzo. . . ." 

"You don't know how much Verne would 
do for you if you'd let him." Rhoda's aristo- 
cratic, chiseled features had warmed into 
a gentle smile. "Verne's terribly fond of 
you. So very fond. . . ." 

I'd felt it then ... as though there were 
something behind her words that I couldn't 
grasp. As though she half-wanted me to 
understand — to understand without her 
telling me. 

The memory made me uneasy now as 
we sat together, Verne and I, in the twi- 
light silence. Getting up, I lit the lamps, 
and cleared away the cups. Verne, light- 
ing a cigarette, glanced up with a smile. 
"Are you rushing me off. Belle? Sit down 
for a moment. I really came to ask you 
to do something for me, and I'll go as soon 
as that's done." 

I flushed. "Verne, how can you think 
such a thing! I was only — " 

"Only restless. I understand." His smile 
dimmed. "Your typing job at my office isn't 
keeping you very busy." 

"Busy enough while I'm doing it. It's 
just that . . . well, after work, when I'm 
alone, I get to worrying. There's so much 
I want to do to look for Lorenzo, and I 
feel so helpless. I know the police are 
doing what they can, but — I know he can't 
be far away! I feel it. Sometimes I want 
to run right out into the streets and start 
looking into stores and restaurants and 
houses, anywhere — " 

"That's just what worries Rhoda and 
me," Verne said sharply. "That's hysteria. 
Belle, it's not really like you. You need 
more to take up your time. And I need 
extra help." He reached for a leather 
portfolio which he'd dropped on the couch. 
R "Belle, I'm going to leave you some scripts 
M to read for me. It would be a big help if 
you'd go through them for me, pick out 
anything that seems worth my reading." 



"But your new play is such a great suc- 
cess. How can you worry about that and 
start a new one at the Scime time?" 

Verne laughed. "You don't know much 
about the theatre. Belle. It's like any other 
business. You've got to worry about next 
season as well as this one." 

Timidly I took the official-looking stack 
of manuscripts. ■ "But I'm no play -reader, 
Verne," I objected. "As you say, I don't 
know anything about the theatre — I've 
told you that all along." 

"But you're learning fast, my dear. You 
have a fresh outlook. I think I can make 
good use of your very lack of experience. 
Next time I want to do something fresh, off 
the beaten track." His gray eyes flashed 
with sudden mischief. "Something Helen 
won't like, probably." 

Something Helen wouldn't like? I studied 
Verne, trying to make out his tone. Helen 
Stevens' success as the star of his new 
play gave added brilliance to both their 
careers. I couldn't understand the rela- 
tionship between them — a relationship in 
which sometimes friendliness had the 
upper hand, sometimes a kind of tug of 
war, a clash of wills . . . that was another 
thing Rhoda had mentioned the other 
day: "How are you and Helen getting 
on these days?" As though she'd expected 
we weren't getting on at all well. . . . 

When Verne left, he made me promise 
to put the chain on again. It did give me 
a secure feeling. As Verne often reminded 
me, if my suspicions about Lorenzo's dis- 
appearance were justified — if the gang of 
jewel thieves he'd helped to catch had 
something to do with it — I might be in 
danger myself. Tears caught at my throat 
again. Scripts in hand, I leaned for a mo- 
ment in the doorway that led out to my 
darkened garden. Somewhere out there, 
under these same stars, breathing this 
same springtime fragrance, was Lorenzo. 
Closing my eyes, I prayed with all my 
soul . . Then a sudden chill made me 
shut the door. 

For the first time since I'd worked for 
Verne, I was late getting into the Falstaff 
Theatre next morning. I wanted to peep 
into his office to apologize, but the sound 
of voices sent me to my own desk instead, 
to wait impatiently until his visitor left. 
I could hardly wait to share my excite- 
ment with him. When he put his head out 
of the door and called to me, I jumped up 
with the play scripts in my hand and went 
eagerly into his private office. Helen Stev- 
ens was just shrugging into a short fur 
jacket, getting ready to leave. 

Her glamorous, famous face was almost 
grim, and her pale blue eyes, brilliant be- 
neath the pink-flowered hat, were un- 
friendly as she answered my greeting. 
"Congratulations on your new career," she 
said coldly. "I hear you're a play-reader 
now." 

Perplexedly, I looked at Verne. He 
smiled. "Helen's being difficult. Belle. She's 
on her high horse because she's found a 
play she wants to do and I told her noth- 
ing doing until I got the report from you 
on the stuff I left with you last night." 

"I don't want to do it right this min- 
ute — I just want you to read it! Verne, 
why must you be so unrea — " 

"And I don't want to read it till I've got 
a few of them together, so why must you 
be so unreasonable? Besides, darling, 
knowing you, I know perfectly well it's a 
smart, bright, gay play you've found, with 
a glamorous part in which you can wear 
such clothes as were never seen on land 
or sea." 

"And what's wrong with that? You and 
I have done pretty well so far with just 
that kind of play!" Helen's voice whipped 
round the office like a lash. I half-turned, 
anxious not to get involved until the sparks 
had died down a bit, but Verne said im- 



periously, "No you don't. Belle. Now look,' 
Helen. Leave the business end to me, won't 
you? Granted we have done well, but in 
my judgment what we need now is a 
change of pace. A change of pace." He 
underlined the words. "A role that will 
give you a chance to show another facet 
of your talent." 

"That's beside the point," Helen said 
stormily. "I could understand it if you'd 
had your regular staff read the new 
scripts. They're experienced; they know 
the theatre. But Belle, of all people! Hon- 
estly, Verne, Belle herself is always say- 
ing she doesn't know the wings from the 
overture. What's got into you?" She looked 
at me angrily, and then said in a deliberate 
tone, "As if I didn't know." 

Verne flushed deeply. "Helen, that's the 
most — " 

"I know, I'm sorry." She bit her beau- 
tifully shaped lips. "That was perfectly 
rotten of me. I do apologize." She put a 
hand on my arm. "Belle, dear, forgive me. 
Verne gets me so upset sometimes I'm 
liable to say perfectly frightful things and 
they don't mean a thing. Honestly." 

"It's all right," I said unhappily. "It's 
true, anyway. I don't know anything about 
plays." I put the stack of scripts on Verne's 
desk. All excitement of discovery had gone 
from me. What did I know? That play I'd 
put on top, the one I'd laughed and cried 
over until the early hours of the morning 
— ^how did I know it was a good play? 
"Only I thought maybe you'd read this one, 
Verne. I — I liked it. It was sort of sweet 
and — well, real. Like people you'd 
know . . . this girl, her name is Pegeen — '" 

"Pegeen!" Helen picked it up again and 
read a few lines. "Enter Pegeen, wearing 
a big white apron — " Her voice rose to 
a soft shriek. Jumping up, she clutched 
her purse and made for the door. "Verne 
Massey, if you think for one simple- 
minded second that I — Pegeen, in hig white 
apron! Are you quite mad?" 

There was silence after the door slammed 
behind her. Then Verne's shoulders began 
to move, and he pushed back his chair, 
threw his head back, and laughed till he 
cried. "If that girl isn't better off stage 
than on, I'll — eat the play! Don't look so 
scared. Belle. This is the theatre, remem- 
ber? Helen's a star, and a star is always 
on stage." 

"You mean — she isn't really angry?" 

Verne sobered. "Oh, she's angry. Always 
is when she doesn't get her own way at the 
snap of a finger. But her anger won't affect 
her actions, that's all I mean to say. She 
knows which side her career is buttered 
on." Clearing away some papers, he picked 
up the script Helen had tossed down in 
such disdain. "So you think you've found 
something, eh?" 

"I don't know," I said uncomfortably. 
"I just know I was moved by it. It's ten- 
der and sad and happy — " I began to re- 
member how moved I had been. "I do think 
you ought to read it, Verne!" 

"Read it! Of course I'll read it! Why do 
you think I left these with you?" 

I went back to my typing and around 
eleven Helen called to ask me to meet her 
for lunch. Because of her insistence I 
finally agreed. Since I was with the star. 
Helen Stevens, the headwaiter and the 
people at surrounding tables looked at me 
with as much awe as they accorded Helen 
herself. For the hundredth time I won- 
dered, as I listened to Helen apologizing 
for the morning's scene, what Lorenzo 
would think of my new friends. And the 
answer came with a thrill — he would be 
proud and happy. Lorenzo . . . with his 
quick wit and the charm that won sym- 
pathy and understanding from all who 
knew him. . . . With an effort I brought 
my attention back to Helen. Firmly, I told 



her there was no need to apologize. "Verne 
has explcdned to me about actors and tem- 
perament," I sniiled. "Besides, I think 
you're right. Verne had no right to let 
me read those plays. I'm not equipped 
for it." 

Helen's face clouded. "As far as Verne 
Massey is concerned, you can do no wrong. 
Honestly, Belle. I've never seen him like 
this. He's neglecting his office, he never 
sees his friends . . . he's constantly on the 
phone to that Sergeant Rooney down at 
headquarters in case some derelict they've 
picked up might turn out to be — oh, Belle, 
I'm sorry. I didn't mean it that way." 

I tried to smile. Helen went on in em- 
barrassment, "I only meant he's even will- 
ing to risk annoying the police to help 
you. They — they're still working on it, 
aren't they? On that story you gave them 
about the gang of jewel thieves Lorenzo 
got mixed up with back in your home 
town?" 

"They say they are." I sighed. All along 
they'd said they were. Were they just 
humoring me. like Verne? All that mix- 
ture of fact and fear and conjecture I'd 
poured out . . . Pierre Olivet, the jewel 
thief Lorenzo had done so much to ex- 
pose. The gang that might for all I knew 
be nationwide, international even, and 
that certainly knew of Lorenzo's activities 
. . . and the frightful night when Lorenzo 
disappeared from our home, to turn up 
wounded on the road along which Verne's 
car was speeding to New York. The even 
more frightening disappearance from the 
hospital . . . men lost their memories every 
day. Amnesia, they called it. Could that be 
what was keeping Lorenzo and me apart? 
Or was it really something more sinister 
. . . something to do with that gang . . . ? 

". . . and so," Helen was saying, "the only 
excuse I can niake for myself is that I'm 
not used to doing without Verne. We used 
to see a lot of one another. Belle, before 
you came to town. I'm — extremely fond of 
Verne. I thought he was of me, too." 

"Oh, he is! How can you doubt it, Helen? 
Verne adores you! He thinks you're the 
best actress — " 

"Oh, that." Helen shrugged. "There was a 
time when I thought he might . . ." Her 
eyes narrowed. "I can't help wondering 
just why he's giving you so much time. 
No doubt he doesn't know himself. Men!" 
She shrugged again. "Don't mind me, Belle. 
I know you're utterly devoted to your 
husband, and I honor you for it. Now — 
let's talk of other things." 

We did, but I didn't give them my full 
attention. I was wondering how I had 
managed in the past to avoid the sudden, 
certain knowledge that now stared me in 
the face. Helen was in love with Verne, 
and was feeling lonely and neglected be- 
cause he'd become so absorbed in the 
search for Lorenzo! It was daylight-clear, 
now, that for this reason her temper was 
so short, her nerves so imreliable. And I 
had to do something about it! I owed it 
to them — to Verne and his sister and all 
the friends who'd been so good to me in 
my trouble. Verne, I told myself, was too 
used to working with Helen to see her as 
a woman, apart from their association. 
What could I do to make him break 
through the veil of habit? 

When Verne came in from lunch he 
glanced at my frowning face and said 
briskly, "Here, here, Belle, none of that. 
I don't like that dejected look making 
lines between your eyes. Eyes like yours 
should never — well, never mind. I've got 
a project that will make you sit up." 

I couldn't help laughing. He sounded as 
if I were a kindergartner who might get 
into trouble if she wasn't productively oc- 
cupied every single moment. But Verne 
was quite serious. He had decided that I, 
and I alone, must take on the redecoration 



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of his town house. What an opportunity! 

"That beautiful place? That lovely 
brownstone, Verne, where your sister 
Rhoda asked me to tea one day and was 
so sweet to me, when I first came?" My 
lips parted in pleasure. It was the hand- 
somest old place I'd ever been in, and I 
remembered at the time how Rhoda and 
I had agreed about the old, dingy furnish- 
ings not doing it justice. "But I'm not a 
decorator, Verne. I might — why, I might 
spoil it and spend a lot of money and not 
make it the way you'd want it at all — " 

"Belle, Belle," Verne interrupted, "I'll be 
completely exasperated if you don't stop 
underrating yourself. Don't you know yet 
that you're a woman of uncommon taste 
and sensitivity, and that everyone who 
meets you sees it at once? You've got 
qualities you've never exploited, young 
lady, and I intend to see they're not wasted. 
And that's that." 

Laughing again, I echoed, "All right, 
that's that. But I'm still scared. . . ." Even 
as I protested my thoughts grew busy. 
Taste and sensitivity ... if he admired 
them so much, wouldn't it be the simplest 
thing in the world to show him that Helen 
Stevens had them in full measure? Sup- 
pose I got Helen to help me do the house — 
no, to do it herself, so that from attic to 
cellar it would be the expression of her 
own personality? Verne needn't know till 
it was finished . . . and then, when he 
admired it, I'd tell him whose taste he 
was really admiring. . . . 

I had to leave several calls around town 
before one of my messages finally reached 
Helen. When I heard her voice I found 
myself a little shaky, wondering if she 
would balk at the small deception of 
Verne that I was proposing. To my joy, 
after the first surprise, she was as excited 
as I was. "If you think we can get away 
with it. Belle, of course I'll do it." She 
laughed musically. "Candidly, there've 
been times when I've wondered if you 
weren't — well, putting on a bit of an act 
with Verne. ITie clinging, helpless vine, 
you know, so he'd feel like Atlas himself. 
Belle, I'm abject. A woman who could do 
what you're doing for me is just as simple 
and sweet and honest as a woman can be." 
I started to speak, but she went on, "You've 
taught me a lesson. Belle. I hope I don't 
forget it. There are such things in the 
female world as straightforward fairness. 
Darling, I hope you find your husband 
soon. You deserve happiness if anyone 
does. . . ." 

Between annoyance and a kind of 
amused resignation, I hung up. Verne 
had told me once that actors were some- 



times as irresponsible and mercurial as 
children — down one moment, up the next. 
I couldn't seem to get used to it. I was 
always taking them . . . well, Helen . . . 
much too seriously. 

So began our curious partnership. 
Helen's tastes and my own didn't often 
agree, but that was all right. . . . She was 
almost sure to have better taste than mine. 
Helen Stevens was certain to know better 
than I how to make a town house in New 
York a fittingly handsome setting for a 
man of Verne's stature. And his wife's. . . . 
For there was little doubt in my mind 
that he would be asking Helen to share it 
with him as our plan began to ripen. They 
were so right for each other! 

I had almost forgotten about the play 
when Verne called me in one afternoon 
and told me he'd read it. His gray eyes 
sparkled with excitement. "Belle, I must 
be one of the smartest fnen in this city!" 
he said happily. "I knew you had what it 
took to recognize a good thing! Whether 
it's people or drapery fabrics or plays — " 

"You mean that play I said I liked?" 

"I do indeed! It's marvelous. I sat up 
all last night reading it, and beyond one 
or two spots I haven't a quarrel in the 
world with it. I think it'll make next 
season's biggest success. With Helen Ste- 
vens as Pegeen." 

My smile faded abruptly. "Oh, dear. 
Does she know yet?" 

Verne shook his head. "That's where 
you and I are going to be as clever as two 
hardened connivers, Belle Jones. Between 
us, we're going to win Madame over till 
she wants to do this play. Don't ask me 
how — but we'll do it." 

He began his campaign by taking Helen 
out to the most expensive, exclusive res- 
taurant in town. "The place makes a point 
of its quiet, old-world charm," he told me 
as he set off. "Even Helen would think 
twice before throwing a scene in that 
atmosphere. And while she's sitting there, 
unable to screech or strike me, I'll get her 
to at least agree to read the play." 

"Are you taking a copy with you?" I 
asked, marveling at his optimism. Verne 
nodded. 

"The copy you made on thin paper. It 
makes an inconspicuous bulge." He patted 
his breast pocket. "I can give it to her if 
things look hopeful. If they don't — I'll bide 
my time. Wish me luck!" He went off 
with a mischievous glint in his eye. It 
was another light entirely that I wanted 
her to see in Verne Massey's eyes. ... I 
must help it to come about! Love was too 
precious to go begging. . . . 

Verne had some special guests, Cana- 



R 

M 

88 



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dian friends, coming to the performance 
that evening, and he had asked me to 
come back to the Falstaff after my dinner. 
That was how I happened to be around 
when Helen came storming in. The very 
sound of her footsteps telegraphed her 
anger. I looked up to see her in the office 
doorway, eyes flashing, mouth grim. 

"You certainly have done it, haven't 
you!" she flared at me. "You've taken us 
all in but thoroughly. Simple small-town 
girl indeed! How did you get Verne so 
you can wind him around your little 
finger?" 

"Helen, I don't know what you're talk- 
ing about." Terribly disturbed, I tried to 
control my own anger. 

She waved a manila envelope in my 
face. "This — this thing you call a play? 
Is the writer a friend of yours or some- 
thing? Verne must be right out of his 
mind to think of putting it on. It's rank 
amateur stuff — New York audiences will, 
laugh it off the stage! Does he want to" 
ruin his career and mine as well — all be- 
cause you've bewitched and confused him 
so he doesn't know where he is any more? 
I will not have it! You listen to me, Belle 
Jones — I won't have Verne dancing to 
every tune you play! Neglecting his work 
to help you in this wild goose chase after 
your husband, neglecting his friends — and 
now this! Because you like it, choosing 
this mess of nonsense out of all the won- 
derful, first-class plays he could have for 
the asking!" She was trembling with fury. 
"I will not have it. I wiU not do it!" she 
threw at me. Then she turned and I heard 
her heels clicking angrily toward her 
dressing room. 

I was almost at Helen's dressing-room 
door before I realized she was not alone, she 
was talking to Verne's friend, Peter Wki- 
throp. For a fraction of a second I paused 
— and yet it was in a way the longest pause 
of my life. I heard Helen say sharply, 
"Peter, don't be so perfectly silly! Are 
you trying to tell me she doesn't know? 
Look, dear, I'm a woman, and I know 
what women are capable of — don't tell me 
she doesn't know Verne is head over heels 
in love with her! Know it! — Why, she's 
using it to make him jump through hoops, 
that's how much she knows it!" 

I heard Peter reply unhappily, "Verne's 
just a friend to her. She's so deeply in love 
with her husband she doesn't know other 
men are on earth, not as men. You're un- 
fair — " 

"She's unfair! Belle's unfair, not me! 
Keeping him away from his friends, mak- 
ing him run all her errands with the 
police and what-not, and now this — this 
thing! This so-called play! I tell you she 
wants to be the power behind Verne's 
throne, that's what she's after! She has 
no more hope of finding her husband than 
you have, Peter, and she's lining up Verne 
against the future! If I only knew how she 
did it, I'd. . . ." 

I heard no more. Face flaming, ears 
ringing, I got back to the office and sat 
helplessly as waves of revelation washed 
over me. It couldn't be true. It couldn't! 
Verne ... in love with me? When he 
knew that all my heart and soul were 
dedicated to the search for my husband? 
When he, of all people to whom I'd talked 
so freely, knew that without Lorenzo I 
was only half-alive? 

It was a strange, nightmarish evening. 
I got through it somehow. But behind my 
enforced calm was seething a terrible need 
to rvm away. To leave all this — to get 
away somewhere quiet and comforting 
where none of these people could touch 
me — where I could be myself again, plain 
Belle Jones, and think as myself. Decide 
as myself. . . 

I don't think I was fully aware of the 
outside world until the next morning. 



when I found myself walking down famil- 
iar Main Street, drinking in deep breaths 
of the tree-scented air just as Lorenzo 
and I used to do every springtime. I hadn't 
forgotten the night before, but the details 
were all dim in my mind^the telegram 
to Rhoda and Verne in Westchester so 
that they wouldn't worry, just telling them 
I'd gone away to think something out — the 
quick trip to Grand Central, the sleep 
snatched as we jolted along upstate. Back 
home . . that was where I knew I had to 
go. Where I'd been Mrs. Lorenzo Jones. 
Where life was simple because standards 
were clear and simple. Where I would 
know just what I had to do. 

Eagerly I gazed at familiar landmarks, 
the diner, the Bradford house, oldest in 
town . the small park where Lorenzo 
and I sometimes sat on Sunday afternoons 
on our way home from church, to watch 
the children playing. ... It was almost 
as though once again I weren't walking 
alone. Oh, Fd been right to come here! 
Here Lorenzo was with me! Perhaps here 
was where I ought to stay! Wouldn't it be 
best that way — to give up New York, 
come back here, get away from the new 
pressures and jealous emotions of the 
dynamic people who surrounded me there? 
Get away from Helen's misunderstanding 
. . . and Verne's feeling for me, which even 
in my secret mind I couldn't call love. 

The sun reflected sharply off the win- 
dows of the supermarket as the manager 
rolled up the awning, and I shut my eves 
against the glare. Suddenly, in the dark- 
ened moment, I heard Lorenzo's voice. 
"Belle darling, you're wrong. Go back," 
he said. The words filled my whole being 
with sound that had nothing to do with 
my ears. I heard them in every fibre. 
"Go back to New York. Don't run away. 
Only in New York is there a link with 
me, with my disappearance. Don't let new 
problems drive you away. Life means fac- 
ing new problems, darling. It means grow- 
ing and maturing and learning all the 
time. You can learn to live there. You can 
even learn the answer to the problem of 
Verne, if there is a problem. I trust you, 
I have faith in you. Don't run away from 
life. Go back. Keep searching. Belle. Keep 
searching. Don't let anything make you 
stop." 

You say 1 imagined it? 1 won't argue. 
But my heart and I know I heard Lorenzo's 
voice. And I would heed it. 

Turning, I began the walk back to the 
hotel. It was all true. ... I must and 
could learn to live with all the new prob- 
lems, new people, that life brought me. I 
must keep growing so that when Lorenzo 
and I found each other again I would be 
a better person than the one he'd lost, 
not bitter, fearful, worn out with brooding. 
Why, if Verne was right — if the play was 
good, and if it was produced — there was 
even real work waiting for me in New 
York, a real career to help keep my life 
meaningful while I continued my search. 
I began to walk more briskly; now I was 
in a hurry to get back. Even the shock 
that had driven me away seemed less 
dreadful now, more exaggerated. Verne 
in love with me? No, not love. There was 
no real love unless two shared it, returned 
it to each other. Even if what Helen said 
was the least bit true, I could make Verne 
see that. And when I found Lorenzo again 
we would all be friends, the very best of 
friends. When I found him no matter 

what the others thought, it was when and 
not if. I knew Lorenzo was somewhere in 
the world. If love like ours meant any- 
thing . . . and I knew it meant everything 

. . then as surely as we loved I would 
find him again 



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unfortunate than she anticipated, since it 
throws her once more into contact with her 
former fiance. Gil Whitney. Pursued by 
threats and gossip, Helen is painfully 
aware that Gil's wife Cynthia is deter- 
mined to wreck her career in Hollywood. 
Will Gil be able to help? M-F, 12:30 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

ItOSEMARY When Bill Roberts' new 
paper, the Banner, opened its campaign to 
expose the gambling racket that was grow- 
ing so powerful in Springdale, Bill knew 
he would be running into a fight. But he 
is surprised when he begins to uncover the 
trail that leads directly to a bigger under- 
world operation than he suspected. Will 
Bill persist in spite of the danger to his 
family? M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 

SECOIVD MRS. BVitTOX Another 
aspect of the newspaper business — and a 
most unexpected one — involves Stan and 
Terry Burton as two rival social factions 
decide to spur culture in Dickston with a 
series of summer concerts. What begins as 
a pleasant, unimportant news item takes 
on a very different aspect as Stan's mother, 
unable as always to remain on the side- 
lines, tries to run things her way. M-F, 2 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 

STELLA DALLAS Stella, back in her 
sewing shop while her plans to marry 
Arnold King are postponed during Arn- 
old's convalescence, becomes deeply con- 
cerned over the problem faced by her 
daughter Laurel. Laurel and her wealthy 
husband, Dick Grosvenor, are anxious to 
buy a home of their own to escape the 
domination of Dick's mother, but their ef- 
forts depend on Hanley Eraser, whom 
Stella distrusts. Is Stella's instinct correct? 
M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

THIS IS XORA RRAKE Young 

Grace Sargent has not only involved her- 
self in criminal activities but has led her 
friend, nurse Nora Drake, into grave dan- 
ger through her association with Cass 
Todero. On the point of confessing the 
whole truth about Todero to Nora, Grace 
wavers when the young racketeer agrees 
to turn his back on crime if she will come 
back to him. Does he mean it, or is some- 
thing worse ahead for Grace? M-F, 2:30 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 

WEISDY WARREX Mark's final break- 
down reveals a cruel truth to Wendy — 



that her love for her neurotic, brilliant 
husband may have been the most harmful 
factor in his life. Will she be able to keep 
her own feet on the ground until the time 
comes to re-examine all the events of her 
marriage? And when the time does come, 
will she discover she must face the future 
with hope and determination ... or with 
resignation? M-F. 12 noon EDT, CBS. 

WREX A GMRL MARRIES Even 

though Joan and Han-y Davis have been 
reunited, the deadly trails of evil left on 
their lives by Donald Brady and Claire 
O'Brien cannot be easily erased. Desper- 
ately, Joan continues to fight for the hap- 
piness she and Harry once had, the hap- 
piness she is sure in her heart can be 
regained if their faith and courage can be 
maintained. But will the enemy prove 
unexpectedly and fatallv resourceful? 
M-F, 10:45 A.M. EDT, ABC. 

WOMAX IN MY IIOISE The Car- 
ters are a large family and James and 
Jesse Carter are used to being called on 
to help in almost every kind of problem 
it's possible for children to bring home to 
their parents. It's hard for them to get out 
of the habit, even now when one of the 
children is an eligible bachelor, while an- 
other an independent young wife, and all 
the others more or less grown up. But how 
do the children feel these days about be- 
ing helped? M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

YOUNG DR. M ALONE Elderly Dr. 
Paul Browne regards it as a sickness that 
he cannot forget he once hoped for mar- 
riage between his daughter, Mary, and his 
beloved young friend, Dr. Jerry Malone. 
Under the strain of her pregnancy and her 
apparently dying marriage to writer Ern- 
est Horton, will Mary herself remember 
the time she was so desperately in love 
with Jerry? And what of Jerry himself, 
who seems to have quite forgotten it? 
M-F, 1:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

YOUNG WIDDER BROWN Ellen 
Brown has always feared that her two chil- 
dren might complicate the marriage to 
which she and Dr. Anthony Loring have 
looked forward for so many years. Now 
the crisis faced by her friends, Norine and 
Herbert Temple, confirms Ellen's worst 
fears as the Temples' daughter Sheila cre- 
ates a situation that may wreck several 
lives. Will the Temples' ruined marriage 
affect Ellen? M-F. 4:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



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Faith Breaks The Bank 

||^B (Continued from page 52) 

^ne health and good spirits of our children, 
the love and harmony in our home. We 
are a very religious family. We thank God 
for our blessings, and we pray to Him in 
times of trouble. 

"May God bless you and spare you and 
bring you home safe to me," I said the 
dav George left for the service. 

He was drafted on April 7, 1952. To be 
perfectly frank, he wasn't happy about 
going. He was by temperament a boy who 
loved his home and our community in 
Wantagh, Long Island. 

■■I'll make the best of it," George re- 
assured us. ■■I'll go and get it over with." 
We were proud to hear he had been as- 
signed to the Marines but weren't sur- 
prised. 

Of course, every mother thinks the 
world of her son but I know a lot of people 
agree with me. George has always been 
well liked. He has never said an unkind 
word about anyone and is usually the first 
to defend even a casual acquaintance. 

He is a tall, clean-cut boy, just twenty- 
one now. He enjoys music, the fun of his 
friends, girls, and, particularly, square 
dancing. Yet he's always had a kind of 
maturity. Whenever Georae was driving 
the car, for example, 1 always felt safe. 

As a three-year-old he had announced, 
■■Some day I'm going to be a priest and 
build my church in our back yard." But, as 
he got older, his interest turned to automo- 
biles and airplanes. I well remember the 
crates he nailed together to make an air- 
plane with an old baseball bat for a pro- 
peller. He played in this by the day. As 
he got older, he began building model 
planes and ships and developed a real 
skill in carpentry. 

I knew George to be sensible, but there 
is no mother in the world who feels her 
son is safe when he becomes a soldier. It 
is not the fear of training or living in 
camps. It is the fear of war. 

Greorge didn't tell us when he was pre- 
paring to go overseas. He first wrote his 
older sister, Joan, who is married but lives 
near us. He asked her to break it to my 
husband and me gently. 

■■You know, sooner or later, Georgie's 
outfit is bound to go overseas," she would 
say. 

On October fifteenth of last fall he de- 
parted for Korea. From that day until he 
returned, my life was not the same. I 
tried not to show the fear that preyed on 
my mind. I had my husband and my other 
children and the nursery to think of, to 
keep me occupied. 

V/e have a lovely twelve-room house in 
Wantagh. We got it over eight years ago 
when it was a good buy, but even so we 
couldn't manage it on my husband's in- 
come in the post office. I opened a day 
nursery, for we had room enough in the 
house and three-quarters of an acre of 
land for children to play in. 

It was five years ago that I started the 
day nursery, and my son George was a 
big help. In his workshop, he made screens 
and tables and benches for the nursery. 
For the outside, he built swings and other 
playthmgs. 

So there was never a day that he was 
out of my mind. Always there was some- 
thing to remind me of him: his model boats 
and planes, the grape arbor he had built 
and rebuilt, the garage he hadn't time to 
finish. These things always brought back 
my fear for his welfare. 

The thing I dreaded most, all those days, 
was a telegram. A telegram, when you 
have a son overseas, can be only bad. 



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ing the winter. His letters were pleasant, 
never complaining. But that was his na- 
ture. And I would go on answering the 
door, always apprehensive, then thankful 
to God that there was no bad news. 

It was the last week of March and the 
children were in the house with me when 
the telegram arrived. 

Deeply regret that your son^Pfc George 
F. Hart is missing in action since March 
26, 1953, IN performance of his duty and 
in service of his country. Realizing your 
anxiety but details not available. Letter 
follows. . 

I can't possibly describe my emotion. I 
know I broke down completely. There- 
after my heart cried constantly. 

We prayed to God — all of us, and all of 
our friends. My husband's fellow-workers 
were praying for George. My nieces and 
nephews and all of our relatives held 
masses for George. We prayed that he was 
alive and that he was missing only because 
he had been captured by the enemy, not 
killed. His letters were now returned to 
us unopened and we stopped writing him. 
I think that was bad, too. There was a 
finality to it. 

"What can we give you for Easter?" my 
daughter asked. 

"You can't give me what I want." 

"Now, Mother, tell us what you want." 

The only thing I wanted was Georgie's 
return. 

In the meantime, my nineteen-year-old 
son Russell had been called before the 
draft board. His induction was postponed 
until June of this year in deferment to our 
grief. Then it was on April twenty-second 
that I was on the phone talking to George's 
godmother. And I was crying. 

"I know George is alive," she said. "Let 
me read something to you." And she 
quoted from the Bible: "I have traveled 
many places and seen many things. I 
have suffered by these things and some- 
times faced death by these things but I 
have conquered by the grace of God." 

I prayed with her over the phone. 

Three nights later I was sitting on the 
sofa, watching Douglas Edwards report 
the news on TV. Fifteen more American 
prisoners had been released and he began 
to read off their names. I was tense, and 
he was through the fifth name and the 
tenth. As he read off the twelfth name, I 
clasped my hands and prayed, "Oh, God, 
let him say Georgie's name." 

Edwards said, "Marine Pfc. George 
Francis Hart." 

I fell to my knees and thanked God. 



That was the happiest day in the life of 
my husband and myself. We had been 
given back our son. Shortly afterwards 
we had a telegram from General Mark 
Clark confirming George's return as a 
prisoner of war: 

I join in your prayers of thanksgiving 

THAT YOUR SON PfC GeORGE F. HaRT HAS 
RETURNED FROM THE ENEMY AND WILL SOON 
BE WITH YOU. 

The next night George was on the phone 
from Tokyo. 

"I'm all in one piece, Mom," he said. 
"Don't worry." 

I broke down. He told me he had been 
dreaming of my strawberry shortcakes. 1 
told him I would have three for him. Then 
his father and brother and sisters talked 
to him on the phone. 

I think it was sometime in the next week, 
when we were a lot calmer, that we 
thought of writing Break The Bank. We 
were thinking it would be wonderful if 
we could get some money for George so 
he would have a good start as a civilian. 
We asked for tickets for my husband, 
daughter and myself. We got them for 
Monday, May fourth. On Sunday, the 
third, George arrived at Mitchel Air Base 
in New York. 

There were sixty of us, relatives and 
friends, to meet him. George came off 
the plane on a stretcher, wearing blue 
hospital pajamas. He was all grins and 
smiles at being home. 

We went to the hospital with him. He 
had been hit by bullets in the hand and 
one leg, and shrapnel in the back, but he 
was going to be all right. 

And, after he had told us all, we told 
him about our going on Break "The Bank, 
hoping to be contestants cind win some 
money for him. He was very sweet about 
that but as sensible as ever. He would not 
have been disappointed if we had won only 
ten dollars. 

Well, we were picked out of the studio 
audience for the show. I think everyone 
there wanted that for us, when they heard 
about George. We were three, Marilyn, 
my husband and I, to be quizzed. 

Bud Collyer said, "In these troubled 
times, people turn to the Good Book for 
guidance and comfort, Mrs. Hart, and so 
our questions will mostly be taken from 
the Bible." 

I know that we got the answers to the 
questions among the three of us, but my 
husband and I were so nervous that our 
fifteen-year-old had to speak for us. We 
answered three questions that day. 



I 




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"You have thirty dollars," Bud Collyer 
;aid, "but our time has run out. Will you 
;ome back tomorrow?" 

Of course we would. 

The next day in the studio there was 
jn extra surprise for us. They had sent 
1 mobile TV unit to George's hospital bed, 
ind we could see him on the TV screen as 
ne saw us. Now we had to make good for 
nim! 

We answered more questions on the Bi- 
ble, and then we were waiting for the bank 
question — for $8,550! 

"Here are stirring words of guidance 
from one of the first four books of the New 
Testament," Bud said. '" 'Greater love hath 
no man than this, that a man lay down 
his life for his friends.' " 

The passage we knew well and answered, 



"The Gospel of St. John." 

The whole studio broke into cheers and 
we could see George's friends in the ward 
surrounding his bed, congratulating him. 

I have never known such excitement. I 
have never known of any family that has 
been more fortunate than ours. 

Georgie is very grateful. He is going to 
bank the money until he gets out of the 
service and knows what he will do. 

Our home is joyous, but even so there is 
a sad note — for, with Georgia's return, we 
have had letters from other mothers whose 
sons are missing. They want to know if our 
George knew their sons or saw them alive. 
I know how they are suffering. I have 
written them that I will pray for their sons 
as I prayed for George. It was faith in 
God that brought us our great happiness. 



Garry Moore — Be True to Yourself 



(Continued jroni page 33) 
says Durward Kirby, "is that we're friends 
here. All the corny things people are re- 
luctant to talk about are present in this 
show: loyalty, dignity, understanding. 
That's the way Garry makes it." 

Ken Carson says ditto, Denise backs it 
up, and so do the producer and director, 
the boys in the orchestra and the wardrobe 
mistress. Garry himself, no victim of 
false modesty, owns up that things run 
smoothly on the show. 

He is the first to admit that he didn't 
learn about loyalty and dignity through 
perversity and bad luck. The rags-to- 
riches story isn't his, for Garry's parents 
were very well oflf. In show business, he 
has never suffered as the stooge of a 
prima donna, for since he ^was nineteen 
he has starred or co-starred on every 
show. With the exception of one summer, 
he hasn't been out of work in nineteen 
years. 

Garry's afternoon show is now one of the 
most successful in all of TV, and one of 
the reasons is that Garry believes in hu- 
man dignity, and respects the fragile bit 
that is sometimes called ego or self- 
respect. 

"That was one of the things my father 
taught me," Garry says. "That, and to 
know yourself and to be honest." 

Denise Lor says she would remember 
Garry even if he hadn't hired her. Audi- 
tioning for radio and TV jobs had been a 
frightful experience. She'd walk into a 
studio and stand by a microphone, while 
the people doing the hiring sat in a black- 
paneled glass room. They could see her, 
but she couldn't see them. 

"It was like being in a strange room," 
she says, "knowing that people are star- 
ing at you out of secret peepholes." 

She auditioned in the same type of 
studio for the Moore show. However, be- 
fore she sang, a man came out of the 
black booth. 

"I'm Garry Moore," he introduced him- 
self. "I'm sorry we have to listen to you 
in this kind of set-up, but unfortunately 
there's no other way. Just take your time, 
and don't be nervous." 

Afterwards, Garry came out again, 
thanked Denise and explained that, when 
they finally made up their minds about 
whom they would hire, and when and 
how, they would let her know. A little 
thing, but important to Denise for, being 
at ease, she sang well enough to get the 
job. 

Then Ken Carson has a story to tell. 
He had worked with Garry in Chicago 
and California. He was invited to come 
East and work on the new video program. 

Ken had done some TV in California but 
not in the grand way Garry's variety show 
is staged. 



"I was nervous and scared," Ken re- 
members. "I didn't sound good and I 
knew it. And I wasn't that way for just 
a day or week, but for three months." 

Ken found it difficult to get used to 
having the booms follow him around, to 
walking away from one camera and in- 
to another, to acting as well as singing. 

"It's a new experience for all of us," 
Garry told him. "It'll work out. You'll 
see." 

Ken smiles about it now. "Most people 
in Garry's position would have said, 'Look, 
son, if you can't improve pronto, we'll get 
someone else.' " 

No one has ever asked a member of 
Garry's show to lie across railroad tracks 
for him — but, if they were asked, they'd 
likely take the dive. Even the girls in his 
office sing of I'amour for Moore. He is 
always giving them extra time off. A 
pregnant secretary was told to take it easy, 
come in late and leave early. He offered 
to call in his own doctor for consultation 
when one of the girls' mothers took seri- 
ously ill. 

Garry, himself, remembers the one sum- 
mer he needed a friend. There isn't really 
anything unusual about laying off during 
the hot months in show business, but for 
Garry, at the time, it was a shock. He 
had been co-starring with Jimmy Durante 
for five years. He was in the big time. 

The contract read that both men got 
equal billing, and one week they would 
be introduced as the Durante-Moore Show 
and the next week it was Moore-Durante. 
Plus that, Garry was doing most of the 
writing for the show. 

"But I'm a realist," Garry says. "I knew 
that Durante was so big that I had to get 
out to cut my own niche as a personality." 

So Garry decided to quit. Jimmy was 
reluctant but understanding — he once had 
done the same thing. But the producer 
didn't like it. The sponsor didn't like it. 
But quit Garry did. 

"My agent was as bright and optimistic 
as the July sun," Garry recalls. "He said 
sponsors would break down my door 
pleading for my services." 

Garry left his door wide open that sum- 
mer and the only thing that came in was 
an occasional evening breeze. 

"I was depressed," he says. "I was be- 
ginning to wonder whether I belonged in 
show business at all." 

He drove over to Durante's home. 
"Sometimes I think all the radio stations 
have gone out of business," Garry told 
Jimmy. "Then I turn on my set and it 
seems as if everyone is working except 
me. I'm afraid they've got something I 
haven't." 

Jimmy did his best to convince Garry 
that the exact opposite was true — that Garry 
had something the others didn't have — and 



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his confidence went far in helping Garry 
to conquer his career problems. 

"Jimmy is one of the greatest comics of 
all times, yet the greatest lesson he has 
to teach is in humility." Garry goes on: 
"Humility is the modest sense of one's 
own significance. When a person has that, 
you can bet he's aware of others' problems 
and handicaps." 

The way Garry sees it, people are, at 
times, a little intolerant. 

"You wouldn't get irritated if an amputee 
couldn't keep up with you," he says, "but 
you might blow up just because someone 
is grouchy. There is usually a reason just 
as real to account for bad humor." 

Denise insists that Garry can read minds. 
She has come to a rehearsal upset by ill- 
ness in her family. Garry seems to be 
right in tune with her brain waves and is 
over to discuss it and help with a solution. 
If, on the other hand, she is worried about 
her singing, he is likely, at the right mo- 
ment, to say, "I was looking at some film 
clips of you, Denise. Gee, you look and 
sound wonderful." 

Another of Garry's characteristics is his 
directness. He's star of the TV panel 
show, I've Got A Secret— but Garry him- 
self hasn't got any. 

Everyone in the cast is always kept in- 
formed of the exact business status of 
the show. Last October, for example, he 
was told that CBS was thinking seriously 
of replacing his afternoon program with a 
giveaway show. Garry was asked to emcee 
it and he turned the job down. 

He got the cast together and said, "Look, 
kids, don't buy any yachts this week." 
Then he told them the whole story. 

Garry was completely honest. After all, 
the loss would be primarily his. For four- 
teen years, he had been trying to build just 
the kind of show he has. He didn't want 
to emcee a quiz, giveaway, night-time va- 
riety or comedy show. He wanted his show 
"as is." He had failed in the attempt to 
build the show before, and he might fail 
again, but he didn't want to give up easily. 
Garry didn't say all these things, because 
he wasn't trying to twang heartstrings. 
What he did tell the cast was that things 
looked bad and they were free to get other 
work before the ship foundered under 
them. 

"No one left," he said. "Now, that is 
the kind of loyalty that goes with real 
friendship." 

Of course, Garry told the TV audience 
a little about his sponsor troubles, too. 
The audience is in on much of the busi- 
ness' end of the show. He can't help being 



honest and, for this reason, he's occasion- 
ally on the spot. 

Garry sometimes has an open forum on 
his show in which the audience is free to 
ask questions of the cast. 

A woman asked one day, "Why did you 
stop emceeing Take It Or Leave It?" 

"I was fired," Garry said. Later he told 
a friend. "You know, that didn't really 
hurt me — and suppose there was someone 
watching the show who had lost a job that 
week? Imagine how much better he felt 
to know it can happen to anyone." 

Garry's an even-tempered man. In all 
the years he has worked with his friends, 
he has never raised his voice. 

"When some emcees get into rehearsal," 
Durward says, with customary humor, 
"you can see smoke coming out of their 
. ears, nose and mouth." 

But Garry, whether he feels good or 
bad, remains soft-spoken, and he intrudes 
as little as possible in the work of the 
cast. Ken and Denise pick their own songs 
and, if they want to try something a little 
different, Garry encourages them. Ken 
says, "I've been told by others, 'If you're 
going to try something new, do it on your 
own time.' " 

This doesn't mean that Garry never 
criticizes the cast and doesn't run the 
show. It's all in the Moore touch, the way 
he goes about it. And it's always good for 
the person involved, as well as for the 
show. He intrudes seldom, because he 
has faith in the cast. 

"But there's another side to it. Look at 
the burden that puts on their shoulders," 
he says. "Each one knows he is personally 
responsible for his success or failure." 

That, of course, is what everyone wants 
and Garry knows it. People who have 
studied and trained and worked their way 
up in show business like to be treated as 
a team, not a dog act. And, for this, the 
Moore cast is grateful. 

"Look, it's true that we get along well," 
Garry says. "I don't lose my temper. I'm 
not tough on others. But I'm no tin god, 
either. I'm not perfect, and I know that 
and know my own frailties. We endure 
what we must and improve what we can." 
He takes a deep breath and says, "This is 
the way my father taught me, eind this is 
the way Shakespeare said it: 

" 'This above all: to thine own self 

be true. 
And it must follow, as the night the 

day, 
Thou canst not then be false to any 
man.' " 



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Teens Are a Time to Learn 



{Continued jrom page 60) 
sightseeing guide on Times Square. He 
sells tickets to the busses, sometimes guides 
the tours. Times Square being the heart of 
New York's theatrical district, he knows 
most of the theatre greats— each and 
every one of whom he approached, implor- 
ing them (a proud man, too, is Irish- 
American Edward Walsh) to give his tal- 
ented youngster a chance. This went on 
for two patient but never discouraged 
years. Everyone listened, everyone was 
"interested," but everyone was too busy 
until John Ross — an old friend, also in 
show business — listened, was interested, 
was busy, but not too busy. . . . 

John Ross had faith in Joey, faith in the 
stripling !ad for whom he gave up his 
other interests, all of them (and so, his 
income, too) . John Ross devoted all his 
time to coaching and developing and, sub- 
sequently, to selling the talent he. too, 
believed was there. 

"When I started out with Joey, people 
thought I was out of my mind," John Ross 
says. "If I had to coach talent, people 
said, why did I have to take an inex- 
perienced unknown? I "had to' because 
the instant we met, we took a very strong 
liking to each other. Also, Joey's face im- 
pressed me, his strange, unusual face, and 
his quietness and his respect. We worked 
together, just the two of us, for almost a 
year. Then, realizing that Joey needed an 
audience and that the only way for him to 
get an audience was to make the rounds 
of the amateur nights, we made the rovmds 
from Jersey to Westchester and back again. 
Joey danced and also worked out a couple 
of sketches with the emcees. Joey's real 
debut, his 'opening night' on television, 
was in September of 1949, when he ap- 
peared in "The Family Genius' — in which, 
as Joey tells it, 'I played the family 
idiot!' Since then, Joey has appeared on 
almost a show a week, including, among 
many others: the Philco Playhouse, Studio 
One, Mr. I. Magination, Big Town, the 
Frank Sinatra show. We The People, Big 
Story, the Jack Haley show. Suspense, 
Danger, The Web, Kraft Television Thea- 
tre — about 138 appearances in all. His 
dramatic portrayals have encompassed 
every type of role from Shakespeare to 
young toughs. But the moment the lights 
dim, he's simply Joey — a nice kid," says 
John Ross, who ought to know, "to have 
around." 

Joey is a serious-minded boy, soft- 
spoken and mannerly, but he is far from 
being an all-work-and-no-play longhair. 
As befits a youngster born and raised on 
New York's East Side, he can use his 
dukes (but he doesn't try to prove it), is 
completely at home on a baseball diamond, 
a football field, or in a swimming pool. 
He can wrestle his two older brothers, 
Edward and Charles, and is a dancing fool 
and a boy who has a completely masculine 
point of view on dates. 

"I went with a girl, went steady," Joey 
says, "for about two and a half years." 

But Joey doesn't like to talk about it. 

"I think you can be pretty serious at 
thirteen," young Joey, now fifteen, says 
seriously. "Not the full seriousness, may- 
be, but you can get to like a girl an awful 
lot. I did like this girl an awful lot. Enough 
to get hurt. No lasting hurt, though, be- 
cause" — a grin twisted Joey's sensitive, 
tragi-comic young face, "there'll always be 
another girl. Not right now, though. I'm 
still going through the reflection period, 
thinking back on it; feeling pretty good 
about it, too, because I feel I learned a lot 
from it. I know for sure that next time 
I'll take my time! 

"Meantime, I'm going out with different 



girls on different dates. Take my date 
with Pat O'Neill. Pat was a one-time date 
for the prom we have at our school, P.C.S. 
(Professional Children's School, where 
Joey is a freshman) , which was held at the 
Hotel Plaza. It was a one-date thing 
because — well, because Pat has a boy 
friend. It was a formal date, too, me 
in my tux and Pat in a red dress with a 
hoop skirt thing. I went out to her house 
to call for her and met her folks and 
hailed a cab. All real proper and Park 
Avenue. At the Plaza, we danced. We did 
a little jitterbug. A little rhumba. A little 
samba. A little mamba. The Charleston, 
too. And we waltzed. Between dances we 
drank punch — no, not spiked. None of the 
girls in my class smoke but, sure, they 
take a drink — Cokes," Joey laughs, "ginger- 
ale, Seven-Up. We order our drinks 'on 
the rocks.' 

"After the prom at the Plaza, we went 
to the Copacabana. Most of us, including 
me, had never been to the Copa before 
so it was a kick. Jack Carter was there 
that night. He recognized me (made me 
feel real 'Mr. Big!') and started kidding 
us fellows about our tuxes: 'Have to get 
'em back, don't you,' he called over, "by 
eight o'clock in the morning?'" 

Joey's very first date — before the steady, 
the two-and-a-half-year steady date be- 
gan — was with a girl he met when he 
first went to P.C.S. , three and a half years 
ago. Of this date Joey said, in reminiscent 
vein: 

"I had this one girl I liked a lot. She 
used to sit next to me and help me with 
my homework. Used to call me every 
night, too, and 'hear my lessons' over the 
phone. The first time we went out, which 
was the first time I went out with any 
girl, I took her to an amusement park. 
We rode the roller-coaster and ate pop- 
corn but spent most of our time at the 
shooting-gallery. I love shooting-galleries 
more than anything! 

"I remember that I took one of my dates 
to see 'The Man,' in which I alternated 
playing a part with Josh White, Jr. — he 
played the role for two weeks, that is, 
and I played it the rest of the Broadway 
run. Some fellows would think, Man, this 
is a crazy, mixed-up way for a guy to 
impress his girl by taking her to see an- 
other guy in his play! 

"A little snack after the theatre is fun, 
too. Mostly I take my dates to the Stage 
Delicatessen on Seventh Avenue, where 
all the TV and theatre folks hang out. 
Milton Berle, for instance — " (Uncle Miltie 
is, by the way, a great fan of Joey's) "and 
all the ball players hang out there, too. 
Rizzuto," Joey said, as if relishing each 
syllable of the great shortstop's name, 
"Yogi Berra, and all. . . ." 

Now and then Joey likes to give a little 
party, four or five girls, for a Sunday 
afternoon at, say, The Bandbox: 

"The last time we went to The Bandbox, 
Buddy Rich was there and 'Go, Buddy,' we 
yelled our lungs out, 'go, boy, go, man, 
go!' He's a great drummer," said Joey, 
looking wistful — he can only play the 
piano. 

Joey and his gang seldom if ever date 
at the bebop joints in the Village but Joey 
can tjdk bebop and tell bebop jokes, and 
does. 

'Do you know," Joey inquires, "who the 
first hepcat was?" 

"No " 

"Theodore Roosevelt. He was the first 
to yell 'Dig that Panama Canal!' 

"Then there's the one about the bebop 
and his girl in the park. A fire engine 
goes by with sirens screaming and the 
bebop yells, 'Darling, they're playing our 




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song!' " He has other stories, too. 

To the question, "When you date a girl, 
do you expect her to kiss you good night?" 
Joey said, "Yes, usually. All depends on 
w^here you leave her off; whether or not 
she's standing near to you — see what I 
mean? Yes, usually it's done. But, if not, 
no hard feelings!" 

One of the perils of dating is, Joey con- 
fides, that if you meet a new girl and don't 
make any headway, "The kids kid you for 
five weeks after!" In order to make head- 
way you've got to have a smooth line and, 
although Joey's line is smooth enough for 
maybe, he feels, Marilyn Monroe, it some- 
how leaves him dangling. . . . 

"I used to say to a girl I'd just met, 
'You remind me of someone I used to 
know; someone I liked very much.' Now 
that sounds real sincere, doesn't it? They 
don't think so. They say, 'I've heard that 
one so often it sounds like a stuck record.' 
So I scrapped that one. Now I say 'You're 
one of the cutest girls I ever met.' I put 
my heart in it. Only, instead, it's my foot. 
'I know,' they say, 'I've heard that one. be- 
fore.' Or 'Bet you pull that line,' they say, 
'on every girl.' 'No, it's true,' I insist, 'you're 
getting me all wrong.' Anything I say to 
them, it's the same — they've always 'heard 
that one before,' or they 'bet' I pull that 
line on every girl I meet. Now I've pulled 
in my line and settled," Joey says, "for 
a good, plain old honest 'Hi!' It's going 
pretty good." 

Joey's taste in girls, like his taste in 
places to date, is simple, also varied. A 
girl, to rate with Joey, doesn't have to be 
beautiful. He says so. She doesn't have 
to be any one particular type, either. Ex- 
cept very feminine. 

"I like the girls best when I see them 
in those full skirts," said Joey. "I think 
those are very becoming. I don't like 



girls in dungarees at all — especially with 
their fathers' shirts hanging down to their 
knees. A girl dressed like that, if you 
don't look close, you think it's another 
boy you're with! Some of them walk 
around with a man's hat on, too, and an 
old overcoat. Soon they'll be wearing Army 
boots. . . . My mom wears those full skirts, 
dresses real feminine, I guess that's why 
I like girls that way," Joey says. 

"Personality is the thing, though — if 
that's no good, it's no sense. A certain 
goodness about a girl," Joey adds, thought- 
fully, "is what I like best of all, I guess. 
And of course every kid, when he goes 
to the movies and sees Elizabeth Taylor, 
hopes that he'll get a wife like that. 

" 'Now that's what I want,' the kids say, 
'a girl like that.' That's all they want?" 
Joey inquires of outer space. 

Joey thinks that when he is of marrying 
age he would like to marry an actress. 
"Someone who understands my business," 
he says, "so that we can both go home and 
talk the same language. To speak the 
language would be, I should think, the 
most important way to make a happy mar- 
riage. But until I'm of marrying age I 
want to date and be friends with all kinds 
of girls, just as in my work I — well, I like 
anything I can get work at — the theatre, 
the movies, television." 

And there you have him — Joey, the boy, 
who lives at home on New York's East 
Side, devoted to Mom and Dad; grateful, 
too: "When I wanted to be an actor at the 
age of eleven. Dad helped make it possible 
for me to become one." Joey, the actor, 
who makes use of every experience, never 
regrets an experience, even a hurtful one. 
because somehow he knows that only by 
experience can you learn to interpret life 
as truly, as deeply as — in his teens — Joey 
interprets it on radio and television, on 
stage and screen. 



Meta's Guiding Light 



{Continued from page 63) 
both . . . the one named Ellen Demming 
Thompson — Mrs. Hal Thompson — who lives 
and laughs with her in their own charm- 
ing home . . . and the one called Meta 
Bauer Roberts — Mrs. Joe Roberts — who 
lives in that big cabinet in the corner of 
the Thompson living room. 

Ellen Demming herself feels as if she 
had lived on a television screen for a good 
portion of her life, because she was in TV 
in the early experimental days (on Sta- 
tion WRGB) in Schenectady, New York, 
the town in which she was born and 
brought up. 

Meta Roberts, in The Guiding Light, is 
the first continuing dramatic role she has 
ever played. Ellen admires the woman she 
portrays, grows more interested in her 
every day. She thinks the cast and all who 
work with her are tops. 

"Although most of them were already 
on the program when I joined it, they never 
treated me as a newcomer," she says. 
"They made me one of them, right from 
the beginning. Ted Corday, the director, 
was wonderful — kind and patient. What 
extraordinary patience that man has with 
everyone! The producer, David Lesan, 
couldn't be finer to work with. And the 
cast — well, they're all just swell. That 
goes for the crew, too. You. never saw a 
nicer set of people." 

Ellen is a fairly tall girl — five feet seven 
— with a good figure and a tiny waist. Her 
brown hair is touched with gold lights, 
her hazel eyes are set wide apart and have 
a soft and velvety quality, like her voice. 
That distinctive, low-pitched voice, now so 
familiar to listeners, is her natural one. 



except that the microphone seems to em- 
phasize its throatiness and the soft drawl. 
Many persons ask her what part of the 
South she hails from, and they can hardly 
believe she's an up-state New Yorker and 
that it's her husband, Hal, who hails from 
Georgia. 

Hal was an actor when he and Ellen 
met, as co-stars in the Green Hills sum- 
mer theatre at Reading, Pennsylvania. It 
was Ellen's fourth season of summer stock, 
most of it on the New England coast, and 
Hal's first. "Claudia" was the play that 
brought them together, and they've been 
very fond of the girl in the title ever since. 
The year was 1946. Hal had come out of 
the Army, which he entered from college 
and in which he served five years. Theatre 
interested him, and he did some night-club 
emceeing, then took the acting job as a 
means of learning what went on behind the 
scenes of show business. 

Ellen, of course, had been a professional 
actress since those early television days 
She had gone to Stephens College, in Mis- 
souri, to continue her study under the 
famous actress, Maude Adams, who was 
then the head of the drama department 
there. She had served a summer appentice- 
ship at the Mohawk Drama Festival dur- 
ing Charles Coburn's last season there 
And she had a season with the Clare Tree 
Major Children's Theatre, a touring group 
of talented young actors which was led 
by Mrs. Major. "I was twenty the sum- 
mer I was with Mrs. Major and it was a 
thrilling year. She made me company 
manager — which amazed me — and which 
meant I did a little of everything, from 
managing the company and acting to 



hoisting scenery and driving the truck." 

Both Miss Adams and Mrs. Major had 
wanted her to change her name from 
Ellen Weber (she had already dropped her 
first name, Betty, and was using only 
her middle name, Ellen) . Demming was her 
great-grandmother's name and both wom- 
en thought it would look better on a theatre 
program. 

Ellen's name takes on special interest 
because of something that happened right 
after Hal met her and began to think 
seriously of marriage — which seems to 
have been not later than five minutes 
after they were introduced! Almost im- 
mediately, he began to speak of her a great 
deal to his family, and his mother asked 
if Ellen Demming was a stage name or her 
real one. "I had to admit that I didn't 
know," Hal says, and he laughs as he 
remembers his own confusion. "I could 
only say, "Well, that's her name, the only 
one I know.' It had happened so fast to 
both of us. Ellen assumed I knew all about 
her, I guess, and I knew that what I al- 
ready knew was enough to make me 
know that she was the only girl for me." 

It had happened fast. In six weeks, Ellen 
and Hal were formally engaged. Then they 
begged off for the rest of the stock-com- 
pany season so they could meet each 
other's families and plan a wedding in 
New York, where they were married on 
September 14, 1946. 

It was a lovely wedding, and everything 
went beautifully, except that they had no 
apartment. It was the time of the most 
acute housing shortage, and they had to 
settle for a heatless, cold-water flat in 
the Hell's Kitchen section of New York 
City. They shared a bathroom with other 
tenants. Hal's first birthday present to his 
bride was a portable canvas bathtub. 

Fortunately, by the time Erica was born, 
the Thompsons had settled down in the 
charming apartment in which they pres- 
ently Uve, in one of New York's big gar- 
den developments, where there is a play- 
ground, and a sandbox for Erica to dig in, 
a pool for splashing about on hot days, and 
lots of grass and trees. 

Perhaps because they waited so long 
for it, their present home has a rather 
special feeling of comfortable living, of 
quiet and of peace. The living-room walls 
are a soft shade of deep green, restful and 
cool. Ellen designed the stunning high 
cabinet and shelves which dominate one 
wall, and Hal made it to her specifications, 
with the help of their friend Peter Birch, 
painting the wood to match the wall. A 
deep sofa, in gold-colored fabric, faces the 
television set, on which stands a glazed 
jardiniere with big white leaves forming 
a huge bouquet against the background of 
green wall. There are comfortable chairs 
and convenient tables. The rugs are beige 
cotton pile. Lamps and ornaments make 
the room look lived-in and add bright 
color notes here and there. The adjoining 
dining portion forms an L to the living 
room and is furnished with dark green 
wrought-iron table and chairs. 

Their home is a restful background for 
two busy grownups and one extremely 
busy little girl who has to keep up with 
all her picture books, besides taking care 
of her extensive family of dolls, and still 
find time for all her little playmates. Part 
of Erica's summer is being spent on a 
farm — where her cousins on her daddy's 
side live — and there will be a visit to 
Ellen's family in Schenectady. 

"If I didn't have such a fine maid, who 
loves Erica, I couldn't possibly leave her 
as I do for rehearsals and broadcasts," 
Ellen explains, looking serious. "But I do 
think that it's a good idea for every wife 
and mother to have some outside interests. 
I just happened to be an actress who 
I wanted to continue my work, but if I 



weren't doing that I would try to find 
something else which would be stimulating 
and bring me home to my family with 
more to give than when I left. It wouldn't 
have to be paid work. It could be com- 
munity work, following a hobby, or pro- 
moting a cause that does good." 

Actually, Erica gets little chance to miss 
her mother, because there are so many 
hours when they can be together. Ellen's 
are mid-day programs and she is home 
quite early. She and Hal have most of 
their evenings free, except when she does 
something special, like a dramatic tele- 
vision show at night. 

She was doing an ingenue role on the 
Robert Montgomery program when she got 
her chance to play Meta Roberts — and al- 
most missed it. Jan Miner had recom- 
mended Ellen to both the producer and 
the director of The Guiding Light, but it 
was generally felt that Ellen looked too 
young for the part. "I don't know whether 
any of the powers-that-be on Guiding 
Light saw me that Monday night doing an 
ingenue role on the Montgomery tele- 
vision show, but I hoped they wouldn't. 
I was supposed to look young and I had 
worn my hair down, very girlishly. It 
was the day after that telecast that I was 
supposed to read for the role of Meta. 

"What a transformation I tried to make! 
I slicked my hair up, under my most 
sophisticated hat, and chose a tailored suit, 
and did a complete turnabout from the 
ingenues I'd been playing. I got the part. 

"Each day I feel closer to Meta. I think 
that now I look more mature when I'm 
playing her, because I think of her as an 
emotionally mature woman, secure in her 
overcoming of many difficulties. I admire 
her, knowing that another woman less 
strong than she might have grown more 
frivolous and unstable during the period 
when she was going through such grave 
ordeals. I have been proud of the poise 
she has gained, and of her ability now to 
help others who are confused and un- 
happy. Like her step-daughter, Kathy, for 
instance, for whom she has such tender- 
ness and compassion." 

How interesting and real Meta is to 
other women, as well as to Ellen, is fre- 
quently demonstrated by incidents like a 
recent one. Ellen was shopping at her 
neighborhood grocery and a woman recog- 
nized her. "You're Meta," she said. "On 
Guiding Light." Her face brightened. "It's 
wonderful to bump into you today of all 
days, because I had to miss the program 
and I have wondered what happened." 

Ellen filled in the day's events, and that 
led to a discussion of Kathy and her 
problems. "You know," the woman told 
Ellen, "I have a mixed-up daughter my- 
self, so much like Kathy, and it helps me 
greatly to see how you help Kathy. It 
makes me understand my own child bet- 
ter, and I am really grateful to you." 

Hal Thompson is apt to smile a little 
indulgently at the diversity of names by 
which his wife has been known. He puts 
it this way: "When the telephone rings, 
and I answer it, and it's for my wife, I 
can always tell from exactly which part 
of her life the caller comes. If a voice 
asks for Betty, then I know it's someone 
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97 



(Continued from page 47) 
picture on the fronts of the trolley cars all 
over Philadelphia. Once again, Eddie and 
Joey took stock. They were making ten 
dollars a week, apiece, by then. 

"Your picture," said Joey, "is aU over 
the trolley cars. Right?" 

"Right." 

"It's got lipstick all over it, right?" 

"Right." 

"So you're popular, you should get more 
money." 

(Eddie's appeal was more romantic than 
Joey's. Joey was — and is — a fine comic; 
he got the laughs, while Eddie reaped the 
sighs.) 

"You should get even more money than 
I should get," Eddie said loyally. They 
Alphonse-and-Gaston-ed themselves back 
into the big shot's office, and emerged with 
eighteen dollars a week apiece. 

Upon which they shook hands solemnly. 
Men of distinction, captains of industry, 
empire builders, financial wizards. Wasn't 
a girl in town they couldn't take for an 
ice-cream soda. It was good to be alive. 

The bond between these two is deep, 
and they don't go around talking of how 
they feel, but you sense it. When Eddie 
came to the Paramount this past spring, 
Joey was on the bill — his first Broadway 
appearance. When Eddie's got a sore mus- 
cle, Joey's there, massaging it. When 
Joey has a disappointment, Eddie bleeds. 

Back in those Philadelphia days, before 
either boy hit the big time, life was a lot 
more easygoing. They remember Sunday 
afternoons, going to the ball game, with 
Eddie's father, and second-guessing the 
managers all the way home afterward, and 
the big Sunday meal, and the fine Sunday 
laziness. 

But, at seventeen, Eddie came to New 
York. A song-plugger, visiting Philadel- 
phia, had suggested Eddie to a bandleader 
named Buddy Morrow. Morrow listened, 
liked, hired. From Morrow, Eddie went 
to Charlie Ventura's band. Neither job 
lasted long. The experience was undoubt- 
edly good for him, but Eddie didn't like 
singing with bands. "You had to sing 
what they wanted how they wanted it." 

He was in the big city now, though, and 
he wanted to stay. So why not aim for a 
top spot? he asked himself. He'd audi- 
tion for the Copacabana. 

The year was 1947, the man at the head 
of the Copa was Monte Proser. There's 
been some publicity to the effect that 
Eddie sang four notes, Proser beamed, 
held up his hand, and cried, "Sign here." 
Actually — "I sang six songs, and Proser 
said there was some kind of a law that I 
had to be eighteen before I could work 
there, so I went to work at Grossinger's." 

Grossinger's is a famous resort hotel in 
the Catskill Mountains, and it was there 
that Eddie first met a man named Milton 
Blackstone, who is in charge of public 
relations for the place (and who now is 
also Eddie's manager). 

The minute he turned eighteen, Eddie 
marched himself back to the Copa, and 
joined the show there. 

The engagement at the Copa gave him 
some of his sweetest memories. Once he 
followed a whole bunch of stars, on a 
special celebrity night, and he was scared 
stiff to come out. Yet, when he started 
singing, the whole place got still, you 
couldn't even hear the ice clinking in the 
glasses. And, when it was over, there was 
Frank Sinatra, the idol of Eddie's child- 

R hood, winking, and doing a mock swoon 

1^ and crying, "Oooh, Eddie — " 

And once his mother and father got in 
from Philadelphia to see him — "and they 

98 



Eddie Fisher's Life Story 

actually sat at a table with Dick Powell and 
June AUyson — " 

In 1949, Eddie spent a morning talking to 
Bob Weitman, then manager of the Para- 
mount Theatre. "It was always my am- 
bition to sing at the Paramount," he said. 
"I'd work for you for nothing." 

He very nearly did. Weitman hired him 
at seventy-five dollars a week to sing, 
during intermissions. An organ would 
play, and Eddie'd sing two numbers with 
it. 

Labor Day, 1949, he was back at Gross- 
inger's, and there was a benefit program, 
with Eddie Cantor headlining. Cantor 
heard young Eddie sing one song, an- 
nounced to the audience, "This boy goes 
with me on my tour," told Eddie, "Go 
home and pack," and they were off — to 
Omaha, Louisville, all over the country. 

Cantor was with Eddie when he made 
his first Victor record. Eddie finished his 
song, the red recording light went off, 
and the whole orchestra got up and clap- 
ped. They were seasoned musicians, they'd 
heard lots of vocalists, they weren't easily 
thrilled, but they stood there applauding, 
and Eddie Fisher stood there wanting to 
cry, and Eddie Cantor stood there mut- 
tering, "I haven't seen anything like it 
in twenty years." • 

New Year's Eve of 1950, Bill Miller, who 
owns the Riviera, a night club right across 
the George Washington Bridge in Jersey, 
was having a private party. He wanted 
a singer, and asked if Eddie'd oblige. Eddie 
went to Milton Blackstone. "Yes?" 

"Yes," Blackstone said. "You never can 
tell what a little thing like that will lead 
to." 

For several months, that "little thing" led 
to nothing. Eddie did spot appearances 
around town. Then Fran Warren, who 
was supposed to open at the Riviera, got 
sick. Bill Miller, remembering Eddie, 
called Blackstone. "Can Eddie go on in 
twenty-four hours?" 

"Yes," said Blackstone. 

"No," said Eddie. 

"Eddie," said Blackstone, "this is the 
chance of a lifetime." 

"I'm not ready," Eddie said. "I haven't 
even got a tuxedo." He grinned at his 
manager. "And, besides, I'm scared to 
death." 

They brought him a tuxedo, rehearsed 
him for an hour, gave him a mighty shove, 
and Eddie Fisher, knees knocking, went 
out on the floor at the Riviera and killed 
the people. Next day, he was a star. 

His more recent story's better known. 
Two years in the Army, singing for troops 
in Europe and Korea, singing to aid the 
recruiting program, the blood plasma pro- 
gram, the defense bond program, singing 
to raise money to fight cancer and polio and 
muscular dystrophy, breaking attendance 
records everywhere he went. 

A letter from Special Services Headquar- 
ters reported that Eddie was "a credit to 
the U. S. Army . . . his untiring efforts in 
entertaining the combat forces were ap- 
preciated and lauded by all who came in 
contact with him." 

Eddie himself said, "I feel only humility 
for honors I've received — the fighting men 
deserve them more — " 

The humility is real, not assumed. Out 
of the Army now, on top of the world, 
freshly through with his triumph at the 
Paramount, followed by another triumph 
at England's Palladium, with brand-new 
shows for Coca-Cola on both television 
and radio, his records selling furiously 
("Any Time" has passed the million mark), 
Eddie's still so far from big-headed that 
it's almost hard to figure. 

Backstage at the Paramount, the phone 



rang constantly. Eddie was doing six 
shows a day, yet if the caller happened to 
be a kid from a hospital — or anyone he 
felt needed cheering up — not Joey, not 
George Bennett, his public relations man- 
ager, not the United States Marines, could 
keep Eddie from grabbing the phone. 

"If you don't rest between shows you 
won't have any throat left," the doctor said. 
Eddie went right on talking. 

One of the fans who got up to Eddie's 
dressing-room at the Paramotmt was a 
little English girl. His Palladixmi opening 
was set for May 11, and the little girl was 
planning to be home in London on the 
thirteenth. 

"Will you come to the show there?" 
Eddie asked her. 

"I wrote to my mother," she said. "And 
my sister and my aunt. They can't get 
tickets; the Palladium's sold out both 
weeks." 

"Call me up when I get there," Eddie 
said. "I'll take care of it." 

"You can't," said the little girl. "The 
place is sold out." 

"Yes, I can," Eddie said. "You call me." 

The little girl's eyes widened. "Who do 
you know?" 

Another example of Eddie's and his 
fans' interlocking loyalty was displayed 
one rainy Saturday afternoon while he 
was still at the Paramount. That day, Ed- 
die and George Bennett had their first and 
only verbal tussle. 

The way it began, bobby-soxers were 
lined up in the street under Eddie's dress- 
ing-room window. The rain and the 
wind blew around them; the cold was the 
kind that gets into your bones, for all that 
it was spring in New York. The kids were 
calling for Eddie, and Eddie got nervous. 
"They're liable to catch cold," he said. 

"What can you do?" said George. 

Eddie opened the window, leaned out. 
argued with the kids for ten minutes. 
"Please go home," he yelled down. "You're 
going to catch cold." 

George yanked him in. "What about you? 
Because your legs are inside, you can't get 
a sniffle in your head?" 

"Listen," said Eddie, "if they think 
enough of me to stand out there, I'm go- 
ing to take care of them." 

"There's a room called the rehearsal hall 
up one flight from the dressing-rooms, 
and in two minutes Eddie was on the 
phone to the Paramount's manager. He 
had the rehearsal hall cleared, and then 
he had every kid in the street brought up 

The backstage elevator at the Para- 
mount's built to hold eight people. Per- 
formers, musicians, agents, everybody has 
to use it, so there's enough traffic on it 
without any added strain. 

Which didn't bother Eddie. Eight at 
a time the kids were ferried up and 
guided into the rehearsal hall, and Eddie, 
still in his bathrobe, talked to them. "If 
you'll wait till I finish the next show, I'll 
be back, answer any questions, autograph 
your books — " 

Seven o'clock that night, his head started 
swimming. George got the doctor,, the 
doctor shot Eddie full of penicillin and 
Vitamin C, and while he — ^Eddie — was 
lying there sneezing, George asked. "You 
sure there's nothing you want to jump up 
and do for anybody this minute?" 

His boy laughed. But, if he'd had it 
to do over again, he'd have done it over 
again. 

He's got a voice, sure. But he's got 
more than that. He's got a warmth, a 
genuine affection for people, a rare kind 
of simplicity. His voice made him a star. 
The other things will keep him one. 




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SEPTEMBER, 1953 RADIO-TV MIRROR 



VOL. 40, NO. 4 



Contents 



Southwest Edition 



Ann Higginbotham, Editor Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Ellen Taussig, Associate Editor Joan Clarke, Art Assistant 

Betty Mills, West Coast Editor 



Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chief 



people on the air 



Martha Rountree of Meet The Press 3 

What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 4 

Bill Ring 19 

Dotty Mack — Waiting for Love 

How to Be a Good Host by Sherman Billingsley 

Looking Homeward (Warren Hull) by Florence Hull Reef 

It's a Grand Young Life! (Julius La Rosa) by Chris Kane 

Cinderella Sis Camp by Anne Haynes 

The Phrase That Pays for Red Benson by Martin Cohen 

Search For Tomorrow (short-short story based on the dramatic serial) 

From Wallflower to Orchid (Kathryn Murray) by Gregory Merwin 

Two For The Money. by Sibyl Lange 

I Found A Wonderful Man (Galen Drake) by Anne Drake 

The Right To Happiness (complete episode in pictures) 62 

Johnny Dugan — Ladies' Choice r— by Pauline Swanson 66 

"My Secret of Happiness" (Spring Byington) by Betty Goode 68 

"We're Living Happily Ever After!" (Martha Tilton) ....by Elsa Molina 70 
Rosemary (full-length novelette)..'. by Rosemary Roberts 74 



features in full color 



"We're All Pulling Together" (Barbara Britton)....by Elizabeth Mills 46 

Stella Dallas — Exciting Lady (Anne Elstner) by Gladys Hall 48 

Our Little Margie Says: "I'm in Love with Four Guys"....by Gale Storm 52 

Man about the House (Karl Weber) by Frances Kish 54 



your local station 

Man about Beale Street (WDIA) 6 

Just Beginning ( WBGS) 8 

The Man from Music Mountain (WSB-AM & TV) 11 

"The Long and Short of It" (NBC) 26 



inside radio and TV 

Daytime Diary 16 

Information Booth 25 

Inside Radio (program listings) 79 

Cover portrait of Julius La Rosa by Ozzie Sweet 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Macfadden Publcatlons, Inc., New 

York, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE. ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 

205 East 42nd Street. New York, N. Y. Editorial Branch 
Offices: 321 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif., and 
221 North La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. -Harold A. Wise. 
Chainnan of the Board: Irving S. Manhetmer, president; 
Fred R Sammis, Vice President; Meyer Dworkin. Secretary 
and Treasurer. Advertising offices also in Chicago and San 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS: 6 weeks' notice essential. When pos- 
sible, please furnish stencil impression address from a re- 
cent issue. Address changes can be made only if you send us 
your old as well as your new address. Write to Radio-TV 
Mirror. 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 
MANUSCRIPTS: All manuscripts will be carefully considered. 
Member of The TRUE 



but publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damag:e. Itt| 
is advisable to keep a duplicate copy for your records. Only^ 
those manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self-addressed 
return envelopes or with sufficient return postage will be 
returned. 

FOREIGN editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, 
N. Y. Irving S. Manheimer, President; Douglas Locichart, 
Vice President. 

Re-entered as Second Class Matter, Oct. 5, 195 1 , at the 
Post Office at New York. N. Y.. under the Act of March 3, 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail. P.O. Dept., Ottawa, 
Ont.. Canada. Copyright 1953 by Macfadden Publications. Inc. 
All rights reserved under International Copyright Convention. 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tion. Todos derechos reservados segiin La Convenci6n Pan- 
Americana de Propiedad Literaria y Artistica. Title trademark 
registered in U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Co. 
STOKY Women's Group 




i 



Martha Rountree 



VERSATILITY and vitality symbolize 
the amazing person that is Martha 
Rountree. As busy as she is 
pretty, Martha, together with Law- 
rence Spivak, is co-owner and co- 
producer of the prize-winning public 
affairs program Meet The Press, which 
is heard and seen weekly on NBC 
radio and TV. Also to her proud 
credit is The Big Issue (also known 
as Keep Posted) and the long-popular 
Leave It To The Girls. 

A Southerner at heart — born in 
Florida and educated in South Caro- 
lina — Martha's avid interest in poli- 
tics is not accidental. Her family set- 
tled in America in the early Colonial 
days, and she inherited from them the 
desire to maintain the liberties for 
which they worked and fought. How- 
ever, Martha's kinship with national 
affairs didn't blossom right away. She 
christened her career as a newspaper 
reporter, then worked in a New York 
advertising agency, programmed a 
local radio station, worked on a trade 
paper, wrote stories for popular mag- 
azines, and was roving editor on the 
"American Mercury." She also man- 
aged to be president of her own com- 
pany, Radio House. 

Then, one fortunate day in 1944, 
Martha met Lawrence Spivak, who 
was editor of "American Mercury" at 
the time. He asked Martha to write 
an article on the women's vote in the 
Presidential election. During ensuing 
conversations, they hit upon the idea 
for Meet The Press. 

Since then, Martha's life has been 
more bustling than ever. In order to 
keep her many business enterprises 
on an even keel, Martha commutes 
weekly between New York and Wash- 
ington. And, since 1952, she has also 
managed to be happily married to 
Oliver Presbrey, a well-known ad- 
vertising executive. 

On the social side, Martha is one of 
the most popular hostesses in Wash- 
ington. And, in between all her goings 
and comings, she still finds time to 
help many institutions — such as the 
Girls' Club of America, and the Wom- 
en's National Press Club. 

Definitely a wonder woman! The 
South has every right to be burstingly 
proud of Martha Rountree, as do 
women all over the land — men, too. 

Martha Rountree is moderator of Meet 
The Press— on NBC-TV, Sun., 6 P. M. EDT 
—on NBC Radio, Sun., 10:30 P.M. EDT. 




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JILL 

WARREN 




Recent marital news has been "nnoke up" as well as "break up," so friends are still hoping for a 
reconciliation between Donald and Gwen O'Connor — pictured with daughter Donna in happier days. 



NBC has re-signed Margaret Tru- 
man for nine guest appearances on 
both radio and TV during the 1953-54 
season. This will be the third year that 
Margaret has been with the network, 
and there is a possibility that within a 
few months she also will have her own 
show. Most critics have agreed that she 
has improved tremendously since her 
first try at television, and even Milton 
Berle will say that she can ad lib with 



the best of them. Miss T. is said to be 
getting $4000 per television and $2500 
per radio appearance. . . . Beginning 
August 31, Perry Como's CBS tele- 
vision show will be heard on radio also, 
via the Mutual network, Monday, Wed- 
nesday and Friday nights. . . . 3-City 
By-Line is the name of a new fifteen- 
minute program which is heard on 
ABC Radio, Tuesday and Friday nights. 
It features three of the nation's out- 



standing syndicated columnists — Hy 
Gardner, Irving Kupcinet, and Sheila 
Graham — presenting intimate reports 
on glamour happenings in the East, 
Middle West, and on the Pacific Coast. 
Gardner reports Broadway news from 
New York, Kupcinet covers the enter- 
tainment scene from Chicago, and 
Sheila Graham handles the Hollywood 
doings. ... If you've missed Stop The 
Music on television, you'll probably like 





Good news for Your Show Of Show fens — Imogene Coca 
and Sid Caesar will be back this fall, despite the rumors. 



TV show coming up for Jo Stafford, long a favorite on 
radio — whether in solos or duets with guest Bob Crosby. 




Congrats from Arlene Dahl for William P. Marcum — the 
26,000,000th member of Blue Shield Medical Care Plans! 



the musical TV quiz called Name That 
Tune, which is on NBC Monday eve- 
ning. The program is created, produced 
and conducted by Harry Salter, and 
features quizmaster Red Benson and 
vocalist Vicki Mills. There are cash 
prizes for studio contestants as well 
as home viewers. ... A new tele- 
vision series produced by the TV- 
Radio Workshop of the Ford Founda- 
tion will be (Continued on page 12) 




For Margaret Truman, a new contract, and her own show? M 



Nat Williams of Memphis adds deejaying to his many other talents over Station WDIA. 




/vlan about Beale Street 



NAT Williams, WDIA's popular 
deejay, was a familiar figure 
on Beale Street before he started 
working for the station. He brought 
with him a rich humor and down- 
to-earth philosophy which make 
him a friend to everyone. Although 
Nat doesn't consider entertaining 
his first vocation, his popularity on 
the three shows he does for WDIA 
indicates that his listeners certainly 
think otherwise. 

Show business claimed Nat as far 
back as his school and college days 




during the latter part of the twen- 
ties. He had a great talent for pro- 
ducing and writing plays, and could 
have continued this as a career aft- 
er graduation (with honors) from 
Tennessee A. and I. University. 
But, instead of pursuing a theat- 
rical career, Nat took a job as news 
editor on the New York State Con- 
tender. In 1930, he returned to 
Memphis to combine his two ca- 
reers as writer for a local paper and 
teacher of social science at Booker 
T. Washington High School. 




Nat Interviews the famous "Granddoddy of the Blues" — W. C. Handy. 



Nat-the-showman came to the 
fore again in 1935, when he organ- 
ized a Negro amateur show called 
Amateur Night On Beale Street. 
War came along, and Nat ended 
the amateur nights (after ten 
years) to take an active part in the 
nation's war effort as a public rela- 
tions man in the Office of War In- 
formation. 

Once the war was over, Nat re- 
turned to Memphis, where he 
picked up his career teaching 
school and writing for a local pa- 
per. It wasn't until 1948 that Nat 
joined WDIA with his afternoon 
Tan Town Jamboree. He admits 
that his first day scared him half to 
death, since he'd never tried being 
a disc jockey before. But he broke 
out his infectious laugh and the 
first thing you know he was a real» 
favorite throughout Memphis. ff 

The station added Tan Town 
Coffee Club to Nat's schedule and, 
on Sunday, he's back at the mike 
again for Brown America Speaks — 
one of the first Negro forum pro- 
grams and the recipient of two na- ^ 
tional awards. 5t 

Nat's most devoted fans are his 
wife Lucille and his two little pre- 
school-aged daughters, Natolyn 
and Naomi. But plenty of other 
people love Nat, too. He's the most 
popular man on Beale Street. 



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Sally learns the art of spinning discs from a past master, Atlanta's popular Jimmy Harper. 




For housewife Sally Bennett ^ a new career is 



JUST BEGINNING 



THOUGH, to most housewives, running a home 
and keeping a husband happy is more than 
a full-time job, at least one homebody has 
decided to emerge from the sink-and-skillet set 
and try a new career. That the girl is pint- 
sized Sally Bennett and the new career is radio 
disc-jockeying comes as no real surprise to any 
of her friends in Atlanta, Georgia — where she's 
heard every day over WBGS — or in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, her home town. 

It's no shock, either, to Sally's sales manager 
husband, Paul, who's gotten used by now to 
Sally's talent for always having a finger in more 
than one pie at a time. A former secretary, 
singer, song writer and model, Sally's many- 
faceted personality comes out at home, too, 
where she's as good with a tricky piece of 
needlepoint as she is with an apple pie. Says 
Paiil with real admiration, "She's a very versa- 
tile young lady." 

That's the opinion, too, of veteran discer 
Jimmy Harper, who's training Sally in her 
record-spinning chores on his show. Together 
they talk over records, and sing and play Sally's 
own songs. The fans have accepted the viva- 
cious, blonde disc-jockey-in-training with so 
much warmth that SaHy and Jimmy are hope- 
fully planning several new shows together. 

Meanwhile, Sally works hard, and pays close 
attention to the advice of her two favorite 
critics — friend Jimmy and husband Paul. She's 
just beginning, but both predict she'll go a long, 
long way. 




At home, she reloxes in an informal Eorly American setting. 



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Atlanta's Zeke Clements takes life easy. 



The Man from 
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PLAIN as bread," that's how one of his friends 
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as the singing, strumming Man From Music Mountain. 

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his wife Helen have no more pretense about them 
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songs, which he can reel off endlessly at the drop of a 
ten-gallon hat. It's his pet boast that he knows enough 
songs to do his TV show (four songs a day) for a whole 
year without repeating a song or learning a new one. 

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Zeke and Helen get out-of-doors every 
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(Continued from page 5) 
introduced on NBC in September. Tenta- 
tively titled Junior Omnibus, the program 
will, in many ways, parallel the Workshop's 
present Omnibus. The new show is sched- 
uled to be telecast for twenty-six weeks 
beginning early in September, on Sunday 
afternoons. It will be directed to the in- 
terests of young people from eight to six- 
teen years of age, and will cover the fields 
of science, sports, art, career-building and 
government. 

Arthur Godfrey was much saddened by 
the death of his surgeon. Dr. Marius N. 
Smith -Petersen, who passed away a few 
weeks ago at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital in Boston. Dr. Smith-Petersen 
(Godfrey had nicknamed him "Smith- 
Pete") collapsed of a heart condition a few 
days after Godfrey's operation, Godfrey 
being the last patient he treated before his 
death. The surgeon's passing will not af- 
fect Godfrey's recovery, the hospital an- 
nounced, because "a very able team of 
orthopedic surgeons which worked with 
Dr. Smith-Petersen will continue the 
treatment." From what is known at this 
time, Arthur may not have to undergo a 
second operation on his hip and may even 
be back at work, if only part-time, as you 
read this. 



Thi 



That 



Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca will defi- 
nitely return to Your Show of Shows when 
it goes back on television September 5. 
However, the over-all make-up of the 
program will be changed considerably. Max 
Liebman, producer-director of the show, 
says: "We are going from format to no 
format at all, and the show's set-up will 
be so unpredictable that not even I will 
know what it will be like from one week 
to the next." Sid and Imogene both vaca- 




Good news: Jack Webb, Dragnet's star- 
director, has reconciled with his wife. 



Coast to Coast 




Contrary to some reports, opero star 
James Melton Is far from being retired. 



tioned in Hollywood this summer, but de- 
cided against doing their long-talked of 
co-starring movie, because they didn't find 
the right story, nor was there enough time 
to complete a film before they were due 
back in New York. 

Singer Johnny Johnston, of The Ken 
Murray show, and his wife Shirley are ex- 
pecting their first baby in November. Also 
on the stork's to-be-delivered list are Mr. 
and Mrs. Herb Shriner, who are scheduled 
for a bundle in December. 

The Donald O'Connors were finally di- 
vorced a few weeks ago in Los Angeles. 
Mrs. O'Connor won custody of their daugh- 
ter. Donna, aged 6, and Don was given an 
Irish wolfhound named O'Flyrm. Don and 
his wife, Gwen Carter, were teen-age 
sweethearts and were married in 1944. In 
California, divorces are not final for a 
year, so pals are hoping that the O'Connor 
family may even yet reconcile between 
now and 1954. 

Comedienne Martha Raye and her man- 
ager-husband Nick Condos also wound up 
in the divorce court 'in Miami, Florida, 
with Martha winning her freedom. 

When The Hit Parade comes back on 
the air in the middle of September, Gisele 
MacKenzie will share the feminine vocal 
honors with Dorothy Collins. She has been 
signed to replace June Valli, who left 
the program to try her luck on her own. 

Remember Fay Wray, the former star of 
the movies? She is coming out of semi- 
retirement this fall to appear with dancer 
Paul Hartman in a new TV situation-com- 
edy series called Life Of The Family, on 
ABC. 

Congratulations to the John Larkins 
(she's Terry Keane), who recently cele- 
brated their third wedding anniversary. 

Jo Stafford's contemplated TV show for 
CBS is jvist about set and should be on 
the air early this fall. Carroll Carroll, one 



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J 



What's New from Coast 




Jo Stafford (here with husband Paul Weston) will soon be seen on CBS-TV. 



of the best-known writers in radio and 
television, has been signed to handle the 
script. 

So sad about the death of Barbara Brit- 
ton's infant son. The baby died from res- 
piratory failure when it was two days old. 
Barbara and her husband, Dr. Eugene 
Czukor, have two other children. 

Jack Webb, the star-director of Dragnet, 
and his wife, actress Julie London, have 
reconciled after a trial separation. 

Dale Evans recently presented a check 
for $5,G0O to the National Association for 
Retarded Children. The money represented 
the first royalties on her book, "Angel 
Unaware." It is a factual story about 
Dale's and Roy Rogers' little girl, Robin 
Elizabeth, who was handicapped from birth 
and died last year at the age of two. Dale 
wrote the book to help promote under- 
standing of the problems of retarded chil- 
dren. 

Country Washburne, the musical con- 
ductor of Curt Massey Time, was elected 
the honorary fire chief of Tarzana, Cali- 
fornia. But, according to Country, he only 
won because "votes from foreign countries 
counted five and an awful lot of my 
friends from Texas voted." 

Following their smash performances on 
the 50th Anniversary Ford Television ex- 
travaganza, Ethel Merman and Mary Mar- 
tin are both being deluged by video offers. 
NBC seems to have the inside track on 
getting them for a show, either together 
or separately. 

Mulling the Mail 

Mrs. A. T. G., Kansas City, Missouri: 
Yes, color television is definitely on the 
agenda of things to come and has not been 
abandoned. To the contrary, NBC is ready 
to go on the air with color as soon as 



the Federal Communications Commission 
gives its approval. . . . Mrs. R. A. M., Bur- 
bank, California: Breakfast In Hollywood 
was the radio show which was done for so 
long by the late Tom Breneman. Interest 
has been revived in the program recently, 
with NBC preparing a film on it in the 
hopes of bringing it back to television. . . . 
Mr. J. Y., Ft. Wayne, Indiana: Yes, you're 
right. Karen Chandler, who has done 
guest appearances on several radio shows, 
was not actually an "overnight" success, 
even though her record "Hold Me, Thrill 
Me, Kiss Me," was a fast hit. You are cor- 
rect in saying that she was around a long 
time as Eve Young and sang with several 
bands, including Benny Goodman's and 
Joe Reichman's. Same girl, same voice, so 
maybe changing her name did the trick 
.... Mrs. V. W., Bridgeport, Connecticut: 
Alan Bunce has played Albert on Ethel 
And Albert for a long time, but actually 
is the second Albert since the program 
first went network in 1944. The original 
Albert was Richard, Widmark, who played 
the part for six months before he went on 
the Broadway stage. . . . Miss L. M., 
Chicago, Illinois: No, Julius LaRosa is not 
engaged and, to the best of my knowledge, 
does not even go steady with any one 
girl. . . . Miss D. J. H., Cincinnati, Ohio: 
Sorry, but I cannot print home addresses 
or phone numbers of radio personali- 
ties. . . . Miss C. T., Omaha, Nebraska: 
Snooky Lanson, Bess Myerson and Dorothy 
Collins are all married; Marion Marlowe 
and Frank Parker are not married, but 
are good friends. . . . The Glee Club, San 
Antonio, Texas: CBS still owns the show, 
Songs For Sale, but Jan Murray has not 
been doing much radio or television re- 
cently. He has been making night-club and 
theatre appearances throughout the coun- 
try. 



to Coast 



Vt halever Happened To . . .? 

James Melton, the well-known Metro- 
politan Opera tenor who has sung on many, 
many programs? Melton has not retired, 
as many readers thought, although he has 
made few appearances on the air in the 
past year or so. He recently played an 
engagement at the Thunderbird night club 
in Las Vegas and is booked for other clubs 
around the country. 

Barry Wood, who was a popular baritone 
on radio and records several years ago? 
Barry gave up the performing side of show 
business to go into the creative, production 
end of television. He recently was the 
executive producer of the Kate Smith 
Show and has just been given a new job 
with a title of "color coordinator" for 
NBC, working on long-range color tele- 
vision programming projects. 

Clayton Moore, who played the part of 
the Lone Ranger on television? I have 
checked repeatedly and have been unable 
to find out any information on Moore. 
Possibly one of our readers knows of his 
present whereabouts. If so. do write in. 



These are some of the personalities 
readers have inquired about. If you have 
wondered what happened to one of your 
favorite people on radio or television, 
drop me a line — Miss Jill Warren, Radio- 
TV-Mirror Magazine, 205 E. 42nd Street, 
New York City 17. New York— and I'll try 
my best to find out for you and put the 
information in the column. Unfortunately, 
we don't have space to answer all the 
questions, so I try to cover those personali- 
ties about whom we receive the most in- 
quiries. Sorry, on personal answers. 
(NOTE: On all shows, both radio and 
television, be sure to check your local 
papers for tim.e, station and channel.) 





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16 




AUNT JEXIVY The names of the people 
in Aunt Jenny's stories may be unfamiliar, 
but the people themselves might be living 
right down the block, for everyday dramas 
just like theirs are being lived out in towns 
across the country. Aunt Jenny's town 
happens to be called Littleton, but her 
stories of love and misunderstanding, of 
courage and fulfillment, are really the 
stories of any Main Street, U.S.A. M-F, 
12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BACKSTAGE WiFE Recognizing that 
the backing of Roy Shepherd is dangerous 
to the welfare of Larry's show, Mary Noble 
hopes that her friendship with wealthy 
Lucius Brooks may offer a possibility of 
buying out Shepherd's interest. But the 
keen acting instinct that has made Larry a 
success on Broadway makes him certain 
that Lucius Brooks is not what he appears. 
What is Lucius Brooks really after? M-F, 
4 P.M. EDT, 'NBC. 

BRIGHTEit DAY There seems little 
hope for young Alan Butler as the town 
daily becomes more certain of his guilt in 
the death of Elmer Davidson. Young Patty 
Dennis, who loves Alan, knows that she has 
all the faith and strength of her minister- 
father in her fight to learn the truth, but 
will even the Reverend Richard Dennis's 
experience and instinct be able to cut 
through the tangle of misunderstanding 
and misrepresentation? M-F, 2:45 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

DOCTOR'S WIFE The last thing a young 
doctor wants is a reputation as a trouble- 
making eccentric. Julie doesn't feel that 
she and her husband. Dr. Dan Palmer, de- 
serve such a reputation, but the town al- 
most seems to feel otherwise during their 
championship of the young ex-convict in 
whom they have decided to put their trust. 
Could the Palmers possibly be wrong? 
M-F, 5:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

FitONT PAGE FARRELL David Far- 
rell, ace crime reporter, strikes one of the 
queerest stories of his career when he is 
sent to cover the story of the death of a 
lazy man. Could an honest man have lived 
so well without apparent income? With 
the help of his wife Sally, David investi- 
gates every detail of the victim's life and 
arrives at the key to the secret when he 
realizes that it takes more than physical 
strength to commit murder. M-F, 5:15 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

GlJiDING EIGHT The long strain over 
Kathy eases as she slowly, regains her 
physical and mental health after the near- 
tragedy of her child's birth. Her marriage 
to young Dick Grant approaches greater 
stability as another marriage undergoes its 



most serious trial. What will happen to 
Bill and Bertha Bauer with the collapse of 
Bill's business venture? How will the crisis 
intensify their emotional differences? M-F, 
1:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. M-F, 12:45 P.M. 
EDT, CBS-TV. 

UMLETOP HOUSE The tragic aftermath 
of the accident that killed Reed Nixon's 
adopted daughter looms heavily over Julie 
Paterno as Reed at last realizes he, too, is 
doomed. Is he wise to refuse to go ahead 
with his marriage to Julie? Fighting des- 
perately to keep him from renouncing his 
last bit of happiness, Julie cannot face the 
future as bravely as she would like to. 
Suddenly, it seems very dark, very mys- 
terious. M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

Jl7Sr PEAIN BIEE Bill Davidson's ef- 
forts to patch up the marriage of Ernest 
and Alice Wolfe become increasingly diffi- 
cult as wealthy Irene Hemingway, who 
first started out to break up the marriage 
in a spirit of revenge, decides she is really 
in love with Ernest. Is Ernest seriously 
tempted by Irene's fortune? Can Bill con- 
vince him of the tragic possibilities of a 
life founded on another person's heart- 
break? M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

LIFE CAN BE BEAVTIFVE Chichi 
Conrad has never been able to overcome 
her habit of trying to help other people, 
even though there have been times when 
she wasn't thanked for it. But an unex- 
pected bonus comes to Chichi when she 
tries to find happiness for Grace Garcine, 
the girl with the misguided love life. When 
Craig Roberts's brother Mac becomes a 
factor in the situation, Chichi's life takes 
an important new turn. M-F, 3 P.M. EDT. 
NBC. 

M.ORENZO JOXES At last Belle Jones 
has found Lorenzo, only to be faced with 
the shocking fact that her mere presence 
has not been enough to restore his lost 
memory. Miserably unable to recognize 
Belle or recall the past. Lorenzo cannot 
refuse to believe she is his wife. But. in- 
stead of returning to her. he suggests that 
she divorce him and leave him free to 
marry Gail Maddox. Stunned and heart- 
broken. Belle faces tragedy. M-F, 5:30 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

MA PEHKIiVS Events in Rushville Cen- 
ter are given an unexpected twist by the 
teen-age element as, first. Ma's grandson 
Junior Fitz seriously endangers his father 
Willy's job, and then his girl friend be- 
comes an active nuisance to Tom Wells. Is 
Tom wrong to shrug off the fifteen-year- 
old girl's crush on him? I3 it conceivable 
that she can be a real threat to his mar- 
riage to Fay? M-F, 1:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



DIARY 



OI« GAL SV\DAY Adele Wilde be- 
comes an important factor in the Brin- 
thropes"* lives a? her enmity for her for- 
mer husband. George Adams, threatens 
the success of George's projected marriage 
to Marian Price. Sunday, drawn into the 
controversy when George's daughter Betty 
appeals to her for help, cannot foresee the 
strange drama into which this plea will 
project her and Lord Henrv. M-F. 12:45 
P.M. EDT. CBS. 

PEPPER lOI VC'S FAMiLY Pepper 
Young's political career has made him 
fairly familiar with the curious twists and 
turns that the law can sometimes take. But 
he never expected to find his happiness so 
strangely threatened as it is during the 
legal battle over the child he and Linda 
recently adopted. What is the truth behind 
Jim Dennis's grim fight for the baby he 
was once so readv to forget? Can he be 
beaten? M-F. 3:30 P.M. EDT. NBC. 

PERRY MASOy Lawyer Perry Mason 
rarely makes a mistake about human na- 
ture. The recent curious behavior of re- 
porter Jake Jacobsen was a serious blow 
to his faith in his own powers until the 
truth finally emerged. Now. with Jake firm- 
ly on his side. Perry looks ahead to the 
complete ruin of the empire built up by 
arch-criminal Mark Cisar. and the final 
seal of the happiness of Perr\'s client. 
Ruth Davis. M-F. 2:15 P.^L EDT. CBS. 

RIGHT TO UAPPl\ESS Carolyn Kra 
mer Nelson has always believed that, 
fundamentally, a marriage was made by 
the understanding between two people. 
But she is now forced to the bitter realiza- 
tion that sometimes the rest of the world 
can assume a controlling part in the des- 
tiny of a marriage, as determined in- 
triguers make almost unbridgeable the 
gap between her and Miles. Was Miles 
perhaps too willing to turn from her? M-F. 
3:45 P.M. EDT. NBC. 

ROAD OF LIFE It seems like the end of 
a long, anxious road when Dr. Jim Brent 
and Jocelyn are finally married. But both 
of them are too mature and realistic not to 
realize that actually they are at the be- 
ginning of a longer, perhaps more anxious 
road — particularly as Jim's Aunt Regina 
seems determined to make an influential 
place for herself in the newlyweds' lives. 
Can she do it through Jim's daughter 
Janev? M-F. 3:L5 P.M. EDT. NBC. M-F. 
] P.M. EDT. CBS. 

ROMANCE OF HELEy TREXT 

Kelsey Spenser's mysterious death has put 
an end to the tremendous opportunity his 
new motion picture offered designer Helen 
Trent. As Helen faces an uncertain, even 
(Continued on page 18) 



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Ih 



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(Continued from page 17) 



threatening future, lawyer Gil Whitney 
finds it increasingly difficult not to admit 
his love for her and his desire to champion 
her against all the world, if necessary. Can 
Gil find a way to free himself from his 
wife Cynthia? M-F, 12:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

ROSEMAnr At last. Bill and Rosemary 
Roberts await the birth of the baby they 
have longed for, and with Bill's paper, the 
Banner, off to such a promising start, the 
future could look very bright. But the Ban- 
ner's crusade to expose crime in Spring- 
dale has provoked rival editor Edgar Duffy 
into desperate measures to keep Bill from 
getting to the facts. Will his shocking 
frame-up ruin Bill's crusade and his fam- 
ily's future? M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 

THIS IS XOitA DRAKE It seems in- 
creasingly impossible that nurse Nora 
Drake and Dr. Robert Sergeant can look 
forward to any future together, as Dr. 
Sergeant's daughter Grace involves Nora 
in a desperate and dangerous struggle. 
Even if Grace at last faces the full, bitter 
results of her recklessness, the effects of 
her foolishness on Nora's life may be more 
far-reaching than anyone dreamed. M-F. 
2:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

SECOND MRS. BVRTON The Dicks- 
ton music festival meant nothing in Terry 
Burton's life until her mother-in-law's ac- 
tivities made her a reluctant but important 
factor in a situation that threatens to split 
the town right down the middle. Terry 
finds the artistic, temperamental musicians 
an exciting change from humdrum house- 
wifery, but a new problem arises when 
conductor Darryl Masterson wrongly de- 
cides Terry wants to make the change per- 
manent. M-F, 2 P.M. EDT. CBS. 

STEI.EA D AULAS Stella's steadfast re- 
fusal to interfere in her daughter Laurel's 
life is suspended when the marriage of 
Angus Eraser and Maxine Cullen threat- 
ens Laurel's happiness. Because Angus's 
father and Beth's mother are set against 
the marriage of their children. Stella is 
trapped into secrecy, of which she does not 
approve, and into a grim fight for Laurel's 
future. M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

WENDY W ARRETS Wendy, realizing 
that all her hopes for the future hang from 
the slim thread of Mark's emotional sta- 



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bility, cannot help hoping that his stay at 
the sanitarium has finally helped him to 
solve the mental problems that have almost 
torn him apart, even though Mark himself 
is less hopeful and secure than she could 
wish. What will be her place in the future 
of her brilliant, unpredictable husband? 
M-F, 12 noon EDT, CBS. 

WUEN A GiRL MARRIES During the 
long, happy years of the Davis marriage, 
Joan's faith in Harry has never wavered. 
Even now, as Clare O'Brien prepares the 
climax of her desperate struggle to part 
Joan and Harry, Joan feels certain Clare 
can do nothing that will shake her trust. 
But Harry fears that Clare may find a way 
to blight the future with a threat against 
which all his love for Joan will be power- 
less. M-F, 10:45 A.M. EDT, ABC. 

WOMAN MN M y HOUSE Is it a mis- 
take for parents to stay close to their chil- 
dren's problems, even after the children 
are grown-up? James and Jessie Carter 
have never stopped trying to understand 
and help their sons and daughters. But 
their eldest son Jeff sometimes wonders if 
things might be better with a little less 
help. Or — on the other hand — might they 
be very much worse? M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, 
NBC. 

YOLNG DR. MALONE Dr. Jerry Ma- 
lone, his elderly mother, and their friend 
Dr. Browne, are ready to concede defeat 
in their efforts to help readjust young 
Pete when Jerry's young daughter Jill 
takes over. All alone, she seems well on 
the way to making a well-adjusted, co- 
operative boy out of the erstwhile tough 
guy. Meanwhile, Jerry wonders how his 
life will he affected if the marriage of Dr. 
Browne's daughter Mary breaks up. M-F, 
1:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

YOVNG WiDDER UROWN On the 

eve of his wedding to Cathy Wallace, 
Linott Brighton is so severely attacked by 
Jack Gordon that he may be crippled for 
life. Trying to help in the tragedy, Ellen 
Brown and Dr. Anthony Loring realize 
that the true cause of the trouble is Jack's 
wife Sheila, stepdaughter of Ellen's dear- 
est friend, Norine Temple, for it was 
Sheila who incited Jack to the action 
which may ruin four lives. How can Ellen 
help? M-F. 4:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



IN THE OCTOBER ISSUE: 

* GUIDING LIGHT-^an exciting picture story. 

• BANISH FEAR FROM LIFE! 

Anne Seymour's fascinating experience. 

• HELEN TRENT'S DREAM HOUSE 

Julie Stevens owes Helen Trent 

a debt of gratitude for a large hunk of happiness. 

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SMILING at you from above is 260 
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tickled the keys of a battered up- 
right piano in a small town's dime 
store, trying to get prospective cus- 
tomers to buy sheet music. He was 
only in his teens then, and he had 
more hard knocks coming his way. 

During the depression, he man- 
aged to land a job as staff artist at 
Station KWTO in Springfield, 
Missouri. Then he turned to troup- 
ing in vaudeville. But radio soon 
wooed him back with a daily singing 
show. After some of this, plus doing 
commercials. Bill headed for Chi- 
cago and a competitive audition at 
NBC, from which he came out the 
winner. An hour after his victory, 
he shakily faced a microphone and 
his first coast-to-coast audience. 

Everybody seemed to like Bill, 
even Uncle Sam, so for four years 
he served as a supervisor of recre- 
ation in the Navy. After that, back 
to KWTO as program director. 

In 1949, Texas and television 
beckoned, so Bill packed his family 
off to Houston, where he took on a 
heavy schedule of TV programs. 

Nearing the end of his travels. 
Bill went back to the Ozarks and 
became a producer-director on 
assignment from Radiozark Enter- 
prises of Springfield. Then came the 
biggest entertainment opportunity 
of his career: His own week-day 
show over ABC, The Bill Ring Show. 

With his great flair for showman- 
ship, Bill keeps his large and loyal 
audience very happy with his rendi- 
tions of Western and country-style 
music. Probably an even better rea- 
son why Bill's such a master at this 
kind of music is because he is so 
much a part of the land he sings 
about. Folks keep asking Bill why 
he continues to live in the Ozarks, 
when he could originate his show 
from New York, or Hollywood, if he 
liked. "Well," Bill explains, "this 
Ozarks country is the place where 
I've fovmd life the most to my liking. 
You fish a lot, you visit your neigh- 
bors a lot, and you stay happy 
enough that you want to sing a lot!" 

And that's just what this grand 
guy does, much to everyone's joy. 

The Bill Ring Show is heard on most 
ABC Radio stations, Mon., Wed., Fri.. 
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19 



Dotty Mack- 



WAITING FOR LOVE 





Dotty has everything — 
except an adoring husband 
to share it with her 




Former fashion model, oil dressed up, 

going places in her TV career — but there's 

still one goal Dotty hasn't reached. 



FOUR years ago. Dotty Mack was working her way past 
the tables of the guests at a fashion show in one of the 
department stores in Cincinnati. Evei-yone's eyes were 
watching her but Dotty was used to it by now. She moved 
slowly and with grace to show off the long sweep of the 
evening dress which she was modeling. 

At one of the tables was Mort Watters, general manager 
of WCPO ladio and television stations. He was watching 
the show, to see if there were any talented youngsters who 
might make material for TV appearances, when Dotty 
swept by. As she modeled evening gowns, sport clothes, 
little afternoon dresses, he became more and more im- 
pressed with her appearance. After the show was over, he 
approached her backstage and asked her if she would like 
to get a start in show business. 

"It won't be much of a start," Mort laughed. "You'll be 
general handy-woman around WCPO, switchboard oper- 
ator, substitute wherever and whenever we need you." 

Dotty smiled back at Mort. "Mr. Watters, I'll be the best 
switchboard girl you've ever known, and if I do get a 
break on a show — I'll do my best there, too." 

Dotty's first assignment on TV was with the Paul Dixon 
disc jockey show where she learned to pantomime records. 
Then she graduated to Girl Alone in which she pantomimed 
haunting love songs, and now she has a full-fledged pro- 
duction of her own. In a little over four years, Dotty has 
been able to afford one of the most extensive wardrobes in 
the business, including a mink stole ("I couldn't even buy 
a good cloth coat a few years back," she says gratefully). 
She lives with her mother Matilda, two sisters, and her 
stepfather. She has everything a girl could want, except 
her heart's desire — a husband and children. 

The Dotty Mack Show is seen on Du Mont TV, Sun., 10:30 P.M. EDT. 



21 



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How to be a 



WHEN you feel the urge to give 
a party, don't stifle it — either 
the urge or the party. From 
a purely selfish standpoint, giving a 
successful party is an unusually 
satisfying experience. It's person- 
ally rewarding to see people having 
fun — particularly when you can feel 
that they are enjoying themselves 
because of you. Because you got 
them together. Because you ar- 
ranged for an entertaining evening. 
Because you prepared an attractive 
setting for those hours of pure en- 
joyment and relaxation. 

But please don't misunderstand 
my use of the word "relaxation." I 
am not recommending that you in- 
vite friends over just to unwind on 
your wife's newly upholstered chair 
or freshly slip-covered couch, drip- 
ping ashes hit-or-miss all over the 
living-room rug. Despite the old 
saying about ashes keeping moths 
away, I don't believe there's a house- 



wife in America who really believes 
it and wouldn't gladly relieve the 
culprit of what she considers a use- 
less bit of excess baggage — his head. 

No, that's not what I call hosting. 
But let's start at the beginning. If 
you don't just naturally like people, 
forget the whole thing — you'll never 
make a good host. Friendliness is 
something you can't force, turn on 
and off like an electric light. You 
may think you're getting away with 
it, but, believe me, you're the only 
one who thinks so. The average per- 
son can spot a phony from his first 
words of greeting. I, personally, be- 
lieve that good hosts are boi-n — born 
friendly, with what psychologists 
call outgoing personalities. 

Having established the fact that 
from a personality standpoint you 
should make a good host, let's get 
on to my Rule Number One. Put 
yourself in your guests' place, and 
arrange j^our party to suit your 




It's no problem to keep guests like Godfrey relaxed! But Billingsley 
points out that most people need guidance — such as he describes here. 



good host 



By 
SHERMAN BILLINGSLEY 




guests, not yourself. Okay, so Can- 
asta may not be what you consider 
the end-all in the line of fun, but if 
you know your eight guests are 
"mad for it!" — for Pete's sake, make 
it a Canasta party. Don't force them 
into the game room for a fast round 
of table tennis just because you hap- 
pen to play table tennis better than 
Canasta. Always remember you're 
giving a party for your guests, not 
yourself! My philosophy about host- 
ing at the Stork Club is: "Please the 
customer, and he'll come back." The 
same applies to private hosting. 

Point Number Two almost goes 
without saying — but is too often 
ignored. When you make up your 
guest list, make sure the guests will 
get along with each other. It doesn't 
take many misfits to spoQ a party. 
And remember — the misfits in one 
group won't necessarily be misfits 
in another. Its much better to give 
two small but successful parties dur- 
ing a season, than one big but catas- 
trophic aflfair. And both types will 
be the talk of the town. 

There is one little party-giving 
peculiarity I have that people seem 
to like. I never give a party in my 
own name. I give it in the name of 
the guest of honor. And I find out 
from the guest of honor if there are 
certain people he or she would like 




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How to be a good host 




Billingsley and Stork Club guests Stu and June Erwin, Gisele MacKenzie. 



to have included on the guest Hst. 
I have a number of friends who have 
taken up this approach with great 
success. One friend even gave a 
birthday party in honor of Big Mike, 
his three-year-old St. Bernard. Big 
Mike, who is extremely friendly and 
forgetful of his size, was on hand 
to welcome the guests and receive 
his just desserts . . . made a per- 
fect host. 

All right, by now you've selected 
your guests and formulated a party 
idea that will, to the best of your 
knowledge, meet with the approval 
of those guests. Point Number Three 
I can't emphasize enough — be sure 
you take care of your guests as soon 
as they arrive. Be on hand to greet 
them. If one guest is not familiar 
with most of the others, introduce 
him to a congenial group immedi- 
ately . . . and make certain there is 
a comfortable conversation going 
before you leave to tend to your 
other guests. Never make guests 
stand around for even one awkward 
moment. Try to anticipate their 
needs — introductions, a cigarette, re- 
freshments, or whatever the case 
may be. Remember, first impres- 
sions are the most important and 
lasting. 

And, speaking of good impressions, 
brings me to the question of menus 
for dinner parties. So many people 
ask me why I usually serve steak 



for a dinner party — rather than 
something exotic like pheasant un- 
der glass, or venison, or a multitude 
of other things. Why steak? Simply 
because I know you can't go wrong 
with steak. The people who really 
like exotic main courses are rela- 
tively few and far between. And 
I've yet to meet the man who doesn't 
like steak. But an out-of-the-ordi- 
nary appetizer and a fancy dessert 
will give the dinner a sufficiently 
festive atmosphere to make a con- 
versation piece, without making it 
necessary to stop off at the drug- 
store on the way home. 

One last caution. Never forget the 
personal touch. A few minutes out 
to ask about the new baby, comment 
on some good fortune of a guest, or 
ask how the latest business venture 
is going, is an excellent way to put 
friends and acquaintances at their 
ease. At the Stork Club, I like to 
table-hop and chat with my guests 
(I prefer to call my customers 
my guests), just the way I do on 
my TV Stork Club show. After all, 
the main difference between my 
hosting and yours is the size of the 
party. Fundamentally, all hosts are 
in the same business — that, of help- 
ing people enjoy themselves. 

The Stork Club, with Sherman Billingsley as 
host, is seen on CBS-TV, Saturday, 7 P.M. 
EDT, sponsored by Chesterfield Cigarettes. 



Information 
Booth 

Ask your questions — 

ive^ll try to 

find the answers 

Red-face Department 

Dear Reader: 

We're starting off with bowed heads this 
month and hopes that it won't happen again. 

The Editors 



In our July issue, we included an item 
in Information Booth about the Jan Miner 
Fan Club. We'd like to make it clear that, 
for information about the Jan Miner Fan 
Club only, write to: Personal Service, 417 
\^ est 50th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Phil Sterling 

Dear Editor: 

Will you please print a picture of the 
actor who portrays Reed Nixon on the day- 
time radio program Hilltop House and tell 
me a little something about him? 

M. H., Antioch, W. Va. 

Phil Sterling plays Reed Nixon on Hill- 
top House, but that's not his only claim to 
fame. This very busy fellow is also seen 
on CBS-T\ 's Search For Tomorrow and is 
heard on The Guiding Light. You also may 
have heard him at various times on Counter- 
Spy and Mr. Keen — or seen him occasion- 
ally on TV in Suspense and The Kraft TV 
Theatre. Phil lives in New York City and 
is a happy groom of one year. 

(Continued on page 27 j 





Phil Sterling 



For advertising rales, write to Publisher's Classified Departmenl, 9 South Clinton Sfreet, Chicago 6 (Sepl.-Wo.) 



MONEY MAKING OPPORTUNITIES 

MAKE MONEY ADDRESSING! Typists or long 
hand! National mail order concern wants you! Work 
evenings at home. Oriental Miniatures, FuUerton 19. 

Calif. 

PART-TIME— WOMEN to work in their homes 3-5 
hrs. Per day. Mailers. 4043 St. Clair Ave.. Dept. G9. 

Cleveland 3. Ohio. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY Weekly mailing circulars lor 
advertisers. Complete instructions — 25c. Siwaslian. 

4317-F Gleane Street. Elmhurst 73. N. Y. 

FREE BOOK "505 Odd. Successlul Businesses." Work 
home! Expect something Odd! Pacific TW. Oceanside 

Calif. 

MAKE MONEY ADDRESSING Envelopes! Our infor- 
mation reveals how. Only 30c. Business. P.O. Box 2224. 

St. Louis. Mo. 

EARN BIG MONEY' — Invisibly Reweave damaged gar- 
ments at home! Details Free. Fabricon. S348A Prairie 

Chicago 19. 

AGENTS WANTED 

NEW PROFIT BUILDER for Xmas card and other 
direct agents. Amazing Glitter Pen Kit decorates any 
surface in 6 dazzling colors. Easily sold for personalizing 
and decorating Xmas cards. Xmas stockings, gift pack- 
ages, ribbons, scarfs, candles and 100 other items. Special 
Otter-send Sl.OO for 2 Kits, retail Sl.OO each. Money 
back guarantee if not delighted. Glitter Sales. Dept. 40. 

Montclalr. N. J. 

WOMEN! MEN! MAKE e.xtra money in your spare 
time. No house-to-house canvassing required. New Car 
given as bonus. Amazing nylons guaranteed as long as 
9 months depending on quantity, against runs, snags, 
holes, or replaced free. Rush name and hose size for 
simple money making plan. Lowell Wilkin. A-4439 

Wash., Greenfield. Ohio. 

TRIM HAIK WITHOUT "Barber". Miracle clipper sells 
on sight. Keeps hair neat. Samples sent on trial. Kristee 

318. ■A.kron. Ohio. 

HUGE PROFITS. ASSEMBLE Rhinestone Jewelry 
Sample kit $1.79. You sell for S6.50. Wholesale Catalog 

25c. House of Hobbies. Box 790H. Evanston. 111. 

SALESWOMEN WANTED 

ANYONE CAN SELL tamous Hoover Uniforms for 
beauty shops, waitresses, nurses, doctors, others. All 
popular miracle fabrics — nylon, dacron, orlon. Exclusive 
styles, top quality. Big cash income now. real future. 
Equipment tree. Hoover. Dept. R-119. New York 11, 

N.Y. 

GET OWN DRESSES As Bonus and make extra money 
weekly part time showing friends nationally known 
Maisonette dresses, lingerie, children's wear, etc., and 
taking fast orders. Write Maisonette. 4439 Sycamore 

Street. Anderson. Indiana. 

FEMALE HELP WANTED 
DEMONSTRATORS — S25-S40 daily. Our Lingerie 
Apparel Style Showings are sensation of party plan sell- 
ing. Isabel Sharrow made ,S258 — 11 days sparetime! Free 
outfit. Beeline Fashions. 4145-MF Lawrence. Chicago 30 . 
YOUR PERSONAL LINGERIE free as bonus — extra 
cash besides — introducing sensational Curve-Tailored 
Idea to friends. Outfit Free. World's-Star. Dept. K-87. 
Grand Rapids. Michigan. 

MAKE MONEY INTRODUCING World's cutest 
children's dresses. Big selection adorable styles. Low 
prices Complete display free. Rush name. Harford, Dept. 

K-23.59, Cincinnati 25, Ohio. 

REWARD! EXTRA MONEY For You. Take care 
huge demand Melville dresses, women, children's. Get 
own dresses Free. Just send name, address, age. dress 

size. Melville Co., Dept. 8135, Cincinnati 25. O. 

EASY MONEY! SELL new kind nylons. Guaranteed 3 
months. Perfect fit, like made-to-order, for every leg- 
shape. .Sample kit with actual stocking Free. American 

Mills. Dept. B-35, Indianapolis. 

C-\N YOU MAKE $40 A Week, Addressing postcards at 
home, in your spaietime"? Write Hood's, Kannapolis 4, 

N.C. (Inclose stamped, addressed envelope). 

AMAZING EXTRA-MONEY PLAN gives you gorgeous 
dress without penny cost. Rush name today, with dress 

s ize. Harford. Dept. K-263. Cincinnati 25. Ohio. 

LADIES; ADDRESS FOLDER Cards Spare Time! $40 
Weekly possible! Enclose stamped addressed envelope; 

write Folders. Tillar. Ark. 

S30 00 WEEKLY, SPARE time, making Studio Roses 
at home. Easy. Write. Studio Co., Greenville 5, Penna . 
ADDRESSERS-LONGHAND OR typewriter. Work 
home tew hours dally. World Trade. 9111 So. Magnolia 

Anaheim 17. Calif. 

' PERSONAL 
BORROW BY MAIL. Loans S50 to $600 to employed 
men and women. Easy. Quick. Completely confidential. 
No endorsers. Repay in convenient monthly payments' 
Details free in plain envelope. Give occupation. State 
Finance Co.. 323 Securities Bldg.. Dept. E 69. Omaha 2, 

Nebr. 

OLD COINS WANTED 
WE PURCHASE INDIANHEAD pennies. Complete 
allcoin catalogue 20c. Magnacolns. Box 61-RC. White- 

stone 57. New York. 

HOME SEWERS WANTED 

SEW FAMOUS BABYWEAR. Fast. Easy. Profitable. 
Big holiday business. Write Liebig Industries. Beaver 

Dam 8. Wisconsin. 

WOMEN SEW RAP-A-ROUND. spare time — profitable, 
Hollvwood Manufacturing Co.. Dept. D, Hollywood 46. 

Calif. ^ 

CARTOONING & COMMERCIAL ART 

"HOW TO MAKE Money With Simple Cartoons" — A 
book everyone who likes to draw should have. It is free; 
no obligation. Simply address Cartoonists' Exchange, 

Dept. 689, Pleasant Hill. Ohio. 

EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
OVERSEAS JOBS. WOMEN! Men! Big pay, transpor- 
tation, expenses. Clerical, professional, mechanical work- 
ers. Most all trades. Latest listings airline, construction 
manufacturing, oil. steamship companies, governmen 
agencies, many other opportunities. IJp to date informa- 
tion on securing employment, contracts, income tax 
application forms. $1.00. Overseas Jobs, Box 335-H8A 
Baton Rouge, La. 



EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES 



EASILY MAKE $65 Week as Practical Nurse. Learn 
quickly at home. No high school necessary, no age limit. 
Write today for free booklet, lessons. Post Graduate 
Hospital School of Nursing, 21E9 Auditorium Bldg., 

Chicago. 

COMPLETE YOUR HIGH School at home in spare 
time with 55-year-old school. Texts furnished. No classes. 
Diploma. Information booklet free. American School, 

Dept. X674, Drexel at 58th, Chicago 37, III. 

PRACTICAL NURSING— LEARN Easily at Home, 
Spare Time. Big demand, good earnings. High school not 
necessary. Write for free facts. Wayne School, Dept. 

AW-7, 2525 Sheffleld. Chicago 14. III. 

DENTAL NURSING. PREPARE at home tor big pay 
career. Chairside duties, reception, laboratory. Person- 
ality Development. Free Book. Wayne School. Lab 

BA-5. 2521 Sheffield. Chicago 14. 

HIGH SCHOOL — NO classes, study at home. Spare 
Time. Diploma awarded. Write for Free Catalog HCH 9, 
Wayne School, 2527 N. Sheffleld. Chicago 14, 111. 

FOR THIN PEOPLE 

DON'T BE SKINNY. New kind of pleasant homogenized 
liquid super rich in calories. Puts firm flesh on cheeks, 
bustline, chest, arms, all over body. Gains ol 20 lbs. in 6 
weeks reported. Full pint $3.00. If COD., postage extra. 
Money back guarantee. Wate On Co., Dept. 182, 230 N. 
Michigan, Chicago 1. 

OF INTEREST TO WOMEN 

FREE BIG NEW Wholesale Catalog! Up to 50% saving 
for you, family, friends on nationally-known gilts, mer - 
chandise, hosiery, appliances, cards, etc. Also make money 
selling part time! Write Today. Evergreen Studios. Box 

846-BS. Evergreen Park 42. III. 

MAKE MONEY ADDRESSING Envelopes. Guar- 
anteed list for advertising agencies and direct mail 
houses. Send Sl.OO for information and list in your locale 
to; Addresso Information. Room 421. 80 Boylston St.. 

Boston, Massachusetts. 

12 NEW TOWELS, Large size Sl.OO! Assorted colors. 
New, not seconds. Money back guarantee. Order now. 
Supply limited. Towel Shop Dept. 965. Box 881, St. 

Louis, Mo. 

WE PAY CASH For Boxtops, Labels, Wrappers. Cou- 
pons. Etc!! Particulars free. Boxtops. PW 983-E, Main. 

Columbus 5, Ohio. 

SPARE TIME MONEY! Sew neckties from special pat- 
terns. You make them-we sell them! Toni Ties, Fullerton 

21, California. 

MATERNITY STYLES. WRITE tor tree catalog show- 
ing entire maternity wardrobe. S2.95 to $22.50. Craw- 
ford's, Dept. 28, 8015 Wornall, Kansas City, Missouri . 
MAKE MONEY ADDRESSING envelopes. Our in- 
structions reveal How. Paul Glenway, 5713 Euclid, 

Cleveland 3, Ohio. 

PROFITABLE HOME BUSINESS. Make Fast-Seller 
chenille monkev trees. Literature Free. Velva, Bohemia 

32. N. Y. 

HOME SEWERS NEEDED. Everything furnished. 75c 
per hour. Tie of Month. Dept. 1, 216 W. Jackson Blvd., 

Chicago 6, 111. 

NEED CASH'? ASSEMBLE ties at home for our mar- 
kets. All materials furnished. Wilson Ties, Stillwater ID, 

Minn. 

CHRISTMAS GREETING CARDS 

MONEY FOR XMAS. Make at least $50 showing beauti- 
ful Elmira Christmas and All-Occasion Greeting Card 
Assortments-Name Imprinted Christmas Cards, Station- 
ery. Napkins. Book Matches. Playing Cards — Gift 
Wraps. Books. Games. Household. Hostess Items. All 
unbeatable values. Make money while you make friends. 
No Experience Necessary — No Risk — Send No Money. 
Free Samples. Catalog. Bonus Plan. Display Assortments 
on approval. Write Today! Elmira Greeting Card Co.. 

Dept. C-205. Elmira, N.Y. 

PERSONALIZED CHRISTMAS CARDS. Cost less 
than 3c each with sender's name imprinted. Orders come 
fast and easy. Make big money with America's finest line. 
Also Box Assortments. Gift Wraps, Gifts, etc. 30 actual 
cards with name imprinted sent free as samples, plus 5 
boxes you can sell at $5.50 sent on approval. Send name, 
address today. General Card Co., Dept. 1299, 1300 W. 

Jackson Blvd., Chicago 7. 111. 

GIRLS. WOMEN! MAKE easy extra Money, full or 
sparetime. Sell 50 for Sl.OO Christmas Cards, other gifts 
and hosiery to friends, neighbors. No experience needed — 
we show you how! Write for Free Kit, 5 Big Sample Port 
folios. Special Party Plan! Elmcraft, 5930 So. Western 

Dept. 507S. Chicago 36, III. 

SENSATIONAL EARNINGS WITH fastest-selling 
name-imprinted Christmas Cards — both popular-priced 
and DeLuxe. Box assortments too. Write for .samples. 
Wallace Brown, 225 Fifth Ave., Dept. E-42, New York 

10, N.Y. 

EA.SY CASH QUICK! Show friends, neighbors complete 
line Christmas Cards and Gifts. Samples on approval. 
Peerless Gree tings, 316 North Michigan, Chicago. 

PROFITABLE OCCUPATIONS 

GROW MUSHROOMS. CELLAR. Shed. Spare, full 
time, year round. We pay $3. ,50 lb. We Paid Babbitt 
$4,165.00 in few weeks. Free Book. Washington Mush- 
room Industries, Dept. 163, 2954 Admiral Way. Seattle 

Wash. 

WANTED CHILDREN'S PHOTOS 

W.A.NTED CHILDREN'S PHOTOS (All Ages-Types) 
tor billboards, calendars, magazine covers. Up to S200 
paid lor pictures by advertisers. Send small black and 
white photo (One Only). Print child's full name and 
parents' name and address on back. Picture returned 30 
days. Spotlite Childs' Directory. Dept. 1, 5864 Holly- 

wood Blvd.. Hollywood 28. California. 

LEATHERCRAFT 

MAKE LEATHER ITEMS as Gifts or to Sell. Easy-to- 
assemble belts, purses, gloves, woolskin toys. etc. need 
no tools or experience. Send 10c today for big catalog 
of over 100 ideas, largest stock in U.S. J. C. Larson Co., 

820 S. Tri pp. Dept. 3091A. Chicago 24. 

STAMPS 

FREE! SCOTT'S INTERNATIONAL Album. Other big 
premiums. Full particulars with approvals. Raymax, 
68BXA, Nassau Street, New York 38. 



:j5 



'The Long and Short of it" 




Broadcasting from his own music room, Meredith is very relaxed. 




26 



Last-minute script study os wife Rini pours coffee. 



IF YOU were to try to list all of Meredith 
Willson's attributes and accomplish- 
ments, they would probably stretch 
from here to the moon. For his road of 
life is as well traveled as a New York 
City street. Best known as a composer 
("You and I", "May The Good Lord 
Bless and Keep You") and conductor 
(Tallulah Bankhead's favorite bandsman 
on the All Star Revue), Meredith has 
also taken his place high among the 
ranks as an author (And There I Stood 
with My Piccolo), TV panelist (The 
Name's The Same) and disc jockey 
(Ev'ry Day, currently heard from 9:45 
to 10 A.M. EDT weekdays on NBC). 
Not to be forgotten are the "Talking 
People," Meredith's unique five-man 
conception of how to make commercials 
and straight choral presentations 
interesting and lively. 

At heart, this strapping six-foot, 
professorial-looking young man is a 
humorist-philosopher. One of the best- 
liked men in the business, Meredith 
goes about a frantic, scurrying studio with 
a calm, at-ease air that soothes even 
the most temperamental tantnim- 
thrower. He likes his work and the 
people he works with, and two of his 
favorite habits are promoting kindness 
and developing friendships. 

Meredith's many-sided career burst 
into bloom when, at fourteen — and as 
Mason City, Iowa's sole owner of a 
flute (mail-order, at that) — he set out for 
New York and The Damrosch Institute 
of Musical Arts. Within a few years, 
he was playing in John Philip Sousa's 
band, then with the N. Y. Philharmonic- 
Symphony Orchestra under Toscanini. 
From then on, except for the Army 
calling him Major for a while, there was 
no stopping him and his many talents. 

This summer, the spotlight is on 
Meredith's weekday show, Ev'ry Day, 
which is usually broadcast from the 
music room of his Mandeville Canyon 
home in California. Here he plays 
everything from classics to boogie, which 
is why he describes his show as "the 
long and short of it." The fact that 
Meredith knows what he's talking about 
and people like it is evidenced by his 
mail intake, which ranges from 1500 to 
2000 letters a week. 

Always on hand, whether they're in 
California or New York, are Meredith's 
pretty wife, Rini Zarova, and his lovable 
dachshund. Piccolo. Another of his 
proudest possessions is his fabulous 
record collection, for which his audiences 
are eternally grateful, for they are the 
spark that brings this genial, garrulous 
genius into their homes and hearts. 



41 



i 



Information 
Booth 



I C.ontintted ) 



Dotty's Blouse 

Dear Editor: 

I've heard thai the blouse Dorothy Col- 
lins always wears is her own creation. Is it 
really? If so. how did she happen to think 
it up? G. S.. W'estport. N. Y . 

Dorothy did design the blouse herself, 
about five year? ago. .\t that time she was 
singing with tiie Raymond Scott Quintet, 
and. as she tells it. "I couldn't afford orig- 
inal gowns, and every so often we'd be 
playing a dance and Yd see two or three 
girls in the crowd wearing the same dress 
I had on. So one day I decided to wear 
my own creation." Dotty bought a pink 
blouse for $12.9.5. changed the collar and 
the sleeves a little, but. more important, 
added a black \elvet bow tie. Now Mrs. 
Raymond Scott. Dotty considers the blouse 
her trademark, and always wears it. or a 
variation, for her television appearances. 

Seeing Triple? 

Dear Editor: 

Could you please tell me whether the 
MrGuire Sisters are triplets? 

M.C.. Coatesville. I nil. 

No. Arthur Godfrey's cute McCuire 
Sisters. Christine. Phyllis and Dorothy, are 
really sisters, thougli. They hail from 
Miamisbiirg. Ohio, and have been singing 
together since they were very small. 
Phyllis, the youngest, sings the lead voice. 




^ - 




.%^ 



The McGuire Sisters 

CHRISTINE. PHYLLIS and DOROTHY 



Mr Skin Thrives On 
Cashmere Bouquet Soap 

. . because its sueh wholesome skin-carer 





^. «^ 



\ove\Y 



^^ Complexion; 



Read how this glamorous opera singer was 
helped by Candy Jones, Famous Beauty Director 

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Miss Harmon, "but in New York I learned mere talent isn't 
enough! So I went to the Conover School, and my very first 
lesson was basic complexion care with Cashmere Bouquet 
Soap. Candy Jones told me it was gentle, wholesome skin care, 
and she was right. Now I beauty-cleanse with that fluffy, 
fragrant lather twice a day. My skin thrives on it!" 

Regular care with mild Cashmere Bouquet Soap will give 
your complexion a softer, naturally lovely look that make-up 
can never achieve. You'll love it! 








Here Are Candy Jones' Personal 
Beauty Tips for You! 



Protruding ears limit your hair-styles? Put a few 
drops of collodion behind each ear, press firmly to 
head for three minutes. They should stay put for hours! 
P When your face "feels tired," a quick washing 
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More later, ClUi^^f^ 



& 



«ryon6 is 
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THE SHAMPOO 

WITH TWICE 

AS MUCH 

.ANOLIN 



^ SHANAPOO 
THAT WON'T LEAVE 

HAIR WILD— 7^ 
THAT'S FOR ^Ae/^^O^P^^, 

. . . WITH 
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LANOLIN AS ANV 
OTHER SHA^APOO. 




K 




—WISH IT 
WOULD TA^AE 
KIDS LIKE IT 
DOES HAIR/ 



1-^^^ 



.^ 



GEE, yoUR HAIR 
ISSOFTANDSHINV 
SINCE you'vE 

USED THAT 
NEW SHATAPOoi^ 





DOESNT HELENE 
CURTIS CREfAE 

SHA^APOO HAVE /^WEP/ MOIA 
SCRUhAPTIOUS / SAVS IT LATHERS 
LATHER? J BETTER THAN ANV j^ 
OTHER IN OUR 
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THE TWINKLE 
WITH TWICE 

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vluR WONDERS 

HAI R ' / ^^^ ^^ 
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28 



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Information 



TVs Cutest? 

Dear Editor: 

Our family is sure that the cutest girl 
on television is the girl who plays William 
Bendix's daughter on The Life Of Riley. 
Who is she and what is she like? 

R. P., San Francisco, Cal. 

Pert Lugene Sanders, the 18-year-old 
"Babs" of Life Of Riley, is a college stu- 
dent by night and a TV actress by day. 
She lives in California's San Fernando 
Valley with her parents and, what with 
studying dramatic arts at U.S.C. night 
school and studying scripts for daytime 
rehearsals, she hardly has time for much 
recreation. She doesn't even act in school 
plays. "If I had one more script to mem- 
orize," she moans, in typical teenager 
fashion, "I'd go off the beam." 

Only One Mike 

Dear Editor: 

We've seen Mike Wallace on television 
hundreds of times and think he and his 
wife Buff Cobb are "Mr. and Mrs. Tele- 
vision" themselves. When I said this to one 
of our neighbors, she said he is the same 
Mike Wallace that we used to call "Mr. 
Radio" out here in Chicago in the '40s. 
Is he? P. D., Chicago, III. 

The very same. Mike made a radio 
reputation in Chicago as host of interview 
sessions from hotels and top restaurants 
long before he discovered TV. Before that, 
he had announced and acted in famous 




Buff Cobb Wallace 



Booth 



radio serials like Tlie Green Hornet. Tlie 
Lone Ranger. Ma Perkins, and Colliding 
Light. Mike met Buffie. the gianddaugliter 
of the late humorist Irvin S. Cobb, when 
she visited Chicago as part of the stage 
company of "Private Lives." He invited 
Buffie to be a guest on his radio show. 
Melody Lane. They were married in 
March. 1949. 

Walter the Wizard 

Dear Editor: 

Would you please let me know where 
Walter O'Keeje is? Is he on any new pro- 
gram? He said he would be. ff e certainly 
miss him. M. T., Oakland. Cal. 

We hope you're still not missing Walter, 
who's the star of that new show, radio's 
Vi izard Of Odds, and has been substituting 
this summer for Herb Shriner on Two For 
The Monev. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— Ij there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth. 
Radio-TV Mirror. 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. We'll answer, if we can, 
provided your question is of general in- 
terest. Answers will appear in this column 
— 6m/ be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 





f^^...now more exciting 
...more mviting ! 






■ jc« 



Walter O'Keefe 



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' 





llfOHW HO^ig 



Accompanied by his wife and mofher, the Strike If Rich hero returns to Gasporf as on honored "native son." 



LOOKING 
HOMEWARD 



By FLORENCE HULL REEF 



I've known Warren Hull from the moment 
he was bom and, during his childhood, knew 
him as intimately as his own parents. As 
his aunt, I have looked at him both affectionately 
and objectively. His success in show business 
and on Strike It Rich seems to me to be quite 
natvural, for even as a boy he was gentle, 
sensitive, and emotional. 

He was bom in a small frame house, and I was 
the first person to hold him. He was just a few 
minutes old and he was squirming, turning this 
way and that. Obviously, Warren was looking 
arotmd to see where he was. 

He was in Gasport, New York, a village some 
twenty-five miles from Buffalo. Gasport was 

See Next Page 




asport — but folks there recall "'more darn wonderful things!" 




Warren Hull from infancy to young manhood: A protective big brother (with baby sister Grace) . . 



LOOKING 
HOMEWARD 




Author — and aunt: Florence Hull Reef knew just what to 
cook for her favorite nephew, when Warren came home.' 



a small town then, and today boasts a popxilation of 
only nine hundred. From the window you could see 
oak and maple and walnut trees, broad expanses of 
green fields and the farmers' apple orchards. The 
home itself was smaU and humble, but Warren's 
heritage was quite rich. 

His parents and all of his relatives were very re- 
ligious, for his Quaker ancestry goes back over three 
hundred years, and many of his forefathers survived 
the religious prejudice of their time through faith and 
courage alone. The Hulls were truly pioneers, for 
they had come to America in 1626. 

Warren has always drawn inspiration from his 
forebears. In his present Westchester home and in 
all other homes he has ever lived in, pictures which 
have always hung in a prominent position are those 
of his great-grandparents, Nehemiah and Hannah. 
His grandmother was called Aunt Hannah by every- 
one in her day and by her descendants, too. 

Aunt Hannah was self-educated and had learned 
to read by the time she was three. At six, she had 
read the Bible fromi beginning to end three times. 
Before she was in her teens, she was an authority on 
the works of the Lord, and adiilts came to her for a 
perfect rendition of a biblical passage they were 
trying to remember. 

As a young woman she began to practice medicine 
and, untU her death, this slight, tireless woman 
braved storms and all-night treks to tend the sick. 
She, of course, had no formal education and, when 
New York State required all practitioners to have a 
license, she had to stop her good work for a time. 
Then licensed doctors who had seen her bring the 
desperately ill back to normal life petitioned the state 
to give Aunt Hannah a license. They were successful 
and she continued to dedicate her life to the public 
welfare. 

This philosophy of doing for others had been a trait 
passed on from one generation to the next. I remem- 
ber my mother (Warren's grandmother) provoked 
us, the way she tired herself helping others in the 
community. Of course, my sister and I laugh at our- 
selves now, for we do the same thing. The passion 



32 





born leader (heading an impromptu parade) . . . devoted member of a loving family (with Grace and "middle" sister Lynn). 

Rose for Mom from a bush Warren planted as o child. 



for helping is part of the Hull personality, and this 
is something everyone sees in Warren in his role as 
emcee on Strike It Rich. Even as a child, he was the 
one to bring home every stray dog for a good meal 
and a blanket by the fire. 

Warren was the first grandchild to be bom and, 
although we were to find that there was enough love 
and admiration for his sisters and cousins who came 
later, nevertheless he was the first and we thought 
the very brightest. 

He was walking and talking at a very early age. 
He was a cheerfxil toddler and a good-natured Uttle 
boy. I can't remember him ever doing the typical, 
cussed little things that children do — ^breaking some- 
one's doll or teasing a dog out of spite. On the other 
hand, Warren was a leader even in his tender years. 
It was Warren who was the director and star of the 
back-yard theatre. It was Warren who led the toy 
band up and down the dirt road. It was Warren who 
got the boys together for a ball game. 

I personally know of only one time Warren was 
spanked. He was about three and I warmed his pants 
but, for the life of me, I can't remember why. (I am 
seventy-two and have a head jammed full of mem- 
ories.) I remember, though, he was always inquisi- 
tive and once didn't mind when I told him to leave 
a mousetrap be. The mousetrap did its own pun- 
ishing. 

Warren learned to do for himself as well as others. 
His father had learned from necessity. You see, 
Warren's grandfather had been a minister and farmer 
but, when his health suffered, he had moved the 
family to Gasport. That was in 1890. With his sons, 
he set up a repair shop for bicycles and such ma- 
chinery as they had in those days. Warren's father, 
John, was an inventive genius and was the leader in 
the shop. Soon they were manufacturing bicycles 
and the first powered orchard-spraying equipment. 
John and his brothers made one of the first automo- 
biles to be seen in this country, in the pre-Ford year 
of 1900. John Hvill frequently bvirned the midnight 
oil at the plant. 

In the early days, the whole family — girls, boys and 



L 




( : 




mssLw^ 

Warren Hull from inforicy to young monhood: A protective big brother (with baby sister Grace) 



LOOKING 
HOMEWARD 







Author — ond aunt; Florence Hull Reef knew just whot to 
cook for her favorite nephew, when Warren came home. 



a small town then, and today boasts a population of 
only nine hundred. From the window you could see 
oak and maple and walnut trees, broad expanses of 
green fields and the farmers' apple orchards. The 
home itself was small and humble, but Warren's 
heritage was quite rich. 

His parents and aU of his relatives were very re- 
ligious, for his Quaker ancestry goes back over three 
hundred years, and many of his forefathers survived 
the religious prejudice of their time through faith and 
courage alone. The HuUs were truly pioneers, for 
they had come to America in 1626. 

Warren has always drawn inspiration from his 
forebears. In his present Westchester home and in 
all other homes he has ever lived in, pictures which 
have always hung in a prominent position are those 
of his great-grandparents, Nehemiah and Hannah. 
His grandmother was called Aunt Hannah by every- 
one in her day and by her descendants, too. 

Aunt Hannah was self-educated and had learned 
to read by the time she was three. At six, she had 
read the Bible from beginning to end three times. 
Before she was in her teens, she was an authority on 
the works of the Lord, and adults came to her for a 
perfect rendition of a biblical passage they wei* 
trying to remember. . . 

As a young woman she began to practice medicine 
and, untU her death, this sUght, tireless woroM> 
braved storms and all-night treks to tend the sicK- 
She, of course, had no formal education and, when 
New York State required all practitioners to have a 
license, she had to stop her good work for a time. 
Then licensed doctors who had seen her bring tne 
desperately ill back to normal life petitioned the sta 
to give Aunt Hannah a license. They were suc<=^^ 
and she continued to dedicate her life to the pu" 
welfare. .. 

This philosophy of doing for others had been a trai^ 
passed on from one generation to the next. I '■^'"l^ 
her my mother (Warren's grandmother) P"'.'^''jj,e 
us, the way she tired herself helping others at 
community. Of course, my sister and I laugh at o ^^ 
selves now, for we do the same thing. The pass 




32 






born leader (heading on impromptu parade) . . . devoted member of a loving family (with Grace and "middle" sister Lynn). 

Rose for Mom from a bush Warren plonted as o child. 



for helping is part of the Hull personality, and this 
is something everyone sees in \Varren in his role as 
emcee on Strike It Rich. Even as a child, he was the 
one to bring home every stray dog for a good meal 
and a blanket by the fire. 

Warren was the first grandchild to be bom and, 
although we were to find that there was enough love 
and admiration for his sisters and cousins who came 
later, nevertheless he was the first and we thought 
the very brightest. 

He was walking and talking at a very early age. 
He was a cheerful toddler and a good-natured little 
boy. I can't remember him ever doing the typical, 
cussed little things that children do — ^breaking some- 
one's doll or teasing a dog out of spite. On the other 
hand, Warren was a leader even in his tender years. 
It was Warren who was the director and star of the 
back-yard theatre. It was Warren who led the toy 
band up and down the dirt road. It was Warren who 
got the boys together for a ball game. 

I personally know of only one time Warren was 
spanked. He was about three and I warmed his pants 
but, for the life of me, I can't remember why. (I am 
seventy-two and have a head jammed full of mem- 
ories.) I remember, though, he was always inquisi- 
tive and once didn't mind when I told him to leave 
a mousetrap be. The mousetrap did its own pun- 
ishing. 

Warren learned to do for himself as well as others. 
His fattier had learned from necessity. You see, 
Warren's grandfather had been a minister and farmer 
but, when his health suffered, he had moved the 
family to Gasport. That was in 1890. With his sons, 
he set up a repair shop for bicycles and such ma- 
chinery as they had in those days. Warren's father, 
John, was an inventive genius and was the leader in 
the shop. Soon they were manufacturing bicycles 
*nd the first powered orchard-spraying equipment 
John end his brothers made one of the first automo- 
biles tc be seen in this country, in the pre-Ford year 
of 1900 John Hull frequently burned the midnight 
oil at the plant. 

In the early days, the whole family— girls, boys and 





r^ 









POR 



^-.ijIdKQF^t^-'^z:^ 




LOOKING 
HOMEWARD 



Warren's biggest moments: With his mother, visiting the house where he was born 



Old swimming hole: Warren shows daughter Sally and the neighbor- 
hood children where he used to splash around when he was a youngster. 





dedicating the new Gasport firehouse (sons Paul and George standing at far right, just behind little Sally). 



End of a wonderful day: A happy homecomer reminisces 
with his wife Sue, mother Laura, and aunt Ruth hlarkness. 



adtilts — ^pitched into the work of putting spokes in 
wheels or working a drill. Warren in his teen years 
was to work for a time at the punch presses and 
lathes, but his handiness came out much earlier. 

The home where Warren spent most of his child- 
hood still boasts the same rose arbors Warren con- 
structed when he was twelve years old. He built 
his own wagons, toboggan, skis, and ambitiously 
finished a boat, the Swan. The Swan, it is sad to 
tell, when hauled to the dammed-up creek, imme- 
diately capsized. But Warren was learning to be 
self-sufficient. He knows what workclothes feel 
like and he knows the feel of honest sweat. I think 
he would have been taught these things even if his 
• father had been wealthy. But, to be realistic, the 
Hull brothers in those early days never drew more 
than five doUars at a time from the business, and 
that was for groceries and essentials. 

Warren was taught by his father that a person 
should always be so upright that he can look any 
man, even a stranger, straight in the eyes. He was 
told about htiman dignity and the dependency of 
one man upon another. I remember a workman 
once told me, "I think the world of your nephew. 
When he comes by, he always finds a few minutes 
to stop and talk to me." 

Music, you may know, played an important part 
in Warren's career. It was the famous baritone John 
Charles Thomas who suggested Warren leave the 
Eastman School of Music (Continued on page 97) 



Warren Hull emcees Strike It Rich — seen on CBS-TV, M-F, at 
11:30 A.M., and Wed., at 9 P.M.— heard over NBC Radio, 
M-F, at 11 A.M.— all EOT, for Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 






LOOKING 
HOMEWARD 



Wawen's biggest moments: With his mother, visiting the house where he was born . 



Old swimming hole: Warren shows daughter Sally and the neighbor- 
hood children where he used to splash around when he was a youngster. 




dedicating the new Gosport firehouse (sons Paul and George standing at far right, just behind little Sail 



End of a wonderful day: A happy homecomer reminisces 
with his wife Sue, mother Laura, and aunt Ruth Harkness. 



adults— pitched into the work of putting spokes in 
wheels or working a drill. Warren in his teen years 
was to work for a time at the punch presses and 
lathes, but his handiness came out much earlier. 

The home where Warren spent most of his child- 
hood stUl boasts the same rose arbors Warren con- 
structed when he was twelve years old. He buUt 
his own wagons, toboggan, skis, and ambitiously 
finished a boat, the Swan. The Swan, it is sad to 
tell, when hauled to the dammed-up creek, imme- 
diately capsized. But Warren was learning to be 
self-sufficient. He knows what workclothes feel 
uke and he knows the fed of honest sweat. I think 
he would have been taught these things even if his 
• father had been wealthy. But, to be realistic, the 
Hull brothers in those early days never drew more 
than iive dollars at a tiine from the business, and 
">at was for groceries and essentials. 

Warren was taught by his father that a person 
should always be so upright that he can look any 
Tu ' ^^^" * stranger, straight in the eyes. He was 
™d about human dignity and the dependency of 
one man upon another. I remember a workman 
?5pe told me, "I think the world of your nephew, 
ynen he comes by, he always finds a few minutes 
™ stop and talk to me." 

• w ^'''' ^'°^ ""^y know, played an important part 

® Warren's career. It was the famous baritone John 

narles Thomas who suggested Warren leave the 

•^stman School of Music (Continued on page 97) 



11 iT".'" """"^^^ Strike It Rich-seen on CBS-TV, M-F, at 
■w AM., and Wed., at 9 P.M.— heard over NBC Radio, 
"'■ "t 11 A.M.— all EOT, for Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 



rairss-'ssr. 





IT'S A 



A YEAR AGO, he was on the morning radio show with the other 
Little Godfreys, but nobody'd seen hide nor hair of him on 
TV. People asked why; he told 'em. 
"Mr. Godfrey knows when I'll be ready. I'm still gawky, 
nothing professional about me. . . ." 

Today, he's a television star, but no more "professional," 
if to be professional is to have the slick, hard finish,' the 
high gloss, the air of being unerringly right. 

Take a show he did this past June. Thirty million people 
watching, that Wednesday night, and Jiilius fluffed. Came in two 
measures too soon on the introduction to his song. He 
didn't brazen it through; he quit cold, (Continued on page 94) 

.lulius La Rosa sings on Arthur Godfrey Time, heard Mon. through Fri., on 
CBS Radio, 10 to 11:30 A.M. (seen Mon. through Thurs., on CBS-TV, 10-11), 
for Kleenex, Snow Crop, Star-Kist, Fiberglas, Frigidaire, Pepsodent, Nabisco, 
Pillsbury, Toni, Chesterfield— also Arthur Godfrey And His Friends, CBS-TV, 
Wed., at 8 P.M., for Chesterfield Cigarettes, Toni, and Pillsbury. All EDT. 



Julius LaRosa 
has everything 
he ever wanted- 
and more, too 



By CHRIS KANE 



W 



Godfrey's the greatest, in Julius's 
honor roll. And why not? In just two 
whirlwind years, he handed the world 
to vounq La Rosa on o lonq-ter 







GRAND YOUNG LIFE! 




Fame has broughf Julius rewards which he fully (and 
modestly) appreciates: The adulation of many fans . . . 
meetings face-to-face with his own idol, Perry Como 
. . . fun-filled holidays in Florida . . . and friends galore. 





■ ■ ■ " 





AYKA.R AGO, he was on the morninR radio show with the other 
L.ttU. Godfreys, but nobo<i.vd seen hide nor hair of him on 
IV. Pfoplo nsked why; he told 'em, 
"Mr. Godfrey knows when I'll be ready, I'm still gawky 
nothing professional about nie. , . ." 

Today, he's a television star, but no more "professional " 
if to be profe.-isional is to have the slick, hard finish the' 
high gloss, the air of being unerringly right 

Take a .show he did this past June. Thirty million oeonle 
watohmg. that Wednesday night, and Julius fluffed. Came in two 
measures loo soon on the introduction to his song He 
d.dn t braten it through; he quit cold. ( Cou.i,u.ed o,. page 94) 

.liiliu» l.n R(wn sin^-s on Arthur GoHfrrv Time hr.M \l«„ .1. l ^ 

.:n.'^ R«.ii., 10 ,„ UM .^.M. ,.„„ m„„. ,1 ,h tk^,^ „„ fet \'L7 

lor Kicfnrv. Snow Crop, Sur-Kisi KIIktbIil. Kri„ I 1, ^"'^~^- ^O-H). 

«v.i„ ., H ,.,M„ ,„.. (,...„«.,, ti««r.„:"-r:!..":i»f„[,-,:;^'';,f |Tv. 



IT'S A 



Julius LaRosa 
has everything 
he ever wanted — 
and more, too 

By CHRIS KANE 



Godfrey's the greatest, in Julius's 
honor roll. And why not? In just two 
whirlwind years, he handed the world 
to young La Rosa on a long-term lease. 



GRAND YOUNG LIFE! 




Fame has brought Julius rewards which he fully (and 
modestly) appreciates: The adulation of many fans . . , 
meetings face-to-face with his own idol, Perry Como 
. . . fun-filled holidays in Florida . . . and friends galore. 



Ill 






!^ 




SIS CAMP 



By ANNE HAYNES 



SIS Camp had just slipped back into 
her dungarees after trying on a skirt 
she was sewing. Outside, the wind 
was howling around the Pohlkamp 
household, for it was November and the 
Cincinnati winter had set in. Sis could 
hear her father and her two brothers 
talking in the living room and her mother 
was in the kitchen, tidying up after 
their dish-washing session. 

The telephone (Continued on page 89) 



Sis Camp is seen on the Paul Dixon Show, Du Mont 
TV, M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, under multiple sponsorship. 



No jealous members in this Cinderella's family! Father arid brothers Joe (seated), Jack and Dick 
(standing) take great pride in her success. Mother helps make the clothes that transform a 
dungareed duckling Into a sleek swan — and Cinderella herself still likes to work in the kitchen. 





uis never dreamed a phone call would change the 

whole course of her life In less than 24 hours! 



38 




'^ 



«v>. 





0, 




MBJL 




the phrasEi 



Red's a human dynamo 
who has developed 

a philosophy that makes 
life very satisfying 

By MARTIN COHEN 




Family candids: Wife Fleurette is better 
known as Flippy . . . daughter Susan has musical] 
talent like her song-writing dad ... son 
Stephen's a rip-roqring chip off the old block! 



L 



khat pays for RED BENSON 





After years in show business. Red revels in country life, is proud of the innprovements he's nnode around 

their ranch home, proud of his gardening and carpentry — and the calluses which prove he did it with his own hands. 



Hard to believe but he plays as hard as he works, has 
many hobbies, Including a prized miniature auto collection. 



1IKE FIRE from the stack of a locomotive, that 
. flaming mop on Red Benson's head indicates 
the same thing: a very much alive, furiously 
working dynamo. Red, who enjoys giving away 
a quarter-million dollars' worth of prizes a year 
on quiz shows, is friendly and relaxed as an emcee 
but seldom slows down to less than a sprint. 

"When Red goes to sleep at nights," his wife 
says, "he doesn't really quit. He just kind of 
banks the fire for a few hours." 

The bespectacled star has at various times in 
his Life been a prizefighter, milkman, bandleader, 
night watchman, fireman, advertising man, 
hypnotist, singer, actor, and comedian. 

"But everyone refused to caU me 'Red,' " he 
says. "That was something I really had to 
work for." 

He was bom Norman Benson in Columbvis, 
Ohio. 

He would introduce {Continued on page 100) 



Red Benson emcees The Phrase That Pays, NBC Radio, M-F, 
11:30 A.M., for Colgate-Palmolive-Peet— Name That Tune, 
-heard on NBC Radio, Fri., 8:30 P.M., and seen on NBC-TV, 
Mon., at 8 P.M.— Take A Number, Mutual, Fri., at 8 P.M. 
—Great Day Show, Mutual, Fri., 9:05 P.M. All times EDT. 




I 



'^^ 



*;af 



tomorrow 



''qp*- 



^'U'lS 






4 



m 



'. «. 




iU 



The Bergmans wondered, as Joanne Barron and Arthur Tate chi 



AT THE PARTY the Bergmans were giving, 
Joanne Barron could feel herself being 
pulled against her will toward Arthur Tate. 
Arthur— with his crisp, black, wavy hair, his 
almost-pure Irish grin— was enough to melt any 
woman's heart. Almost like a ghost rising be- 
tween them, however, was the memory of Keith. 
. . . Joanne thought back on those carefree days 
when she had first responded to Keith's love. He, 
too, had had winning ways about him, ways 
which had made a happy life seem within easy 
grasp. However, the months and years of her 
marriage had revealed to Joanne that there was 
more to building a life than just appearances. 



She had faced the problem of Irene Barron, a 
mother-in-law who was possessive to the point 
of weakening and destroying her own son with 
her demands. . . . Now, even closer since Keith's 
death, was the problem of Joanne's daughter, 
Patti. A court case had had to be fought for 
Patti's custody against Keith's mother, Irene — 
and, in fighting for Patti's custody, it looked as 
though Joanne had lost Patti's love and respect. 
Missing the firm hand of her father, Patti was 
finding her young world difficult. Then, too, 
Patti's grandmother had done everything in her 
power to poison Patti's mind against Joanne, . . . 
Watching Arthur talking quietly in a corner of 



42 



i^ 







ii 




V 



u 



msmt- 



mi^ 



Could it be a budding romance? Joanne was wondering, too. 



the room with the Bergmans, Joanne was struck 
by his apparent quiet strength. In the past few 
weeks, Arthur had been taking a firm hand with 
Patti, an intelligent and forceful manner with 
business, too, leaving Joanne to pick up the 
threads of her life which had been tangled by 
her emotional experiences with her ex-mother- 
in-law in her fight for Patti. . . . For an idle 
moment, Joanne lost herself in reverie — ^thought: 
Is it possible to live and bring up a child properly 
without a husband and father? What do I really 
feel about Arthur? Could I fall in love again? 
Before she had time to figure out her reply, she 
saw Arthur rise and come toward her. After all, 



he has never mentioned marriage, she reminded 
herself. Well, let time take care of these little 
problems. . . . Arthur leaned down to help her 
get up. "Penny for your thoughts," he whispered. 
"Don't have any," Joanne replied airily, "except — 
let's say good night to the Bergmans, for to- 
morrow is another day." 



Search For Tomorrow is on CBS-TV, M-F, 12:30 P.M. 
EDT, for Spic & Span, Cheer, Joy, and Shasta. Shown in 
their original roles are Mary Stuart and Terry O'Sullivan 
as Joanne Barron and Arthur Tate (above), and Melba 
Rae and Larry Haines as the Bergmans (center, left). 










1^ 



■i*f^< 







■I,: 



The Bergmans wondered, as Joanne Barron and Arthur Tate cW "V- Could it be a budding romance? Joanne was wondering, too. 



AT THE PARTY the Bergmans were giving, 
Joanne Barron could feel herself being 
■ pulled against her will toward Arthur Tate. 
Aithur — with his crisp, black, wavy hair, his 
almost-pure Irish grin — was enough to melt any 
woman's heart. Ahnost like a ghost rising be- 
tween them, however, was the memory of Keith. 
. . . Joanne thought back on those carefree days 
when she had first responded to Keith's love. He, 
too, had had winning ways about him, ways 
which had made a happy life seem within easy 
grasp. However, the months and years of her 
marriage had revealed to Joanne that there was 
more to building a life than just appearances. 



She had faced the problem of Irene Barron, a 
mother-in-law who was possessive to the point 



of weakening and destroying her own son 



with 



her demands. . . . Now, even closer since Keith s 
death, was the problem of Joanne's daughter, 
Patti. A court case had had to be fought for 
Patti's custody against Keith's mother, I""^^ 
and, in fighting for Patti's custody, it looked as 
though Joanne had lost Patti's love and respect- 
Missing the firm hand of her father, Patti w^ 
finding her young world difficult. Then, ' ' 
Patti's grandmother had done everything in "e 
power to poison Patti's mind against Joanne. • -^j 
Watching Arthur talking quietly in a corner 



fte room with the Bergmans, Joanne was struck 
hy his apparent quiet strength. In the past few 
weeks, Arthur had been taking a firm hand with 



Patti 



1. an intelligent and forceful manner with 



business, too, leaving Joaime to pick up the 
^■eads of her life which had been tangled by 
Jier emotional experiences with her ex-mother- 
•n-law in her fight for Patti. ... For an idle 
jnoment, Joanne lost herself in reverie— thought: 
"'possible to live and bring up a child properly 
^tthout a husband and father? What do I really 
'eel about Arthur? Could I fall in love again? 
eJore she had time to figure out her reply, she 
aw Arthur rise and come toward her. After oil, 



he has never tnentioTied marriage, she reminded 
herself. Well, let time take care of these little 
problems. . . . >lrthur leaned down to help her 
get up. "Penny for your thoughts," he whispered. 
"Don't have any," Joanne replied airily, "except — 
let's say good night to the Bergmans, for to- 
morrow is another day." 



Search For Tomorrow is on CBS-TV, M-F, 12:30 P.M. 
EDT, for Spic & Span, Cheer, Joy, and Shasta. Shown in 
their original roles are Mary Stuart and Terry O'Sullivan 
as Joanne Barron and Arthur Tate (above), and Melba 
Rae and Larry Haines as the Bergmans (center, left). 




Mrs. Arthur Murray • 
once thought of herself 
as an ugly duckling! 
Nothing could be 
further from the truth 

By GREGORY MERWIN 



Arthur and Ka+hryn Murray built a big business out of dancing. But business 

to them isn't schools— it's people. Their interest in others is reflected in their TV Party 

featuring such distinguished guest stars as Hoagy Carmichoel and Larry Storch. 






from Wallflower 




Shyness is something both the Hurrays knew personally — and learned to conquer. Kathryn made 

sure that their two daughters never suffered the despair she herself felt in her teens. And grandchildren 

Martha and Kathryn will eventually benefit from the same wise advice she gives in these pages. 



^ 



ONE OF video's most enchanting and gracious 
ladies is Kathryn Murray, femcee of the 
Arthvu- Murray Party, over CBS-TV, and 
wife of the famous dancing master. This glamorous 
grandmother is rated by men and women alike as 
one of the most attractive women to smile from 
their picture tubes. But Kathryn herself says, "I'm 
just the ugly duckling who learned how to get 
along with people." 

Kathryn's knowledge of what makes a man or 
woman successful is based on her experience as a 
business woman, TV celebrity, and partner in a 
28-year marriage. She has observed thousands of 
students going through the Murray dance courses, 
arid these have included celebrities ranging from 
comic Groucho Marx to beauties like Jngrid Berg- 
man and notables such as the Duke of Windsor and 
Eleanor Roosevelt. And (Continued cm page 86) 



The Arthur Murray Party is seen on CBS-TV, Sun., 9:30 
P.M. EDT, for Ipana A/C and other Bristol-Myers products. 




to ORCHID 



45 



Barbara Britton and her family have experienced 

laughter, tears, and a happy time in living 

"We're all pulling togethef 




Dating at home, Barbara romps with daughter Cris, 
son Teddy, and Saint, the Great Dane. Dining out, she 
shares hillbilly chow (at Giro's!) with .husband Gene. 




By ELIZABETH MILLS 

FOR A LONG minute, the telephone rang on 
the other end of the line. Barbara Britton 
was about to give up when suddenly a 
childish voice carefully answered, "Hello, this 
is Dr. Czukor's residence!" 

"My goodness, Teddy, is that you?" laughed 
Barbara. "This is Monuny. What are you 
doing answering the phone?" 

"Hello, Mommy," said the youngster. "Every- 
body is out cutting down the ivy. I thought 
I could at least help by answering the phone. 
After all, I'm a part {Continued on page 83) 



Mr. and Mrs. North— CBS-TV, Fri., 10 P.M.— CBS Radio, 
Tues., 8:30 P.M.— both EDT, for Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. 




Mr. and Mrs. North of the airwaves introduce 
their real-life children — Barbara's boy,' Teddy, ' 
meets Richard Denning's own little girl, Diane. 




Anne and godson Carl Gathers use an "antique" 
1929 Ford to landscape the lovejy grounds — where 
Anne and Violet serve, many aa outdoor feast. 




EXCITIXG LADY 




By GLADYS HALL 

ONE THOUSAND Kules from nowhere is not 
Outer Space, but the location of Stella 
Dallas' home — that is, the home of the 
vivacious, enthusiastic Anne Elstner who is 
Stella Dallas both on radio and in real life. Here 
the local townfolk call Anne "Stella" and 
bring their problems to her for talking over. 
Here is the two-hundred-year-old stone house 
which she and Jack and Violet call home. 
Here, too, is a lake over a hundred feet long 
and fifty feet wide. 

The house is built of quarry stone which has 
mellowed and rosed with age. Twenty-three 
acres of lush New Jersey farmland spread 
their green skirts aroimd it. Tall evergreens — 
graceful hemlocks, white and Scotch pines 
and a towering Norway spruce— guard the fine 
old doorway. "So far, the only name we have 
for it is 'Home,' " Anne says. 

Jack (John Matthews, Jr.) is Anne's 
"wonderful" husband, and has been for twenty- 
eight years. Violet Anderson has worked for 
and with the Matthews' almost a quarter of 
a century. Anne "found" Violet in New York, 
but Violet was actually bom in Maryland, 
just twenty miles from where Jack himself 

Stella Dallas is heard on NBC Radio, M-F, 4:15 P.M. 
EDT, for Phillips' Milk of Magnesia, Bayer Aspirin. 



IKE THE WONDERFUL WOMAN SHE PLAYS, ANNE ELSTNER CAN TACKLE 



48 




I ^/. 






I 



::^ 




/^. 



I. ^ 



''^P'-^-r. 






Towering trees guard the doorway where "Stella" and husband 
Jock Matthews greet their guests. Below, Anne loves perfume and 
feminine frills, as well as garden chores and country sports. 




ANY PROBLEM AND ENJOYS A BUSY LIFE 




km*V.-^?^. 



z'^: 






/ 






r 



"Matthews Lake" is really the old quarry from which the stone came, ages ago, for Anne's and Jack's 
gracious house. It's perfect for swimming and canoeing — and there's plenty of fish to rise to the bait. 



was born. She is very much part of the household. 

"The day Jack and I first saw the old stone 
house, we threw pebbles in the lake," Anne says, 
"and the bass just swarmed and grabbed. Jack 
just swallowed. 'You go in and look at the house, 
baby,' he said in his Southern accent that is thick 
as syrup, 'I don't need to look at it. I like this 
place,' he said, his eyes shining. 'It suits me fine.' 

"It suited me fine, too, but before I would say, 
'We'll buy,' I went back to town and checked with 
Violet. 'Now, Violet,' I said, 'we have found this 
place we love but we're not going to buy it until 
you see it and say you love it, too. We won't go 
without you.' 

"We didn't have to. Violet's as happy here as 
we are. She has the run of the house. She has her 
friends in. She fishes. She goes up to broadcasts 
with me. When, recently, she had a cornea trans- 
plant, everyone around NBC wrote her letters. 
After my sixteen years of playing Stella Dallas 
over NBC Radio, Violet's better known around 
the studio," Anne laughs, "than I am!" 

Fourth member of the household is Anne's god- 
son, Carl Cathers, whom Anne has helped to edu- 
cate. "He's just graduated from Rutgers Uni- 
versity,".Anne says proudly. "He's with us a great 
deal of the time, and has done such beautiful stone 
and landscape work in our yard and garden. Of 
course, he enjoys the place with us and so takes 
great pride in all our work and plans for it. To- 
gether we plant and transplant, excavate and fill 
in, and almost move mountains — think we would 



try to move one, if we knew where to put it!" 
Anne keeps a list in her mind, and in her heart, 
which she calls "The Things I'm Proudest Of": 
Her father's poems. Her mother's letters. The old 
silver from both Jack's and Anne's grandparents. 
The exquisite hand -painted paper doUs her sisters 
made for her when she was a little girl. High on 
this long and loving list is the role she has made 
her own: 

"I'm proud of Stella Dallas," she says. "It's a 
terrific responsibility to live up to such a wonder- 
ful person, but it's also a challenge to the best in 
me, and I try to meet it. I particularly love it 
when Stella reads the Scriptures and know, from 
the reaction I get, that all of Stella's friends love 
it, too. One of these days I would like to do a 
whole program of readings from the Scriptures — 
if ever I achieve this ambition it will be another 
of The Things I'm Proudest Of." 

ON THE lake which mirrors the old stone house, 
there are two canoes. In the morning before 
she leaves for New York to become Stella Dallas — 
her "other self" — ^slender, blonde, blue-eyed Anne 
walks around the place. 

"I garden, even in the rain. I love gardening 
and sharing the flowers with neighbors. Love to 
wear flowers, too, and always do. I use basic hats 
and each day I have a different floral arrangement 
on my hat. 'You picked a pretty hat today!' my 
director recently remarked. They're known around 
the studio as my 'hat-gardens,' and I often allow 



50 



STELLA DALLAS 




Flowers are dear to Anne's heart. She enjoys growing them, for their beauty in 
both garden and home — and trims her most fashionable hats with living blossoms. 



one of the men in the studio to pick a posy for his 
button-hole! In the winter I often wear pine 
cones," Anne laughs, "on my mink hat!" 

"Weekends, Jack and I do together all the things 
we love the most. We swim. We ride. We fish. 
We garden. We cook (we give Violet every week- 
end ofiF) — we both love to cook. We go to our local 
baseball games. Jack could have made profes- 
sional baseball, which is on my list of Things I'm 
Proudest Of — also a mite jealous of! All my life 
I wamted to be a ballplayer. 

"In the wintertime, we trap-shoot. Another 
Thing I'm Proudest Of is Jack's first trophy for 
trap-shooting; a little proud because he lets me 
shoot with some of the world's greatest shots (even 
though I'm sometimes the only woman). Among 
Jack's skills as a marksman is that of throwing 
coins into the air and shooting them down. Our 
friends refer to us as," Anne laughs, " 'Anne Elst- 
ner and Her Penny -Shooting Husbeind!' 

"Getting a man is easy, I always say," Anne 
does say, with a twinkle, "but keeping him — that's 
the thing you have to work at! Since no man is 
going to take up a woman's interests, the way to 
'work at it' is, in my opinion, for the woman to take 
up the man's interests. In this respect, I was lucky. 
Born with the love of the outdoors in my blood, 
I didn't have to 'take up' Jack's interests; they 
were already mine. Meaning that — just as Jack 
is as much at home in the woods, in the fields, on a 
horse, in the water, on a baseball diamond, as in a 
drawing-room — so am I! {Continued on page 76) 




Violet's speciolty is Southern-fried chicken, but ner 
fish is appetizing, too — and as fresh as can be caught! 



51 




"Paul and 

Peter are learning to 

share everything." 



OUR LITTLE MARGIE SA YS: 



^i'm in love with four guys'' 



By GALE STORM 



1 REMEMBER One day in Texas, when I was 
about fifteen, I asked my mother: "Mother, am 
I pretty?" 
"Gale, honey," she said, "you're cute as a rosebud 
garden. But I think you'll get over it. I say 
that because you have a disposition which goes 
hand in glove with ham hocks, com bread, 
mustard greens, and (Continued on page 98) 



^% 






■?ii'^ 



Ai^i^f:! 




"It's easy to love my brood — like Phil 
with his date, Susan Thayer — like Lee, my husband." 



My Little Margie, CBS Radio, Sun., 8:30 
P.M. EDT, for Philip Morris Cigarettes. 



53 



Marjorie, Christopher, Lynn (with little Ti Mambo) and Mark are 

the very wonderful reasons why Karl Weber would rather be home than anything. 




MAN ABOUT THE 



54 



Karl Weber, who 
i rivals Lorenzo Jones for 

Belle's affections, is 
^ just a family man at heart 




Sophisticated Verne Massey of radio 
would hardly recognize himself, cutting 
some five tons of stone for the walls! 



By FRANCES KISH 



DOWN A CERTAIN Ncw Jersey road, 
across the Hudson River from New 
York City, live Karl Weber and 
his family. In New York, Karl is known 
as playwright Verne Massey, whom he 
portrays in the dramatic radio serial 
Lorenzo Jones. Hjirdly the type to get his 
hands dirty doing coiintry chores! 

However, once shed of the distinctly 
urban clothes which characterize this tall, 
dark, good-looking man when he plays 
Massey, and dressed in jeans and a sport 
shirt, Karl is not only one to get his hands 
dirty, but he's a person who loves *it. 

"When we moved (Continued on page 78) 

Karl Weber in Lorenzo Jones, on NBC Radio, M-F, 
5:30 P.M. EDT, for Fab and Colgate Denul Cream. 



HOUSE 




Both from Iowa themselves, Karl and Mar\ are still 
genuine "country kids" and enjoy teaching their own city- 
bred children the real down-on-the-farm way of living. 




Christopher gets a kick out of learning the 

old-fashioned skills which will — some far-off day — make him 

a handy man to have around his own home, like Dad. 




We won $1800— and didn't 
have a dime to tip the messengers 
dehvering us congratulations ! 




By SIBYL LANGE 





TWOW 



THE TRUTH of the matter is that we didn't 
have enough money on hand to tip the 
Western Union messengers who walked 
up four flights of stairs to deliver messages 
congratulating us because we won $1800 on 
Two For The Money. We had been kind of 
"broke" that week and, of course, we ran 
rampant after winning the money, and my 
husband Jack took my mother and a friend 
of hers and me out for double malteds. 

That's kind of cheating, beginning at the 
end of a rather hectic and funny story. You 
see. Jack and I had been married only seven 
months. He is studying medicine at Cornell, 
and I work there as a laboratory technician. 
The business of being broke doesn't mean 
that we are poverty-stricken. Some Aveeks 



II 



Jack's a medical student, I'm a laboratory technician-^so a 
home game of chess just about fits our "entertainment" buclget. 



56 




the MON E Y 



f^ 



Our winnings mean so much to our future, but all we 
have bought is — that irresistible "dog in the window." 



our budget just stiffers from a lack of green 
corpuscles. 

But that still isn't getting to the real story. 
How we got on Two For The Money is quite 
simple — we wrote in for tickets to Balance 
Your Budget. That's as clear as mud, but 
true. However, I'll stick to the facts and 
maybe we'U come out right in the end. You 
see, it was suggested that, when writing 
Balance Your Budget, you mention an amus- 
ing incident in your life. Jack did that, 
explaining that my father was instrumental 
in bringing lis (Continued on page 95) 

Two For The Money can be heard on NBC Radio. 
Tues., at 10 P.M., and will be seen over CBS-TV, Sat., 
at 9 P.M.— both EDT, for Old Gold Ciearettes. 




We won $1800— and didn't 
have a dime to tip the messengers 
delivering us congratulations! 




By SIBYL LANGE 





TWO for 



THE TRUTH of the matter is that we didn't 
have enough money on hand to tip the 
Western Union messengers who walked 
up four flights of stairs to deliver messages 
congratulating us because we won $1800 on 
Two For The Money. We had been kind of 
"broke" that week and, of course, we ran 
rampant after winning the money, and my 
husband Jack took my mother and a friend 
of hers and me out for double malteds. 

That's kind of cheating, beginning at the 
end of a rather hectic and funny story. You 
see, Jack and I had been married only seven 
months. He is studying medicine at Cornell, 
and I work there as a laboratory technician. 
The business of being broke doesn't mean 
that we are poverty-stricken. Some weeks 



Jack's o medical student, I'm a laboratory technician— ^-so a 
home gome of chess just about fits our "entertainment" buciget. 



I 



the MONEY 



our budget just suffers from a lack of green 
corpuscles. 

But that stUI isn't getting to the real story. 
How we got on Two For The Money is quite 
simple— we wrote in for tickets to Balance 
Your Budget. That's as clear as mud, but 
true. However, I'll stick to the facts and 
maybe we'll come out right in the end. You 
see, it was suggested that, when writing 
Balance Your Budget, you mention an amus- 
ing incident in your life. Jack did that, 
explaining that my father was instrumental 
w bringing us (Continued on page 95) 

Two For The Money can be heard on NBC Radio, 
'ues., at 10 P.M., and will be seen over CBS-TV, Sat, 
"' ' PM— both EDT, for Old Gold Ciparette.«. 




I found a Wonderful Man 



We think we have wonderful children, too — our daughter, Linda Anne, and son Galen Spencer, 



r.:'^mm 



] 



#? 



^ 



v^il 




■>*" 



i 




My husband, Galen Drake, has 
found contentment in 
accomplishing the things he 
wanted to do . . . deep 
contentment in his family 

By ANNE DRAKE 



MY HUSBAND, Galen Drake, is on radio on his 
own programs not less than sixteen or 
seventeen times a week. Sometimes even 
more than that. I, Anne Drake, am a Powers 
model, which was what I was doing before I met 
Galen. Yet, in spite of our busy lives, we live 
a wonderful home life with our two children 
and are a contented and happy family. 

I Uke to think that it is some of our happiness 
which spills over into Galen's programs and 
inspires so many people to write him that he 
has made their lives a little brighter. His love 
for us — although he does not mention his 
family very often on his programs — and his 
love for people in {Continued on page 101) 



Galen Drake is heard- cm CBS Radio, Sat., at 10 
A.M., for Hunt Club Dog Food (and others), and 
at 1:55 P.M., for Instant Sanka— on WCBS Radio (N.Y.), 
Mon. through Fri., 4:30 P.M., Sat., 9:30 A.M., for the 
Housewives Protective League — also on WCBS he does 
a newscast, Mon. through Fri., 5 P.M., and Starlight 
Salute, seven days a week, 11:15 P.M. All EDT. 




Galen reads constantly, of course, and 
I try to be of help. But I won't say we 
work together — because, according to his 
philosophy, what he's doing isn't "work," 
any more than playing with the children! 






I. Condemned to die! Danny Lockwood's life 
hangs in the balance. Only Governor Miles 
Nelson can stay the execution, already set. 



OVER THE past few years, Carolyn Nelson has dis- 
covered that being the wife of Governor Miles 
Nelson is not simple. Facing her now, however, 
is a situation without parallel in most women's lives. 
Carolyn is convinced of the innocence of a boy named 
Danny Lockwood, who faces execution as the result of 
his conviction in a court of law. In the hands of her 
husband rests the fate of Danny ... he can either sign 
away Danny's right of appeal, or call for a stay of 
execution to examine more evidence which might be 
presented. Weary, strained to the emotional breaking 
point, Carolyn knows there is little hope of new 
evidence turning up which wUl delay his decision. 
Perhaps, during this delay, some new facts will come 




2. Carolyn Nelson doesn't believe Danny is 
guilty — particularly after a stranger stops 
her and roughly warns her not to interfere. 



to light. As a woman, as a wife, CaroljTi knows that 
she is pushing Miles against his will . . . yet, as a 
woman and a wife, she is forced to plead for Danny, 
no matter what it may cost in her relationship with 
her husband. Miles is not one to hide his emotions too 
completely, and it is with obvious resentment that he 
agrees to Carolyn's plea for time. However, he refuses 
to listen to what he considers utter nonsense: Carolyn's 
revelation that she has been threatened on the street. 
With a woman's instinct — and not much more — to back 
it up, Carolyn is convinced that there is political 
pressure being exerted to send Danny to the chair 
immediately . . . perhaps the same group of people 
exercising political pressure on her husband in every 



CAROLYN NELSON MUST ALWAYS BE TRUE TO HERSELF— EVEN IF IT MEANS 



60 







^m^ 







cC 




3. Carolyn pleods with her husband, Miles, who doesn't believe Danny is 
innocent — and doesn't even believe her story about the stranger's threats! 



See Next Page ^ 

SACRIIICING HER HUSBAND'S LOVE WHICH SHE HOLDS SO DEAR 



61 




RIGHT TO HAPPINESS 



AUGUST 



f ] 


K^i?3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


'! 1 


II 


12 


13 


14 


15 


'4i 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


i^ ^ 


^Mk."^ 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 



,4. Miles broods about the constant pressure 
he's subjected to. Everyone wants something — 
even his wife. Is there anyone her can trust? 





6, Yes, Annette wants sonnething, too. She has 
her own reasons for sending Miles out of town 
the very week that Danny is scheduled to die. 



5. Even Annette Thorpe, to whom he turns in 
his bitterness, begs him" to make a state-wide 
campaign for her Better Government Committee. 



decision he tries to make for the good of the state. 
Miles derides Carolyn's belief that anyooe influential 
cares one way or the other about Danny. However, he 
admits that three men, Lassiter, Davis, and Conklin, 
have been exerting great pressure on matters which are 
coming before the legislature. Emotionally, Miles feels 
that he is being pulled and hauled in every direction. 
He is learning, the hard way, that one in public life 
cannot be a rugged individualist who stands and falls on 
what he believes ... he must rightly interpret the con- 
flicting wishes of others, weigh them, and decide on the 
side which will dp "the most good for the greatest num- 



i\ 



1 iiaaai 



62 



7. Carolyn receives an anonymous threot — which she's sure only Annette could have sent. 
Miles is far fronn convinced. He has nnore faith in Annette than in the wife who loves him. 



ber. It is natural for him to feel that, since his own wife 
Carolyn is responsible for so much of the emotional 
turmoil, he must find peace and comfort elsewhere. An- 
nette Thorpe is there to see that Miles has a champion 
and a supporter in whatever direction he turns. Annette 
is the kind of woman who can make a man feel he is" 
directing, when actually she is leading. Carolyn is weU 
aware of this situation, but she must be honest with 
herself and, even if it means driving her husband into 
the arms of Annette, she cannot help herself. . . . For- 
timately for Carolyn, Miles doubts even Annette, al- 
though he is loath to show it. Annette urges him to 



accept the invitation of the Committee for Better Gov- 
ernment to make a speaking tour of the state. In her 
mind, now is the time for her to drive the final wedge 
between Carolyn and Miles — if she is ever going to be 
able to do it. . . . Then comes the matter of an anonymous 
letter which Carolyn receives. The contents of the let- 
ter are such that Carolyn is convinced only Annette 
could have written it. Honest, forthright, but actually 
fearing the resvdt, Carolyn voices her suspicions to Miles. 
Miles decides he will put an end to his doubting, once 
and for all. He assigns a detective to follow Carolyn to 
see if she is being honest about being threatened ... if 



See Next Page ^ 



63 




RIGHT TO HAPPINESS 



9. Triumphantly, Annette sees Miles off on his tour, sur«^ 
she- has driven a wedqe between Miles and Carolyn forever.' 



8. Still refusing to interfere in Danny's case, Miles 
won't sign the papers which would delay the execution. 



64 








10. Alone, Carolyn faces the result of her fight to save Danny. If, by any miracle, she could 
still win, nnight it not be at the cost of her husband's political future — or their marriage itself? 



the detective actually sees the encounter, Miles will be- 
lieve that Carolyn is telling the truth — might even go 
so far as to beheve Annette could have written the 
letter. On the afternoon when Miles is to decide 
'whether or not to take the state-wide tour, Carolyn 
deliberately courts trouble and allows herself to be 
accosted. She knows the detective is following her and 
assumes he's seen the encounter. . . . Unfortiinately, 
the press of the crowd is such that the detective sees 
absolutely nothing. When Carolyn tells Miles — MUes, 
bewildered, angry, feeling completely betrayed by 
Carolyn, refuses to beUeve anything she has said. He 
boards his train for the state-wide tovu- in behalf of 
the Committee for Better Government, cenvinced his 
only supporter is Annette. Carolyn, almost at her wits' 
end, knows that she has driven her husband too far, but 
she is powerless to do anything about it. . . . Her only 
ray of hope now is that Miles has gone o£E without tak- 
ing any action on Danny's appeal — ^neither signed it, 



nor rejected it — and perhaps, with a little time on her 
side, she will be able to save Danny. Perhaps time, too, 
wUl help reveal Annette to MUes. Carolyn can only 
fall back on the belief that a marriage built on a strong 
fovmdation will last, no matter what tests it may en- 
counter along the way. 



Pictured here, in their original roles, are: 

Carolyn -Nelson Claudia Morgan 

Miles Nelson John Larkin 

Annette Thorpe Gertrude Warner 

Danny Lockwood Bob Hastings 

The Right To Happiness is heard over NBC Radio, M-F, 3 :45 
P.M. EDT. It is sponsored by the Procter & Gamble Company. 



65 




m 



Johnny lives in a trailer 

with his two children 
and a wife who believes he 

should be everybody's choice 

By PAULINE SWANSON 



Johnny Dugan - Ladies' Choice 




Plenty of room and love, even for pets, and never any fighting — except, of course, on a purely man-to-man basis 



JOHNNY DuGAN is a blue-eyed, black-haired, thirty-two-year-old 
Boston Irishman with a lyric tenor voice which would melt the 
hardest heart. 
By virtue of these assets, he is the star of Ladies' Choice, heard on 
Monday afternoons on NBC-TV, with a rapidly soaring rating which 
indicates that he is on the way to becoming the ladies' 
choice himself. 

His salary — which only a couple of years ago hardly justified that 
word, when he was "buckin' for jobs, night-club casuals mostly" — has 
inched into the four-iigvires-weekly bracket, and it would be fair 
to say that young Mr. Dugan has arrived. 

It is sxuprising, in the face of these statistics, {Continued on page 72) 



Johnny Dugan is the singing emcee of Ladies' Choice, NBC-TV, M-F, 4:30 P.M. EDT. 




^'My Secret of Happiness 



ff 



As both pretty actress 
and practical grandmother, 
Spring Byington has her 
own way of meeting — and 
defeating — life's problems 




Spring Byington can be heard as Lily Ruskin In 
December Bride, on CBS Radio, Sun., 9 P.M. EDT. 




She's long on pa+Iencis, short on time! 

Leisure moments ore spent in knitting, 

finding new games to amuse the children 

— or reading, her own favorite hobby. 



68 



|HH^>^^ ^ ■■ 








^_^^g^y-Y* ^■•^^^^^^^^^^^^^h 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^S^M^k ^ J^^^^^^^^k 






1 




Like Lily Ruskin in December Bride, Spring Byington is the loveliest of nnothers-in-law in real life. 



By BETTY GOODE 



PRETTY, blonde, twice-a-grandmother Spring 
Byington — who gently chides life's vagaries 
each week over CBS Radio's December 
Bride — has a face reflecting, not just what the 
good Lord gave her, but kindness and under- 
standing which she has put there herself. 
Though she was blessed originally with good 
features, it still took years of living and a wealth 
of experience for Spring to grow into the beauti- 
ful woman she is today. 

Happiness to each person means a different 
thing — to Spring, happiness is orderly living, a 



recipe for a way of life, with a few simple in- 
gredients. 

"What I've learned," Spring is apt to contend, 
"is a simple recipe for living — it has to be simple 
because I'm. not too much of a cook. Happiness is 
such an individual problem! Certainly, we're all 
looking for our own particular rainbows — but all 
rainbows are heautifui and, unless we keep our 
eyes on the one that's ours, we'll lose sight of the 
goals we set ourselves. Unless we have some idea 
of where we're going — some order in our think- 
ing-:— we get confused." (Continued on page 84) 



69 




"We're living 



By ELSA MOLINA 



THE PERT blonde singer tapped one foot in 
appreciation of the bouncy song her partner 
was singing. This was the CBS-MBS Curt Mas- 
sey Time with Martha Tilton. Curt and Martha 
were singing: "Oh, come with me, Lucille, in my 
merry Oldsmxthile," and the show was humming 
along in its usual carefree manner — ^almost, that 
is. For, if things had been entirely normal, the 
pert blonde woman would have been tapping 
both feet to their song! 

But one of Martha's feet had temporarily lost 
its tapping ability. It was a foot encased in a 
plaster cast, definitely immobUized*. 

"I know love hits you hard," said liltin' Mar- 
tha Tilton, "but I never expected love to toss me 
a blow hard enough to break my leg! 

"But then I wasn't exactly expecting love! 
Honestly, I had about given it up. It had been 
more than five years since I'd seen a man that I 
thought would interest me romantically. Though 
my friends all said, 'Why, Martha, you're in 
show business; Hollywood is the place where 
good-looking, available men grow like wheat on 
a Kansas farm — with all those big, strong Holly- 
wood actors on the loose, you'll meet plenty 
of men!' 



Martha's broken ankle became a joke to her and husband Jim 
and son Jonathan — but oh, what they thought when it happened! 



Ljove tossed Martha Tilton 

a blow — and 
it couldn't have 
been more welcome 



70 




^^^k 






happily ever after!" 




Pampas, the dog, wos also surprised at Jim — who met Martha on on oirplone assembly line, 
wooed her at high speed — and literally dropped her at the door of their honeymoon cottage. 



"They just don't know the half of it. Five 
shows a week, a home, and two stalwart sons 
to look after, take up the hours in the day like 
my youngsters inhale sodas through a straw. 
The time is there for a few seconds, then like 
the soda — it's gone forever! 

"So, since my divorce five years ago, I've had 
no time for romancing. But every girl dreams. 
Like anything else, if you just do your job and 
work along steady, I've found everything 
comes to him who waits." 

Martha wasn't looking for k)ve, and she 



certainly never expected to meet her man 
while on a publicity trip to the North Ameri- 
can Aviation Company! Nor did she expect to 
fall so hard (in love) that she'd break a leg! 
"You just never know, do you?" smiled 
Martha in her dressing room after the show. 
"Now, take that publicity visit to North Amer- 
ican. Who'd think I'd (Continued on page 88) 

Martha Tilton on Curt Massey Time, heard M-F, on 
CBS Radio, 5:45 P.M. (WCBS Radio, 6:30 P.M.) — 
Mutual, 12 noon— all EDT, for Miles Laboratories. 



71 



Johnny Dugan — Ladies' Choice 



{Continued jrom "page 67) 
to find Mr. Dugan living in a trailer, 
in a Burbank, California, trailer park, with 
his pretty, dark-haired wife, Lorraine . . . 
their nine-year-old son, Jackie . . . daugh- 
ter Gale, who is eight . . . and — hold your 
hats, or better yet, leave them outside, 
please — one aging cocker spaniel, Tafify . . . 
a mother cat and three kittens (two of the 
kittens were given away recently after 
tearful scenes) ... a huge tank of gold- 
fish (you'll find it on top of the 17-inch 
television set) . . . two parakeets and — 
sharing their cage — a baby sparrow whom 
Jackie brought home as a wounded fledg- 
ling and nursed back to health with splints 
and a medicine dropper. 

The Dugans, and menagerie, are not too 
painfully conscious of overcrowding. Their 
trailer home (this one has not yet been 
seasoned on the road) is a luxury job, 
thirty-five feet long, "with everything." 

And, for comparison, "you should have 
caught" its predecessor, a twenty-two- 
footer,-in which only five years ago, John- 
ny, Lorraine, the kids and Taffy conquered 
Donner Pass. But that story will be coming 
up. 

Trailer or not, the Dugans call it home, 
and "home" is an important word to them 
— especially to Lorraine. Johnny was not 
in show business when he met and married 
his darlin', then a Brooklyn model, but in 
the United States Navy, since the year was 
1942. 

But he explained to her at the outset of 
their courtship that he had been enter- 
taining one way or another — for money 
when there was any handy, for fun when 
there was not — ever since he was four. 
Show business was his life and he would be 
heading back to it as soon as the war was 
won. 

That was all right with Lorraine, with 
certain reservations. 

He could have his show business, and 
he didn't have to worry about her wanting 
to get in on the act: 

"I can't sing. I can't dance. I don't tell 
funny stories. And I don't want to learn. 
My job will be keeping our home together. 

"But," added the lady, who has a very 
definite mind of her own, "I'm going to do 
that job. I've read enough about show- 
business marriages to know why so many of 
them fail — the people don't stay together. 

"We're going to stay together, or we're 
not going to get married. That means 
whatever you do, wherever you go — 
me, too — no matter what. When there are 
kids, the kids go, too, no matter what." 

"No matter what," Johnny acceded, and 
the bargain was sealed. 

Radio in Boston, and night clubs in the 
vicinity, were Johnny's first entertainment 
beachheads after his discharge from serv- 
ice in 1945. Which was fortunate — since 
the family which had to stay together "no 
matter what" had expanded now with two 
babies, born sixteen months apart. 

Jackie was three and Gale just under 
two when, late in 1947, Johnny landed his 
first West Coast job, an eight-weeks' run 
in a new George White revue at Holly- 
wood's Florentine Gardens. 

An eight-week contract seemed prac- 
tically a lifetime deal to Johnny in those 
days, so he moved his family to the Coast 
without trepidation. But the job (and the 
show) folded after five weeks, and there 
they were: their small supply of cash going 
out for restaurant meals and crowded 
rooms in second-rate hotels. Johnny went 
u, out every day "buckin' " for jobs; Lor- 
raine stayed at home, washing the chil- 
dren's clothes in the bathtub, reading 
stories by the hour so that the healthy and 



active small fry would not annoy their less 
child-loving neighbors. 

Johnny got a break, an engagement in 
the Mapes Hotel in Reno. 

"I've gotta take it," he told Lorraine. 

"We'll all go," she replied firmly. 

But this was a quick deal — he had to be 
in Reno for rehearsal at two o'clock the 
next afternoon. Their all going made too 
many problems . . . train reservations, hotel 
reservations . . . and what would they do 
with Taffy? (Taffy had been Johnny's 
wedding gift to his bride — to keep her 
from being lonesome when he was away 
at sea.) 

"We'll buy a trailer," Lorraine said — it 
was a flash inspiration — then they all could 
go, Taffy, too. 

The down payment on the "beat-up 
twenty-two-footer" made a big crimp in 
his remaining cash, but he parted with it. 

Pleased as punch by now with his pur- 
chase — including a tank of butane gas for 
the three-burner stove, the accessory tank 
of water for cooking (and everything 
else) — he picked up Lorraine, who was 
waiting with all baggage, "animate and in- 
animate," set to go. 

"But there are no dishes," Lorraine 
wailed after inspecting her new domain. 
"And no table and no chairs." 

Back downtown they went, the whole 
crew of them this time, to the trailer sup- 
ply store. When he had bought the es- 
sentials, Johnny had less than thirty 
dollars left. 

It was sundown, and it was raining "like 
a son of a gun" when they headed out of 
the city, north by northeast. 

Everything went fine at the start. Sup- 
per was cold — cold cuts and fruit — but they 
had a thermos of cofEee. By eleven that 
night, Johnny had begun to get the feel 
of his new toy and was singing at the 
wheel — for fun, and for free — like an Irish 
lark. 

They were hitting a steep downgrade 
"on the loneliest road you ever saw," the 
rain still coming down in sheets, when . . 
bam! ... a trailer tire blew. By the time 
Johnny could brake his cumbersome rig 
on the wet, almost perpendicular road, the 
rim was split. 

There was nothing for it but to find a 
garage — that meant unhitching the crip- 
pled trailer, which Johnny did, muttering 
as the rain soaked him through. 

And the garage had no trailer rims, so 
they welded the broken one. This took a 
couple of hours. 

Nothing else happened until daybreak. 
They were going wp this time, the sign- 
posts reading: "Elevation 7000 feet." They 
were only halfway up Donner Pass, but 
already it was snowing, and bitterly cold. 
But they would still make it in time for 
Johnny's rehearsal — of course he would be 
wearing a beard and showing dark circles 
from lack of sleep, but they would make 
it. And then . bam! . . . the same tire. 
By the time Johnny slowed to a stop, the 
poor sad thing was cut to ribbons. 

The nearest garage was closed, but 
smoke was pouring out a chimney so 
Johnny banged on the door until he roused 
the proprietor. 

The fellow had no six-ply tires (mini- 
mum for trailer safety) but he thought a 
four-ply might get them there. But Johnny 
would have to put it on himself. 

Trailer jacks weigh at least several 
tons, Johnny decided wearily after his 
struggle with the massive thing. But the 
new tire was on, and Lorraine was offer- 
ing breakfast (hot cofEee still holding out) 
and their destination was — well, practical- 
ly — in sight. 
First he must pay for the tire. 



That, said the friendly fellow, would 
be thirty bucks. And, oh, another twelve 
for the tube. 

Johnny didn't have it, so the man ac- 
cepted his hundred-dollar gold watch. 

"Still has it, I guess," Johnny says cheer- 
fully now. "We've been all over hell-and- 
gone in that trailer, but somehow I never 
went back over that road." 

They hit Reno at 4:30 P.M., and headed 
for the first trailer park. It was a beauty, 
everything trim and freshly painted in- 
cluding a sign which read, "No Dogs." 

Way on the outskirts of town, they found 
a canine-loving park, "people-loving, too, 
I guess," Johnny says: "the guy took one 
look at me and offered to back her in. 

"It was cold as a mother-in-law's heart, 
five below zero, as a matter of fact, and 
the kids were turning blue. The fuel- 
frozen, too — wouldn't come in from the 
butane stove . . ." Johnny shudders even 
now, remembering. 

Johnny raced to the Mapes, took his 
"chastising," rehearsed, grabbed a quick 
shave at the hotel barber shop and went 
on. And, believe it or not, he says: "I did 
great." 

He stayed at the Mapes for a good long 
run — and has gone back regularly every 
year since, at a gradually increasing sal- 
ary. It's his good -luck spot, he figures. 
From there they headed south to Las 
Vegas — with everything working in the 
trailer and everybody happy — and back to 
the Coast to Del Mar, and back "home" to 
Hollywood where, although he didn't know 
it then, TV was waiting for Johnny. 

"Try for a TV one-shot," his agent ad- 
vised him, "so I can show you to some 
managers." 

Johnny tried for and got a spot, singing 
"A Little Bit of Heaven" on a variety 
show. Lights, Action, Camera — and was 
seen, presumably, by managers, and defi- 
nitely, by an NBC executive producer, Ed 
Sobol, who was impressed. 

"Where'd you come from, kid?" he asked 
Johnny after the show. "You'll be great 
for television with that voice and that 
Irish kisser. Contact me tomorrow." 

feobol set up a local show, On The Beat, 
in which Johnny played an Irish cop and 
sang dreamy, Irish-flavored duets with 
Carole Richards. When a top Coast-to- 
Coaster went off for the summer, Sobol 
steered Johnny into the spot as a replace- 
ment with his first big time try. The 
Johnny Dugan Show. 

"We put it together in about two weeks 
with old bits and spit," Johaiiy confessed. 
And, before the summer was over, the 
show had doubled the rating of its high- 
priced predecessor. Thus: Ladies' Choice. 

Johnny is a natural for this weekly tete- 
a-tete with the ladies, for he genuinely 
loves all ladies. He adored his mother, who 
died when he was sixteen. He greatly ad- 
mired his grandmother, thus the "Grand- 
mother of the Day" honor he has worked 
into his show. 

Unlike some emcees of daytime shows 
directed toward the women's audience, 
Johnny would take off an arm before he 
would get his laughs at his ladies' expense. 

"Women make up 98% of the listening 
audiences," he will tell you. "They buy all 
the products I know. . . . Lorraine 

buys all the soap we use at our house, and 
we use plenty — she's that fastidious. I 
don't see any profit in making the women 
look ridiculous." 

He wouldn't anyway. 

He likes the women too much. 

Some people would say that's natural. 
He's been pretty lucky in his choice of 
'em. 




// 



I 



Miss Chandler Roosevelt. Her complexion care is 
a thorough creaming with Pond's every night. "I 
just love the fresh, really clean look Pond's Cold 
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makes you 



I. 



so happy 
about your skin— 
this quick, easy 
v^onderful care!^^ 



says 

Miss Chandler Roosevelt 



Granddaughter of the late President 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and one 
of the most popular sophomores at 
hercollege. Miss Roosevelt is a sunny- 
gold blonde, with deep blue eyes. Her 
complexion is enviably lovely — clear 
and smooth, with a fresh, vital color. 



Many a girl gets the idea that a 
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Skin doctors know this isn't so. 

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And, a daily Pond's Cold Cream- 
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Circle on fresh finger- 
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For a bewildered teenager, love comes before understanding 



By 

ROSEMARY 

ROBERTS 



I HATE lying to people. Besides, I'm so bad at it that it doesn't even pay 
me to try. But, as I stood at my window watching Lefty Higgins stride 
back to his taxi, I bit my lips and decided that this time I'd had to lie. 
With Lefty's anxious brown eyes fixed on me that way, making plain the 
question he'd come all the way from New York to ask, I'd had to say it. 
"Of course, Jessie will be glad to see you, Lefty. Surprised, maybe, but so 
am I, having you and Blondie just drop down out of nowhere. When she 
gets over the first shock, she'll be glad as anything." 

All the time, in my mind, was the clear memory of thirteen-year-old 
Jessie's violent reaction to Lefty's last letter. I hate him. I hate him. He's 
not my father. Tell him. never to come to Springdale to see me, ever. 
Make him leave me alone! 

With a sigh I turned, and immediately my spirits rose. At least he'd 
brought Blondie along. Hating small towns the way she did, and antagonistic 
toward Jessie, Lefty's wife, Audrey, would have undoubtedly made things 
even worse, but my friend Blondie Van George was the best person I 
could think of to have around in an emergency. She didn't know much 
about kids, but she knew how to keep her head, whatever came up. 

"And when Jessie finds out Lefty's in town," I said, thinking aloud, 
"plenty's going to come up, unless I miss my guess." 

Blondie crossed her long, slim legs and regarded me ironically. "I 
thought that welcome mat was a little loud and hearty. You tell me the 
truth, Rosemary. If you don't want Lefty Higgins around, I'll sweep him 
and his cab back to New York so fast — " 

"It's not that I don't want him. I love Lefty! I don't want him and Jessie 
to hurt each other, that's all." I passed Blondie some cookies in absent- 
minded hospitality. "Still, it's got to be settled sooner or later. He is her 
father." 

Blondie brushed cookie crumbs from her lap. "Well, what's the matter 
with the kid? What's she got so awful against Lefty? He's so good, Rose- 
mary! If you knew how he's always thinking of her, thinking of things to 
send her. That's one thing gets on Audrey's nerves, you know. He never 
gets a word of thanks from Jessie." 

A word of thanks! I could still see Jessie's flushed, tear-streaked face 
bent over the last thing he'd sent her, the red silk di'ess. "I don't want it! 
He gave me away, now let him leave me alone!" {Continued on page 90) 



Roseniaiy is heard on CBS Radio, 11:45 A.M. EDT. for Ivory Snow. As pictured at the 
rijiht, Larry Haines plays Lefty, .loan Lazer is Jessie, and Virginia Kaye is Rosemary. 



74 




Lef+y didn't realize that Jessie, his own daughter, was ashamed of him. What could I do to help them both? 



75 



Stella Dallas, Exciting Lady 



(Continued from page 51) 

"I really put the 'torn' in tomboy," Anne 
says, with a grin, "and yet I've always 
loved feminine things, too. Love lacy negli- 
gees, volimiinous skirts, smart suits and 
dresses, my floral hats. I don't think a 
w^oman can have too much pride in her 
appearance. Even now, I run and put the 
lipstick on before Jack gets home! 

"Living life outdoors is, as I've said, a 
passion with me. One of my two passions. 
The other is the theatre. And the two have 
run, as you shall see, like parallel threads 
through my life, all of my life. And still do. 

"Born in Lake Charles, Louisiana — too 
many years ago!" Anne makes a comical 
face. "I was the youngest of eight, four 
boys, four girls. Of the eight, only three 
survive — my sisters, Markoleta and Fran- 
ces, and I. 

"Yet my parents — my wonderful, gal- 
lant-spirited parents — never let their sor- 
row make any difference to my sisters 
and me or to the rich and happy life they 
gave us . . . except that they expected us 
to do all the things both boys and girls do 
and, since we inherited our love of sports 
and back-to-nature from our father, we 
did all the things boys do — and I, at least, 
still do them! 

"Our home in Lake Charles was an old 
Southern mansion with galleries on three 
sides of the house. As a toddler, one of my 
favorite sports was to mount the railing 
of the top gallery where, precariously 
balanced, I'd nonchalantly devour sugar 
cane or licorice, which were to me what 
lollipops and ice cream are to other kids. 
There are people in Lake Charles who 
still remember me, a speed-demon on 
roller skates, streaking by with a licorice 
stick in my mouth! 

"At the same time, however, as I was 
skating, swimming, playing baseball, I was 
also 'acting,' for I always, from the age of 
two and a half, said that I was going to 
be an actress. When people laughed at my 
'notion,' I'd get so mad! How could they 
laugh at something that was so definite in 
my mind? My parents didn't laugh. They 
may have hoped — and I later realized they 
did hope — I would get over my 'bug,' but 
they never laughed at me. They took me 
to see my first play when I was three. For 
the plays I put on at home. Mother let me 
'dress up' in her beautiful gowns and — 
this was my favorite costume — her wed- 
ding negligee with its train and elaborate 
petticoat. Later, when I was a teenager 
and going to high school in Chicago, they 
took me to see the important actresses of 
the day — among they, Maude Adams, Lil- 
lian Russell, Minnie Maddern Fiske. . . . 

"We had a big yard around the Lake 
Charles house which became, every after- 
noon — according to the season — a football 
field, a baseball diamond, an arena for 
snowball fights. Snowballs in Louisiana 
were achieved, thanks to the fact that we 
had an ice box, the biggest I've ever seen 
— it held 500 pounds. I'd go in, get the ice- 
shaver, and by the hour shave ice to make 
the snowballs for the gang. But often, too, 
while a battle was in progress, I'd have a 
bunch of kids off in a corner, acting! 

"In our spacious dining room, beauti- 
fully panelled in curly cypress, there 
was, at the far end, a wide window seat 
latticed at either side. This was my first 
stage, upon which, at the end of every 
meal, I would mount and perform. How 
they stood me, I don't know! Imitations 
were my specialty. I always imitated 
Mother's callers. And the village 'charac- 
ters.' But although I imitated people with 
*' gusto — and, I'm told, fidelity — I never made 
fun of them. 

"When I was seven. Daddy picked up 
76 



and left Lake Charles. We lived, there- 
after, in many parts of the country — in 
Texas, in Arkansas, in Chicago^ — but we 
moved, from Lake Charles, to a ranch 
near Denver, Colorado, where I attended 
grade school. I used to ride my pony to 
school and rode so fast that, when I pulled 
into the yard, nothing but crumbs would 
be left in my lunch-box! 

"In Colorado, too, the theatre — as well 
as the outdoors — was, so to speak, with me. 
Paul Whiteman lived within two miles of 
us. (Paul now lives within one mile of us 
here in New Jersey!) And in Denver, there 
were the famed Elitch's Gardens, where 
we saw all of the best New York actors 
who played there during the summers. 

"Later, during high school days in Chi- 
cago, I, always interested in athletics, 
made quite a record for myself in the field 
meets. I did the high jump, the broad 
jump, the running jump. In the races, my 
specialty was the one-hundred-yard, also 
the fifty-yard dash. During one meet, folk- 
dancing was introduced between the races, 
and I was obliged to do the 50-yard dash 
in an accordion-pleated skirt. They gave 
another girl first place because it was my 
skirt, and not me, they said, that came 
over the line first! 

"Although my parents had always said 
I could go on the stage, I must first, they 
made clear, have an education. 'All ac- 
tresses,' said my mother, 'go to convents.' 
Accordingly, I was sent to Mt. de Chantal 
Convent — from which my mother gradu- 
ated — in Wheeling, West Virginia. Here, 
too, the pattern, my pattern of the parallel 
threads, continued. I did all the sports. I 
did the school plays. I imitated all the 
teachers (even, by request, some of the 
nuns) . And the girls would ask me to 
imitate them 'so we can see how we look.' 

"One time, we gave 'Joan of Arc,' in 
which I played the Dauphin. But the re- 
viewer got a bit mixed up between his 
princes and fishes — and reported, 'Anne 
Elstner played the dolphin.' As I wrote 
my mother, when I sent her the clipping, 
'I must have gotten along swimmingly!' 

"It might sound, from all this," Anne 
remarks parenthetically, "as though I were 
much more interested in play-acting than 
school-going. Actually, I have always been 
keenly interested in education, and still 
am. I believe in competition and incentive. 
Each year, I give a dictionary for the best 
speller in our local school — and, every 
Christmas during the war, gave each child 
a book with one stamp in it to start a War 
Bond. 

"It was only a ten-cent stamp, but I re- 
member one little fellow from the kinder- 
garten who gravely greeted me. 'Hello, 
Mrs. Dallas. Thank you for the War Bond!' 
But these things, of course," Anne smiles, 
"came later, much later. So — back to the 
days before I was ever known as Stella 
Dallas. . . . 

"It had been agreed by my parents that, 
after I graduated, I could go to New York 
and make my bid for the theatre. But, 
before that, I was to take a summer trip 
with my mother, then go home and pack 
up for the Great White Way. That was 
when my sister Markoleta wrote me: 
'Hurry home. I've got a beau picked out 
for you. Meanwhile, I'm dating him!' 

"Home, at this time, was San Benito, 
Texas — and, the first night I arrived, I put 
on an evening dress and went to a dance 
with the beau my sister had picked out. 

"He was John Matthews, Jr. And I fell 
head over heels in love with him on sight. 
The minute I walked into the room, there 
was no question about that. I liked his 
manner. I liked his looks. I liked his Army 
uniform and the fact that he was born in 



La Plata, Maryland, which made him seerr 
'home folks.' When I later discovered h( 
could ride better than just anybody- 
could gallop and shoot at and hit tele 
phone poles as he went by — oh, boy! I likec 
everything about him. He started datinj 
me, yes, but he dated others, too, and s( 
did I. But I was always thrilled when '. 
was with him and always, when witl 
other boys, missed him more than ever 
• "Then he left San Benito — 'Destinatior 
Unknown' — and, soon after, I was on m; 
way to New York." 

In New York, Anne went first to Sar- 
gent's Dramatic School "to get my fee 
pointed in the right direction." There 
after, she hit the trail so many girls hac 
blazed before, and will blaze after her 
She made the roiuids, the forever fruitlesi 
rounds, it seemed, of casting offices anc 
agencies. She lived in rented rooms anc 
cheap boarding-houses. "Terrible places.' 
Her first break was "Liliom," in which shi 
understudied Eva Le Gallienne and actual- 
ly played her part. Later, she created th( 
role of Emmy in "Sun-Up" on Broadway 
But quite a spell later. Meantime, she tool 
jobs of all kinds: "I sold things. Holeproo 
hosiery, for instance. I past^ silhouettei 
in an art studio. I worked as secretary fc; 
a very wealthy man, a promoter on Wal 
Street who, when I told him 'I csin't taki 
shorthand,' said, 'You've got the personal 
ity I want.' He read poetry to me. And wa; 
a perfect gentleman. But I had to do busi- 
ness with the biggest banks and, whei 
he was in South America where his inter- 
ests were, he'd send cables and I'd decodt 
them! I had to do more acting on tha 
job," Anne laughs, "than I've ever had t» 
do since!" 

When Anne's luck turned, it turned, a: 
luck has a way of doing, all the way! Shi 
landed the job in "Sun-Up." "Mrs. Brough 
an old friend of my mother's, looked m» 
up and insisted that I 'come home' anc 
share her wonderful big apartment witl 
her and her daughter Bessie, a girl of mj 
own age. And I had a card from Markoleti 
telling me: 'Jack Matthews is in Nev 
York. He's with the F.B.I. Doing shadow- 
ing and things.' (At one time he shadowec 
Nicky Arnstein — that was something!) 

"Thereafter, I kept thinking — and Bes 
sie, in whom I had confided the state oi 
my heart, kept sighing: 'Oh, when will hi 
come? When will we see him?' 

"One day, on our way to a musical a 
the Three Arts Club, which I had jusi 
joined three days before, I stopped in thi 
traffic on Broadway at Seventy-nintl 
Street to say, 'I just feel like I'm going ti 
run into Jack Matthews! Yes, today. Now 

"After the musicale, as we started ti 
leave, Bessie saw me pushing aside chair! 
as I yelled, 'There is Jack Matthews!' 

"So we walked him home to dinnei) 
And, after that, I saw him all the tim^ 
although we weren't engaged. He ha^ 
other dates and I had lots of beaux. 

"I don't believe, I can't remember, 
Anne soimds amused, "that Jack evei 
rightly proposed to me. Not in so man^ 
words. Once I was telling him about th' 
fellow I'd gone dancing with the night be 
fore. 'His name,' I said, 'is Henry.' 'Well 
listen, I don't want you to be Henry's gir] 
or Johnny's girl! I want you,' he said, 't< 
be mine.' This, to the best of my recollec; 
tion, was his proposal. 

"Some months after our meeting in Ne ■ 
York, Jack went back home to Maryland 
with his father, to a 500-acre tobacc. 
plantation which had been in the famil 
for more than a century. The house, two 
hundred-and-ten years old, had been pai( 
for in bags of gold, so the legend runs, b' 
a sea captain. 



"Meanwhile, I'd landed 'Sun-Up' and 
Tiade quite a success in it. Every time 
lack saw it, and he saw it several times, 
le'd come backstage mad as a hornet at 
;he love scenesi "What's a woman doing,' 
le'd growl, 'with a damn career?' 

"When, after the New York run, we 
were set to go to London with the show, 
t wrote Jack: "They want me to go to 
London.' "Well, if you want to put the 
Dcean between us,' he wrote back, 'I w^ant 
you to do what you want to do, but I 
wouldn't do it." 

"I couldn't, either. 

"We got married, very quietly, at the 
Little Church around the Corner, and I 
went 'back to the farm.' But it was, in 
keeping with my pattern, just like in a 
theatre. The house, known as The Ferry, is 
one of the places where Washington ac- 
tually slept because it had been, in his 
time, the ferry across the Potomac. We 
had no lights, no heat, no furniture, no 
radio (a friend gave us one which had no 
batteries — we hitched it up, every night, 
to the Model-T Ford). No money (Jack 
traded his eggs for coffee, butter, sugar, 
etc.), but we lived like lords. Diamond- 
back terrapin eind canvasback ducks for 
dinner. And oysters which were tonged 
five minutes before eating. And beef hung 
2ind aged on the place. After living in the 
Quick-and-Dirties, to eat terrapin and 
beef with the man you love . . . ! There 
was a mile of river front and a canoe on 
the river and we'd go, by canoe, by moon- 
light to the neighborhood dances. It was 
romance and enchantment, it was magical 
and fabulous; a fabled life and, if anyone 
from New York called me. Jack, feeling 
he'd got me out of the theatre, would say: 
'It's that career reaching out for you!' 

" 'A farm,' he said, 'is where we belong.' 

"So it was. So, blessedly, it is. But — 
although, our last year in Maryland, we 



raised 19,000 pounds of tobacco, 2000 bush- 
els of wheat and 200 barrels of corn — we 
couldn't make enough money to live. And 
it was back to New York — 'The Devil's 
Lap,' Jack called it — for us. The day we 
left the plantation, we sat and cried. The 
family who lived and worked on the place 
with us sat and cried, too. 

"Soon after we got back to New York, 
I saw in the paper an item about a revival 
of 'Sun-Up.' I went down, naturally inter- 
ested, to the theatre; Lulu Vollmer, who 
wrote the play, was there. 'Anne,' she 
said, 'you are an answer to a prayer!' 

" 'Miss Elstner,' called the stage direc- 
tor, 'will you come up, please?' 

"I went up, picked up the lines, and 
when Jack stopped by for me that after- 
noon, "First thing I heard,' he tells you, 
laughing, 'was Anne's voice on-stage and 
I thought. They got her again!' 

"It was after the revival, which ran a 
short time, that Lulu "Vollmer wrote 
Moonshine And Honeysuckle, the first 
thing written for radio by a 'name' writer. 
It was a Sunday-afternoon show, ran for 
three years, and I played Cracker Gaddis, 
the lead and, in addition, six other parts 
— including that of the old, crazy mother. 
At the end of three years' time, a play was 
made of 'Moonshine,' and I went on the 
road with it. 

"My experience on the road with 
'Moonshine' made me realize that in one 
radio broadcast you play to more people 
than in a lifetime in the theatre. I realized 
that on radio you are in people's homes 
every day — in their homes and their hearts. 
I saw, as we met people face to face, how 
they adored the characters. 'Firecracker,' 
they called me, 'Cracker' for short! As, 
when we first moved to Jersey, much of 
my mail — bills included — came addressed 
to 'Stella Dallas.' And in the village, peo- 
ple came up to tell me their troubles; 



ask 'Stella's' help with their problems. You 
get no more out of this life, so I believe, 
than you put into it, and I do resent not 
having time to do more for others than I 
do. But in this department I feel that 
'Stella' — who does so much for others — 
helps me, by proxy, to do the same. 

"So I knew, when I met my radio public 
face-to-face, where I belonged. And know 
it now. 

"When I came back from the tour, I 
went into radio with a will. Often I worked 
nineteen hours a day, did seven shows a 
day — the lead in Miss Lilla, in Showboat, 
on the Heinz Magazine Of The Air — 
Moonshine And Honeysuckle, Hearthrobs 
Of The Hills, March Of Time— nearly 
7,000 shows in all is my total, so I figure, 
to date. 

"But meantime we were living, pent-up, 
in the shadow of the studios, and you may 
imagine how we felt. Our hunting aind our 
fishing . . . the wind in our faces, and the 
rain. . . . We had to get hack to nature. 

"Stella helped me. With Stella, a day- 
time show, I could live a saner life. Week- 
ends, we were able to go out and shoot 
and swim and hike and do the things we 
liked to do. And Jack, so glad not to have 
me in the theatre, was reconciled — and 
happily — to radio. Has even done a few 
shows himself — but mostly to help out a 
friend — but acted, I must admit, as if he 
were led to the slaughter! 

"And so, one day, we found — thanks to 
friends who live in our neighborhood — 
the old stone house. And here my two 
passions have met and run parallel again 
in, and through, my life. As Stella Dallas, 
my love of the theatre is well and richly 
satisfied. As Mrs. Jack Matthews, wife and 
boon companion of my huntin,' ridin,' 
shootin' husband, I am living my life out- 
doors where, for my happiness, it must be 
lived." 



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77 



Man about the House 



{Continued from page 55) 
to the country from a New York apartment 
a little more than a year ago," he says, 
"it was the first time in years that I got 
my hands really grimy, and it felt good. 
Good, because it brought back my child- 
hood in Iowa. Memories of my father's 
farm, of my hard-working, strong, won- 
derful grandfather, and the stories they 
told me about my great-grandfather. How 
he had come from Europe and made his 
way out to Iowa with only his blacksmith 
tools to get him started in a new world. 
Living once more in a country com- 
munity, I, too, began to remember many 
skills I had been taught but had almost 
forgotten over the years. Now I am de- 
Hghted to be passing them on to my own 
two sons." 

These skills include finishing the stone 
masonry on the outside of his modern 
house, woodworking in his workshop, lay- 
ing flagstone for the terrace, and digging 
out huge boulders which clutter up space 
wanted for gardens. Karl's also building an 
outdoor grill, patterned after one he saw 
in an old Danish kitchen on a trip to the 
Virgin Islands. 

The family consists of Karl and Mar- 
jorie, the blue-eyed blonde he met and 
fell in love with during their college days; 
their thirteen-year-old daughter Lynn, a 
Girl Scout, butterfly-collector, lover of 
horses and country-enthusiast in general; 
Christopher, nine, a Cub Scout, who shares 
his dad's passion for woodworking and 
making things; and Mark, who at three is 
enamoured of their small garden tractor. 

IVlarj and Karl were country kids orig- 
inally. They met at Cornell College in Mt. 
Vernon, Iowa, the town where Marj lived 
with her folks. She was majoring in Eng- 
lish and was editor of the college paper. 
Karl was minoring in English. Both were 
contributors to the college literary maga- 
zine and members of its literary society, so 
there was a definite association of interests 
from the first. When Marj transferred to 
the University of Iowa to work for a 
Master's degree, Karl transferred, too. 
Already he had decided, however, that he 
was going to be an actor, encouraged by 
the fact that the head of the speech de- 
partment had recommended him for a job 
with the Old Globe stock company, a 
Shakespearean repertory company. 

After college, Marj had gone abroad as 
research assistant to a professor of history 
who was digging into British museum rec- 
ords, after which she stayed in New York 
and took an advertising copy job. Karl 
had decided to try his luck in radio in 
Chicago, and for that purpose had bor- 
rowed fifty dollars to get him there and 
give it a try. 

"I was expecting to be with some friends 
and to look over the radio situation, then 
go on to New York for a visit with Marj 
before getting settled in Chicago. I had 
some auditions, was encouraged to stay on 
and wait, and then got a role in a half- 
hour dramatic radio show. The afternoon 
before the broadcast, the director re- 
marked, quite casually, that it was a 
'dress' show — and I was travelling . with 
one suitcase and no dress-up clothes at 
all. So, between rehearsal and broadcast, 
I hocked my typewriter and bought an 
inexpensive linen summer suit and white 
shoes. 

"It was great to be introduced to an 

„ audience as 'one of Chicago's new, young 

1^ leading men,' but it would have sounded 

sweeter if I had had time to get some 

dinner, instead of standing there feeling 

empty and dizzy. It was the beginning, 

/o 



however, of a run of jobs, and my trip to 
see Marj had to be put off time and time 
again. When I did fly to New York, about 
a year later, I was fairly well established 
in radio, had paid my debts, and owned a 
small farm back home, so I convinced 
Marj it was high time we stopped being 
'engaged' and got married. After all, I had 
seen her exactly two days out of that whole 
year. A few weeks later, we were married 
by Marj's minister-father in the town 
where we met, and we started our married 
life in Chicago." 

Months sped into years. Karl became 
successful. He was Kirk Harding in an 
important serial called The Woman In 
White, and he was in demand for many 
other dramas. One day, Karl was looking 
through his appointment book, thinking 
that it was a very good week, in which he 
was doing several important shows. It 
occurred to him that they were about the 
same shows he had done the year before, 
for about the same money. Out of curi- 
osity, he got out the previous year's book 
and verified that. "I'm in a rut," he said. 
He turned to Marj. "How would you 
like to go to New York to live?" he asked. 
"Fine," she said. "I like New York. It 
might be better for your work." 

And the decision was sealed, just that 
way, although they already had Lynn to 
consider and Marj was pregnant with her 
second child. 

Karl and Marj had no special plans for 
New York other than: one, finding a place 
to live; and two, finding some jobs for 
Karl. Karl was soon at work on one 
program after another. He even went into 
two Broadway plays, neither of which 
lasted long enough to make much differ- 
ence, but there was always radio to carry 
him along. 

Finding an apartment was a different 
story. There was one on Long Island, 
another in the heart of New York. And 
then Karl went into the Navy, assigned to 
the Armed Forces Radio Service. After 
his discharge, he went back to radio and 
another stage try, this time with an off- 
Broadway group called New Stages. 

As television developed, Karl's jobs de- 
veloped with it, and he was in early Studio 
One dramas, in City Hospital, and Lamp 
Unto My Feet. He still does a role, that of 
Pat the bartender, whenever that char- 
acter is included in the script of Search 
For Tomorrow. On radio, he plays regu- 
larly in Lorenzo Jones, intermittently in 
The Greatest Story Ever Told, appearing 
as the Apostle John, and, of course, he is 
heard in the Best Plays series, in Mr. Keen, 
Mr. Chameleon, and a dozen others. The 
blind know his voice because of his re- 
cordings of their Talking Books. 

That voice, capable of many variations 
and rich in quality, which had been his 
stock-in-trade during all the years of 
radio and stage, failed Karl temporarily 
about four years ago when he was dou- 
bling on both the stage and radio. Overuse 
••and forcing it had developed what is called 
a "singer's node" on the vocal cords. After 
an operation, Karl had to be completely 
silent for six weeks. Not even a whisper 
was allowed. 

He turned to manual work to relieve the 
strain of waiting. A friend who had 
bought an old Pennsylvania Dutch farm- 
house in Bucks County was re-doing it, 
and Karl began to get his hands used to 
being dirty again by pitching in and 
helping him. 

Their own house, modern and functional, 
made of cypress and stone, is situated near 
a lovely small lake. A bluff drops a hun- 
dred feet in front of the house, and the view 



across the valley is superb. The Webers 
fell in love with the site the first time they 
saw it, but found that not less than a 
fourteen-ac. - plot could be bought. This 
would have been biting off a great deal 
more than they could chew. Karl and a 
friend decided to go into it together, taking 
what each wanted for his own property— 
in Karl's case, about four acres — and sell- 
ing off the rest to seven others, stipulating 
that modern houses only must be erected 
and that plans must be approved. 

The Weber house is on three levels. "A 
labor-saving house," they describe it, with 
Marj's work area, the kitchen and dining 
portions, concentrated at the center of the 
house, not too far to run to answer door- 
bells, not too far from guests in the 
living room. The dinette is really a curved 
counter extended from the kitchen area, 
where the kids can be served quickly. 

Karl had a contractor for the house, 
then went over the list and checked off 
everything he could do himself. Such 
things as the inside and outside finishing, 
the stone masonry and cabinet work. All 
the landscaping and terracing. "We did 
the fireplace wall ourselves, a nineteen- 
foot stone wall, with a raised fireplace that 
takes four-foot logs." He shows you how 
the blue-gray stone complements the pink- 
ish cherry wood paneling. "There are 
about five tons of stone in that wall," he 
goes on. "I know, because I cut every bit 
of it from the rough stone and laid it in 
myself." 

The thirty -five -foot floor-to-ceiling win- 
dow — which overlooks the bluff and the 
valley, where the view is punctuated by a 
picture-book church steeple off in the 
distance — is being fitted to drapes by Marj 

There is a master bedroom with its own 
dressing room and bath, as well as two 
other rooms on that same floor, one to be 
a study and the other a guest room with 
bath. "The two older children have their 
own "apartment" on another level, over 
the garage and shop area — two bedrooms 
and bath and a large playroom. A sun- 
deck adjoins the children's quarters, en- 
joyed by the entire family. 

1 here is a huge vegetable garden, flower 
gardens, an orchard with fruit and nut 
trees, and the wooded slopes are covered 
in the spring with a mist of pink-and- 
white dogwood and tulip trees. There are 
lilacs in the spring, roses in June, and all 
the beautiful fall flowers almost until the 
snow falls. Karl has built a grape arboij 
and the little plants are taking hold beau^ 
tifully. All these things fascinate the city-, 
bred Weber children and are an endles^ 
source of wondering discussion. 

There was just a little doubt in every- 
body's mind when they first acquired th^ 
country property. Would Marj and KarlJ 
especially housewife Marj, miss the near-] 
ness of city friends? Would the children 
miss their old associations? As it has 
turned out, there are new friends galore, 
and the old ones just wait for invitations. 

"It has got so that we rate our guests 
now according to their skills," Karl will 
tell you, trying to hide his tongue-in- 
cheek look. " 'Do you paint?' we will ask 
a prospective guest. |Do you garden? Are 
you handy with tools?' Then Marj and I 
will decide what needs to be done that 
weekend and whether it is a good one for 
these particular guests!" J 

Actually, the Webers themselves hav^ 
done practically all the work, for which ' 
they haven't hired helpers. Especially 
Karl, who has never had so much fun 
since he was a boy, getting his hands 
really dirty. And liking them that way! 



A 





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Robert Q. Lewis 


4:15 


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Dan 




4:05 The Chicagoans 


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Young Widder Brown 


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4:00 

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Backstage Wife 

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81 



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Ev'ry Day 


Tell Your Neighbor 




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9:45 




• 




In Town Today 


10:00 


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10:15 




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with Robert Q. 


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i^:OU 




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Second Mrs. Burton 


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3:00 


Life Can Be Beautiful 


Cameo Talks 


Tennessee Ernie 


Hilltop House 


3:15 


Road Of Life 


3:05 John Gambling 


(Cont.) 


House Party 


3:30 


Pepper Young 




. 




3:45 


Right To Happiness 




3:55 Edward Arnold. 
Storyteller 


Wizard Of Odds 

3:55 It Happens 

Every Day 


4:00 


Backstage Wife 


Music By Bruce And 
Dan 


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Robert Q. Lewis 
4:05 The Chicagoant 


4:15 


Stella Dallas 




4:25 Betty Crocker 




4:30 


Young Widder Brown 


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Evening Programs 



6:0U 
6:15 
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Lionel Ricau 
Bill Stern 

Three Star Extra 


Local Program 




Jackson & The News 
Dwight Cooke 

Lowell Thomas 


7:00 
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Piatt erbrains 


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10:00 
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morrow 

rts."; Edwin c Hii 


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Cerlric Adams 



82 



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Give And Take 



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Coffee In Washing- 
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Ruby Mercer 


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At The Shamrock 
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Country Style Music 
News. Ed Morgan 



"We're All Pulling Together' 



(Continued from page 46) 
of this family, tool" he fairly shouted. 

"And that's how it is with us," ex- 
plained Barbara, the pretty blonde co- 
star of the Mr. And Mrs. North series. 
"This is a one- hundred percent family! 
Everybody pulls together. Good thing, too. 
Otherwise we'd never make it!" 

The Barbara Britton who plays the role 
of Pam North on the air appears as a gay, 
giddy, not always practical wife. The 
Barbara Britton who is Mrs. Eugene 
Czukor at home is gay. sometimes giddy — 
but always practical! The secret lies, she 
says, in the hitched- up-horsepower help 
of her family. 

"We're more than just a unit," she 
laughed, "we're a team! There's my hus- 
band. Gene, six-year-old Teddy, year- 
and -a -half-old Cris (Christopher Eu- 
genia), our houseboy, Kay — and, of course, 
me! When we're all in action, we're faster 
than the Brooklyn Dodgers on a double 
play!" 

Barbara fits into this smooth-running 
combination like the spark plug in an 
engine. In fact, the analogy can be carried 
further: Gene is the driving power and 
has the energy of eight pistons; Teddy is 
the spark that keeps them jumping with 
his humor; eighteen-month-old Cris is 
the timer — since her risings and settings 
dictate the flow of movement in the house; 
and Kay, the houseboy, is the eccentric — 
because that's what he is! 

Although Barbara did most of the cook- 
ing, cleaning, and sewing in the little 
house, things changed when they leased 
and moved into Ilona Massey's big house 
in the Valley. So Kay was brought in to 
help keep things in order. 



But Kay is a Japanese exchange student. 
So what happened? Everybody in the 
house helps with Kay's homework! But 
that's as it should be, since it only goes to 
show that everybody works as a team. 

"I was pleasantly surprised," said Bar- 
bai'a, "when Gene suggested we bring in 
an exchange student, since the idea had 
never occurred to me. I was pleased, too. 
Gene said we could do as much good for 
Kay as he could for us. 

"And we do. Gene helps Kay at night 
with his homework. They look like two 
college kids poring over Silas Marner! 
Last month, I went up to the attic and got 
out some of my old speech books which 
show how to hold your lips and tongue 
for good pronunciation. Then Kay and I 
stood in front of the big living-room mir- 
ror and a-e-i-o-u'd all evening. 

"We practiced every other night for 
weeks. Then one morning last week, I was 
hanging some wash out on the line in the 
back yard when I heard one of the neigh- 
bor children say to his playmate, 'Look — 
there's the A-e-i-o-u Lady!' 

"'Well!' was all I could say. 

"I learned," said Barbara, "that their TV 
was set against a window that looked into 
our living-room mirror. When Kay and I 
were practicing his English, they could 
look into our reflection — and doubtless our 
a-e-i-o-u's hummed in their ears. 

'T suppose it was upsetting — especially 
if it came as a background to a show like 
Mr. And Mrs. North! Imagine dialogue 
like 'Have you a-e-i-o-w . . . got the 
a-e-i-o-ii . . . gun, Pam?' Or 'Where's the 
a-e-i-o-u . . . poison, Jerry?' 

"You can bet," said Barbara, '"the 
A-e-i-o-u Lady, and Kay changed their 



a-e-i-o-u practicing room in a hurry." 

Kay thinks he is getting more help from 
Barbara and Gene than they are from 
him. Gene found him. a part-time job on 
his Easter vacation and then financed his 
first suit with matching trousers! "Match- 
ing trousers," said Kay. "Ah, so, I did not 
have some in Japan. . . ." 

"But I think we come out more than 
even in the exchange," said Barbara. "If 
anyone gets the advantage, it's me — since 
Kay has shown me a way to get the chil- 
dren interested in eating vegetables. You'll 
have to admit that as a hard job, that 
compares with the digging of the Panama 
Canal." 

Kay does it by making clay models of 
the vegetables with the children. Every 
afternoon about three o'clock, Teddy be- 
gins pestering Barbara with, "Mommy, 
Mommy, is Kay home yet?" He can hardly 
wait for Kay to get in from North Holly- 
wood High School and start the vegetable 
modeling. 

"Yesterday, as usual," said Barbara, 
"when Kay came in he went out in the 
back yard with Teddy and began making 
clay models — mostly of animals and the 
vegetables. That's fine for Teddy, since he 
can learn about so many different kinds 
of things. Kay, in turn, gets practice at the 
English names for the things they make. 

"Sometimes they get mixed up and their 
clay models make for comedy. For ex- 
ample, last night we had Brussels sprouts 
for dinner. When Teddy sat down, he 
recognized the sprouts as Kay's small 
clay models of cabbages. 'Oh, boy,' he 
said, eager to show off his newly gained 
knowledge, 'Oh, boy, do I like cahhages!' 

"Then Kay, who has trouble with his 



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83 



'L's,' entered the dining room and said, 
'Oh, no, Teddy, no cabbages — these 
brushes sprout!' 

"Well, if you'll pardon the expression, 
that was the craziest! But it is a good way 
to get up children's interest in eating the 
things that are good for them. 

"The vegetable eating is one problem 
we've licked through co-operation. An- 
other is the problem of the ivy — also a 
vegetable, as Teddy pointed out." 

When Barbara and the family first 
moved into Ilona Massey's Valley home, it 
was covered with ivy. Everything grows 
in the Valley and, with plentiful water, 
grows like Jack's beanstalk. Barbara's 
property has a stream running right 
through it, so the ivy completely covered 
the house. It looked like a green-and- 
yellow variegated mountain from the 
rear. 

"I remember noticing once," said Bar- 
bara, "without paying it too much atten- 
tion, that the ivy was creeping in the bed- 
room window. My reaction to this was 
'How quaint!' " 

One morning a few weeks later, Barbara 
awoke and the first thing she saw was 
the long arm of the ivy reaching out from 
the window, across the wall and, with 
greedy green-and-yellow fingers, down 
toward the bed! 

"I was shocked," said Barbara, "and a 
little bit frightened, too. It was so human 
it gave me the creeps. It had grown so 
fast — almost overnight! Of course, I was 
ashamed of my fright. After all, it was 
only ivy, and this made it seem so funny. 
So I didn't say anything to Gene. 



"Two days later, I was lolling in a warm 
tub when I dropped my hand over the 
side. What was this! Thick, stubby fingers 
of ivy! In a tub this can be most dis- 
concerting. . . . 

"After my bath, I went into Cris' nursery 
to check on her nap. There was the ivy, 
like Peck's bad boy, peeking from under 
the dresser, reaching toward the crib. This 
was too much! 

"It could scare me in bed and in the 
tub — but when it threatened my child, it 
would have to go, decorative or not!" 

Like a general marshalling his troops 
before a great battle, Barbara called a 
meeting of war. It was to be the Czukors 
vs. the Ivy. 

"Listen to me," she said, when they were 
all gathered around the council table (the 
breakfast nook). "The ivy's growing out 
of hand. It's invaded nearly every room 
in the house, and if we don't take a stand 
soon, we won't have a beachhead. What 
do you say? It's got to be us or the ivy!" 

"Hear! Hear!" said Dr. Czukor. 

"Ah, so . . ." said Kay. 

"Da . . ." contributed Cris. 

"But isn't ivy a vegetable. Mom?" said 
Teddy. 

Well! thought Barbara. Attack from an 
unexpected quarter. She was -momentarily 
shocked into silence. Then, quickly re- 
covering her balance like a prizefighter, 
she countered with, "Yes, ivy is a vege- 
table, Teddy. But, like all things, there 
are good vegetables and bad vegetables. 
Now ivy is threatening our home — and the 
back yard where you make clay models. 



Do you think it's a bad vegetable ft 
doing that?" 

Said Teddy with determination, "Yes 

"Then," said Dr. Czukor, "that settles it 
and he started passing out the saws ar 
knives with which to do battle. 

The ivy put up a good fight but, after tw 
days of constant hacking, snipping, an 
chopping, it was fairly well cleared froi 
the bedroom, bathroom, aind nursery. 

Said Dr. Czukor: "After cutting away ; 
it for two whole days, working clockwis 
around the house, I almost expected 
come around the final corner and find tbUos 
part I'd cut out two days ago grown bac 
in again, stronger than ever. But it hadn 
— thanks to Teddy. He got into the sma 
nooks and crannies where Kay and 
couldn't penetrate. Teddy was a regula 
little commando." 

"Of course, it isn't all gone," said Bar 
bara. "We left enough for shade in th 
back, and I even cut some to fill th 
antique vases for decorating in the livin 
room. But, believe me, I keep my eye o 
the stuff that's in the house! You ca 
never tell — it may devour the vase! 

"And so," said Barbara, "whether it's th[ 
ivy, Kay's 'brushes sprout,' or some othe 
problem facing us, we feel our co-opera 
tive efforts will help us tackle it. Perhap 
it is the spirit of the thing that helps us- 
we have confidence in our ability when w 
know that everyone is pulling togethei 
This co-operative spirit is both the hi 
octane fuel and the lubricating oil tha 
keeps the 160-horsepower engine that i 
this family humming along so smoothlj 
Or, as Kay says, 'Humming so, ah, so . . .'! 



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(Continued from page 69) 

Spring remembers the time, in the last 
year of the war, when she received a 
letter from her daughter Phyllis. "Find 
a house. Mother," it said, "because Bill, 
Lois Ann, and I will be out in two weeks." 

It was indeed a time for orderly think- 
• ing. 

"Fifteen days to find a decent place 
for the four of us to live! After spending 
most of my life in hotels, I knew very 
little about houses. And, this being the 
time of true scarcity, there was very little 
to be found, even if you knew about 
houses." 

This would have been a fine time for 
Spring to panic, to buy the first thing she 
laid her eyes on. But, instead, she stuck 
to her ideas of logic and order — even as 
the days swept by. Spring knew that a 
hasty decision wouldn't help her out of 
her difficulties. The house had to be 
right for herself, right for the family, or 
they would all be miserable and what good 
would just having a house do any of 
them? So, holding her breath a little 
more every day. Spring searched patiently 
for the one house that would be right for 
their needs. 

"I finally came across this house," 
Spring explains. "Though there was no 
furniture in it, I saw that it had possi- 
bilities for living. There was plenty of 
room both upstairs and down, and that 
allowed for privacy — something two fami- 
lies must have if they're to live together." 

Getting the house solved the imme- 
diate needs of Spring, her children and 
her grandchildren. But, there were still 
other experiences to be encountered. 

"I knew right away that I was going to 
have to make a new kind of life," Spring 
says seriously. "I had been living alone 
*' for so long, traveling on the road in the 
theatre, working in motion pictures in 
Hollywood, that I had grown very set 
84 



My Secret of Happiness 

in my ways. So I knew that living with 
the children, much as I would enjoy it 
and had looked forward to it, would be 
a challenge. Not a problem, mind you," 
she adds with a twinkle in her bright 
blue eyes, "but a challenge. 

"As a matter of fact, I don't call things 
'problems.' I call them 'projects.' In 
thinking seriously about daily upsets, I've 
found I could replace the word 'problem' 
with 'project' and, as soon as I did, the 
whole thing changed color like a cham- 
eleon in the sun. 

"Suddenly, a dark problem, like a 
vicious whirlpool without a bottom, when 
turned into a project, takes on shape and 
form. Once I've figured out the shape 
and form, with patience and a little 
orderly thinking, I find I can take my 
projects one by one and work them out 
one step at a time. Discipline and order 
in your thinking work wonders in saving 
you from the confusion of flying off in 
every direction in an attempt to overcome 
difficulty." 

Spring realized, when she moved into 
the new house with her daughter Phyllis, 
son-in-law Bill Baxley and little Lois 
Ann (nicknamed S'An), that they would 
need furniture. "I merely dialed the 
furniture store and asked, 'What can 
you deliver on Thursday?' Then, furni- 
ture and family arrived together the next 
day, and we trooped into the house, safari 
fashion. 

"The house and furniture were small 
projects," Spring says. "People are really 
big projects. You can replace all things 
but you can't replace the affection and 
contributions which people make to your 
life. 

"Since we had all more or less lived 
on our own, we wanted to continue that 
way. Young-marrieds need time to- 
gether to talk over family affairs. The 
breakfast table is their council table. 



So, I found it wise not to appear on thi 
scene too early in the morning. I ha< 
breakfast in bed." 

To early-rising Spring, this was an in 
novation. Never before had she enjoye< 
(or even longed for) such a luxury. Ye' 
every morning of that year in which sh 
shared the house with her family, Sprin, 
made it a point of never appearing down 
stairs before noon. 

The project of living together kepi 
every member of the family on theii 
toes and taught them to "keep their el 
bows in." 

"As a mother-in-law or mother, 
didn't expect to be included in every- 
thing my children did, nor did I intenJ 
to include them in all my affairs. Peri 
haps this is the mistake family member; 
make. The in-laws want to give advic* 
and want to be in on everything th* 
children do. The new sons-in-law anq 
daughters-in-law are at fault, too. Iij 
trying to maintain a happy family relation 
ship, they invite their in-laws to help, asH 
for advice. Of course, the mother-in-la\^, 
takes them seriously — she's only human 

tor. I" 1 



Today Phyllis, with Bill, eleven-year-olq 
S'An and four-year-old Chrissie, live ii 
their own home, within five-minute walk 
ing distance from Spring. The indepen 
dent family patterns established whei 
they shared one big home haven' 
changed. "We still lead our own lives,* 
Spring said. "Even though Bill is in th^ 
radio business, too, for the first time ii 
seven years Bill and I found ourselvei 
invited to the same party just the othei 
day. ..." 

"The fact that their social groups ar^ 
different (and that they are not inclinec 
to be a dropper-in type of family) doesn'^ 
in any way indicate they are not close 
"We are wonderfully close," smiles 
Spring, "because we are such good friends 



be completely happy, I think a family 

s to like each other as well as love each 
ler, don't you? 

'Perhaps the explanation (or secret) 
s in the fact that we treat each other 
th the same respect and attention we 
our friends. Just because we are 
iinlly,' we don't take each other for 
anted. To me, this is an important part 

a happy relation." 
Because Spring's many activities occupy 

much of her time, a date with any of 
e Baxleys is a thrill. "Even if Phyl and 
iris are just stopping in for coffee — as 
ey do several mornings a week — or if 
e whole gang is coming for the evening, 
s an event. Something to be cherished." 

iving a person's own Ufe, Spring feels, 

also an important lesson in learning to 

and on one's own feet, an important part 

happiness: "Something else I've always 

ied to teach my children. Today it still 

orks. If Phyl or my daughter in Santa 

arbara, Mrs. James Graham, have prob- 

•ms, they often discuss them with their 

«m friends before telling me about them. 

believe in this. Friends of their own 

ge undoubtedly will have a different — 

nd more contemporary — understanding of 

le problem than I. Of course, parents 

lould be friends, too. 

"The same applies to me. For instance, if 

feel my granddaughter should be chas- 

sed for something she's done, it's Phyl's 

usiness to look after it. Not mine. My 

usiness is to keep my business to myself." 

Spring says her grandchildren alternate 

iCtween being positive angels one minute 

nd devils the next (as all kiddies do). 

- "There's a way of handling everything," 

aughed Spring, "if you're just patient 

nough to find it." 

Patience, Spring has much of — time, very 
ittle. "Well, time to do more of the things 
love. Such as reading (my favorite hob- 
)y), letter writing, gardening. You'd be 
;urprised by the number of things I don't 
lo!" 

That list includes swimming, playing 
>ridge and the piano, plus cooking! 

"Cooking," smiled Spring, "is for those 
vho know how. The amateurs — like me — 
should leave it alone." 

Three nights a week, though, Jeannie, a 
Scotch lass whom Spring defines as a 
jositive genius, comes to the hillside house. 
Mot only does she cook a gourmet's din- 
ler, but is sure that there is enough for 
he next day, too. 

If it comes to entertaining, Spring says, 
'I take them outl" 

However, last New Year's Eve, she had 
I few close friends in to celebrate. 

"Now, dears," she said to the assembled 
;roup in the living room, "I've put maga- 
:ines and cartoon books all about the 
)lace. Entertain yourselves. Only don't 
jxpect to see me for at least a half-hour, 
.'ve got a chore or two in the kitchen." 

"You know," she now admits, "though 
'. really can't cook, I must say it worked 
leautifully. The day before, I watched 
Feannie and simply tripled the propor- 
ions and put all the things in order. You 
•eally don't appreciate order until you've 
ieen disorder alongside it in a kitchen. So 
: had no trouble at all. Simply poured and 
nixed where necessary." 

It's easy fo see that Spring really does 
lave a recipe for happiness and content- 
nent. "I think you'd have to say that 
order' is one of the ingredients," Spring 
lays. "Not all, mind you, but one. Cer- 
ainly, thinking of the rights of others is 
mother — especially with your family. 
Mustn't take them for granted. It's not fair. 
^ "As for order again, look at the heavens. 
Svery star and every planet in its place, 
^.nd lastly even the Bible says, 'Let all 
hings be done decently and in order.' " 




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85 



From Wallflower to Orchid 



{Continued from page 45) 
Kathryn, as wise as she is charming, has 
drawn these conclusions: Stars are not 
born but made; beauty is not a shell but 
the heart of a woman; the art of being 
popular and loved is not endowed by 
nature — it is something you learn and earn. 

"There are very simple, sound rules that 
transform a wallflower into an orchid," 
she says. "I know, because they have 
worked for me and, as a matter of fact, for 
Arthur, too." 

As a child, Kathryn Murray remembers 
herself as being small and homely. Rela- 
tives referred to her affectionately, but not 
considerately, as "Monkey." Her father, a 
loving but quick-witted newspaperman, 
would tell her, "Don't you care, baby, 
beauty is only skin deep . . . we'll skin 
you and you'll be just fine." 

Her favorite daydream was to be the 
epitome of female loveliness in frilly pink 
and white, admired by multitudes. Her 
mother, more realistic, dressed little Kath- 
ryn in neat, crisp linens designed to fill 
out her slight build. For all her thinness 
and what, for Kathryn, was her unat- 
tractiveness, she was a bright and ener- 
getic child. She was so clever in school 
that teachers skipped her along until her 
mother objected. Even so, Kathryn en- 
tered high school at the age of eleven. 

She was, naturally, the tiniest student in 
the school. The boys towered over her, 
and the girls seemed so much prettier. It 
hurt. It was perhaps the most crucial 
period in her life. 

Kathryn used her intelligence to observe 
and learn the secrets of popularity. When 
she graduated from high school, she was 
one of the best- liked and most sought- 
after girls in her class. A few years later, 
she met and won as a husband- Arthur 
Murray, whose profession brought him 
daily meetings with beautiful and charm- 
ing girls. Yes, Kathryn had learned quick- 
ly and well. 

"I'll tell you why I proposed to Kath- 
ryn," Arthur says. "After our first date, 
I kept thinking how much fun it would 
be to have a wife who was such good 
company." 

That was perhaps the first thing Kathryn 
had observed: The most popular girls were 
fun to be with. As a school girl, she learned 
to do things that would make her good 
company: she danced well, she played the 



ukelele, and sang. She found out what 
people her own age enjoyed talking about. 

Friends included those of her own sex. 
She never hesitated to express her admira- 
tion for another girl and, furthermore, 
never felt she was belittling herself by 
asking a potential rival for advice. From 
this teen-age beginning, Kathryn built a 
life of great success in marriage and in a 
business where personality is very im- 
portant. Today^ a mature and gracious 
woman, she has amplified and added to her 
ideas on popularity. 

"Arthur and I firmly believe a woman 
must work to remain young and attrac- 
tive," she says. "Working is growing, and 
when a flower stops growing, it withers. 
A mother, when her children are grown, 
should turn to another full-time occupa- 
tion that keeps her alert and exciting." 

She recalls a woman who came to work 
in the Arthur Murray office on the recom- 
mendation of another employee. The wom- 
an was large and dressed neatly but badly 
in a foulard dress. She looked dowdy and 
old. She was natively bright but had little 
to occupy her time. 

"She worked here three years," Kathryn 
says, "and dropped fifteen years from her 
appearance." 

Responsibility and activity animated the 
woman and gave direction to her life. 
Mingling with others, she became conscious 
of her appearance. The cheerfulness that 
permeates the studios became part of her 
outlook. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray's interest in this 
woman is the amazing thing. Their schools 
amount to a very big business with 274 
studios in the United States and Canada. 
But when this pair of tycoons talk business, 
it is usually in the terms of personalities, 
the problems of their staff and students. 

"Arthur prowls the school for shy or 
unhappy students," Kathryn tells you, "and 
then he moves in." 

Arthur's experiences as a youth were 
similar in some degree to Kathryn's. He 
was a gangling, awkward boy who felt 
hopelessly shy. So miserable was he that 
he quit high school for a time. It was 
dancing that saved him, after he had lost 
six other consecutive jobs. A neighbor 
taught him the rudiments of dancing, 
which he discovered he did well. So bash- 
ful was he, however, that he could never 
bring himself to dance with anyone he 
knew. His terrible inferiority complex 



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led him to attend, unobtrusively, stranj ^■ 
wedding parties ' where he found partne w1\ 
he had never seen before and would nev 
meet again. Luckily, dancing came ; 
naturally that he easily got a job as 
dancing instructor. His phenomenal su< 
cess from then on is a national legend. I 

But Arthur remembers his past, and h 
identification with shy youngsters cor 
tinues. The regular dancing parties h 
schools conduct is one of his answers ar. 
ways of helping the wallflower. And Y 
still personally continues his one-ma 
campaign to help backward people. 

There was Lida, a rather tall girl wit 
a hangdog expression. He found her tak 
ing lessons in the studio. He asked Lid 
(not her real name) if he might danc 
with her. Her hands were clammy an 
her teeth fairly rattled in her mouth. H 
learned that she had never attended on 
of the students' parties. On this occasioi 
Kathryn came to his assistance. 

"The girl didn't feel attractive," Kath 
ryn says. "She was nearsighted and wor 
unbecoming glasses. She was self-con 
scious about her height and tended i- 
slouch." 

Kathryn talked with the girl, told Lid; 
that her own twin daughters wore glasses 
She sent Lida to an optometrist with th( 
suggestion that she get handsome glasse: 
with blue frames to match her eyes. Sh( 
tactfully called Lida's attention to the kinc 
of attractive clothes the women teacher: 
wore. Lida took the hints. She began tc 
dress in better taste. 

"Let's face it — women have a specia 
problem," Kathryn says. "In addition tc 
ability, a woman must be able to attract 
Unlike men, women are usually in the 
position where they must wait to be asked.' 

And Lida? Well, she came to the studic 
parties. She met a young minister, mar- 
ried him, and now has a family. 

"Becoming a proficient dancer bolstered 
Lida's ego," Kathryn tells you. "Of course 
it doesn't have to be dancing. It could 
have been tennis or little-theatre work o 
anything that gave her skill and confidence 
in a group activity." 

Kathryn does not insist that dancing is 
the cure for all social ills. In analyzing 
personality problems, she has come up 
with the secrets that make a man or wom- 
an well-liked and fun to be with. But, 
she is a woman who does not preach, "Do 
as I say, not as I do." She heeds her own 
advice. Take her philosophy on work, for 
example. 

When Kathryn's daughters were grown- 
up, she went back to a full-time job in; 
her husband's studios and is a vice-presi- 
dent of the organization. She is in her' 
office from 9: 30 in the morning until six 
or as late as seven in the evening. She doesl 
that five days a week, but every morning' 
she rises between six-thirty and seven- 
thirty. In those early hours, she takes care 
of her own clothes, makes up the shopping 
list for the grocer and butcher, and does 
all the other odds and ends that fall to 
a wife. Some mornings she does some 
baking, for Arthur has a sweet-tooth. 

She doesn't often prepare dinner or 
supper, for Arthur knows that when she 
gets in a kitchen it's a problem to get her 
out. One night, for example, her publicist 
had asked her to have a party for the 
many celebrities they had taught to 
dance. The photographer, in the course 
of shooting pictures, asked Kathryn to 
please pose for some kitchen shots. He 
got the pictures but Kathryn didn't get 
back to the party for a half-hour. 

"I had cracked all of those eggs for 
the photographer," she explains, "and I 
had to make something out of them." 



Kathryn Murray gets real pleasure out 

■f doing. Added to her studio schedule is 

he weekend video show. For some pro- 

.rrams, her rehearsal may take only one 

;4ay. Other times, she may spend an entire 

■ veek polishing up a dance. But she is 

iiever harried. She, to the contrary, is 

•heerful, and that is another characteris- 

;ic of an attractive person. 

As a matter of fact, you have to be 
rheerful to get a job in the Arthur Murray 
^.tudios. Teachers are reminded that they 
ire not properly dressed unless they are 
ivearing a smile. Kathryn maintains that 
' t works as well for a woman who is single 
is one who is married and has children. 

"Poise is another virtue but one of the 
nost misunderstood words in the dic- 
ionary," Kathryn says. "It doesn't mean 
oeing a glamour puss, pointing your nose 
it the moon, making a grand entrance." 

Poise is simply being secure and re- 
; axed. A woman achieves poise when she 
orgets about her appearance. By that, 
-kathryn means do all the homework you 
ike on your face, figure and dress, but 
jnce in company, forget about rouge and 
ipstick. She notes, "Nothing makes a 
»voman look so old or ill at ease as digging 
-nto her purse in a public place. Everyone 
lets the jitters watching her pull out the 
nirror, compact, tissues, and on and on." 

Kathryn has no desire to be a "glamour 
puss" and reflects that she gets little satis- 
faction out of such flattery. She does 
really feel complimented when told, "I Uke 
to be with you. You're as comfortable as 
an old shoe." 

There are a few other rules that sum 
up what Kathryn considers a well-rounded 
person. If you want to be popular, you 
must have a sense of responsibility and 
willingly accept your share of work. You 
must be adaptable at any social gathering 
—if you learn to listen you will get along 
with anyone and be much wiser and better 
liked for it. And tact is something that 
should be employed with your family and 
close friends, as well as strangers. 

"This business of being frank is too often 
an excuse for being rude or catty," she 
says. "Tact is merely a question of being 
considerate of someone else's feelings." 

She cites the incident of a friend asking 
your opinion of a dress she is wearing. 

"So you don't like it," Kathryn says, 
'and you say, 'It's very pretty but not for 
you.' " 

That is not being tactful, for your friend 
can't run home and change the dress. 
She might even be stuck with it for 
months. You have just destroyed her 
self-confidence. 

"The point is that you wouldn't feel 
very happy if someone made that kind 
of comment to you," she says. "Tact is 
simply the Golden Rule in practical appli- 
cation." 

Kathryn is a finn practitioner of the 
Golden Rule. Her secretary doesn't work 
on Saturday when Kathryn doesn't work 
on Saturday. She doesn't make a social 
date for Arthur before consulting him, for 
Kathryn appreciates the same considera- 
tion. She doesn't interfere in the home lives 
of her married daughters, for she knows 
she wouldn't want anyone interfering in 
her private life. 

"Tact, cheerfulness, adaptability, social 
skills; all of these things make a woman 
or man attractive, and they are all things 
you have to work at," she says. "I've no- 
ticed that many homely women make the 
best wives and happiest homes. It's be- 
cause they have a physical handicap and 
work harder at making themselves at- 
tractive. There's proof for you." 

Further concrete proof is Kathryn 
Murray, herself. A glamorous granny who 
is young, vital, fascinating — and as com- 
fortable as an old shoe. 



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(Continued jrom page 71) 
discover my Prince Charming? A living, 
breathing, walking doll!" 

Jim Brooks, the doll, assigned to show 

the singer around the plant, was a test 

pilot at North American. "The perfect 

-bachelor tjpej_ ^wi know/' §^i<i Martha, 

"so he got me job!" 

This was no ordinary job to Jim Brooks. 
And it was only a few moments before 
this was obvious. Jim outdid himself, be- 
coming suddenly an eager "Textbook on 
Airplane Assembly" wired for sound! "This 
is the wing section," he said when they 
entered the big plant, "and beyond it, the 
tail assembly. Then comes the nose and 
radar, that's the ears, and finally," said 
Jim, pointing in front of them, "here are 
the fuselages." But, when he said it, his 
eyes were on Martha. 

Martha's reaction to this was, "Yes, it's 
interesting." And, she thought, "So is he!" 

As the tour came to an end, Jim said 
in a casual voice, "Oh, say, would you like 
to go to dinner?" 

Martha took a second, longer look at 
the good-looking blond Mr. Brooks, and 
before she thought, murmured, in an 
equally casual voice, "To dinner? Why, yes, 
I'd love it!" 

"I was supposed to have dinner with 
some friends," said Martha, "but I knew, if 
they were any friends of mine, they'd 
understand and forgive me. I canceled the 
date in short order, for I wasn't going to 
miss an opportunity like this— a jet- 
propelled test pilot!" 

Dinner that night led to other dinners 
and other dates. Soon Martha found her 
datebook was filled with only Jim's name. 
"See Jim at 6 P.M. Monday; Tuesday- 
Meet Jim for lunch; Wednesday— Pick up 
Jim at recording studio." It was no longer 
a datehook, but Jim's Book! 

There was one growing question in 
Martha's mind during this time when she 
and Jim were seeing one another like two 
images in a mirror. That was the question 
of her two sons' approval of Jim. 

Jerry, sixteen, and Jonathan, ten, to- 
gether with Martha, had made a compact 
little unit for all the years of their lives. 
"They were as much a part of me as 
I was of them," said Martha. "We've lived 
together for so long, that we think as much 
alike as three thieves in the market. Not 
that I was thinking of marriage, mind you, 
but I did want to know how they felt 
about my seeing Jim all the time. I usually 
went out only with business associates, 
but even here the boys always put their 
stamp of approval on my dates. Now I 
wanted to be sure they okayed my spend- 
ing so much time with Jim. 

"But the boys were way ahead of me. 
One night, I found them waiting up for 
me when I came home. 

" 'Come into the kitchen, fellas,' I in- 
vited. 'We'll have a bedtime snack. I think 
there's some turkey left.' 

"They took me right up on it. I didn't 
have to steer the conversation around to 
the question that was bothering me, either 
— for, before we even had our Dagwood 
sandwiches made, Jerry, my eldest, popped 
up with, 'That Jim's a nice guy, huh?' 

" 'I think so. Do you like him?' 

"The boys couldn't say yes fast enough! 
'I think he's swell!' agreed Jerry, who is 
sort of airplane happy himself. And Jona- 
than said stoutly, 'Me, too! I think he's 
keen. Boy, I'm gonna be a test pilot when 
D / grow up!'" 

„ As the months rolled by, Martha and 
Jim realized they were falling in love. 
"Even though we argued something fierce! 

„ I used to think we had a personality clash," 
88 H J . 



said Martha. "When we get upset, we are 
both as stubborn as mules, and as immov- 
able in our opinions as a battleship stuck 
on a sandbar. In short, we each wanted 



our own way! 

"But we learned tq compromise. That 
IS, t found 1 wasn't going {o get my way 
all the time! After a quarrel, I'd stomp 
off and wait for Jim to call. He didn't. 

"So / called Jim! The nice thing about 
those fights was the making up — and we 
never stayed angry! Fortunately, we find 
we can laugh at everything — even our- 
selves. Jim has a divine sense of humor." 

After twelve months of courtship, 
Martha came in one night and again found 
her sons waiting up for her. "Hi, Mom, 
want to have a little snack in the kitchen?" 

"They had 'conspiracy' written on their 
faces as plain as George Washington's face 
on a dollar bill. As soon as we got to 
the kitchen, the conversation got underway. 
It started off in high with Dagwood sand- 
wiches, and jumped from 'chicken goes 
good with mayonnaise' to — 'and you sure 
go good with Jim!' 

" 'Say,' said Jerry, 'are you going to 
marry him?' 

" 'Yeah,' said Jonathan, 'are you going 
to marry him?' " 

Conspiracy it was, thought Martha. 
"'Well, would you like it if I did?'" she 
asked. 

" 'Oh, boy. I'll say!' they agreed in 
unison," she laughed. 

So Martha and Jim tried to decide on 
a wedding date. "It was like trying to find 
room for another piece of cheese in one 
of those Dagwood sandwiches," said 
Martha. "There just wasn't any room for 
a wedding day in our schedules!" 

"Let's see," said Jim the next afternoon, 
when they met outside the network, "I 
have a special flight coming up this week- 
end. . . ." They both had their black date- 
books in their hands, and together they 
worried over the months and days. 

"Golly," said Martha, "that puts us way 
up into June. Say — how about a June 
wedding?" 

"That's a long way off!" said Jim. 

Finally it was agreed! When the blooms 
came put in June, they'd be married. But 
fate, which had kept them apart for a 
year, must have had conscience pangs, 
for she stepped in again! 

It was that very next weekend, at the 
last of April, that Martha found she was 
free from her busy radio schedule for a 
few days, and took off for a Palm Springs 
rest. "This was the weekend of Jim's 
special flight," said Martha, "and I in- 
tended to get some quiet! 

"I was no sooner settled, and calm as 
a clam in a cool bay, when Jim flew in. 
He literally came right out of the blue." 

"Look, my flight has been canceled," he 
said. "We've got the rest of today and all 
of tomorrow! Let's get married now! 
Enough of this nonsense!" 

"Golly," shrieked Martha, "I'm not ready 
... I mean, I've only got this sunsuit and 
one blue print dress with a sagging hem 
. . . and we haven't any place to live. . . ." 
Martha's arguments weren't getting across 
to Jim at all. He just looked at her with 
the solid determination of a set-jawed 
test pilot! 

Martha saw the square jaw. She knew 
what that meant. She'd have to com- 
promise. 

"Oh, who cares what I wear! Pack the 
bag, Liz," she called to her sister. "We're 
flying to Las Vegas!" 

And they were happily married in the 
Sands Hotel on May 3, 1953. 

"It was such a pretty wedding," said 
Martha. "Loads of flowers, carnations. 



glads and lilies! I even found time to buy 
myself a little white lace hat, which sat 
on top of my head bravely trying to ignore 
the droopy dress — I hadn't time to find an- 
other, so the hem still sagged! No matter 
what I WSg W^&fing, I couldn't have been 
happier.'' 

After the wedding, hone3mioon thoughts 
had to be postponed, since Martha was 
due back in Hollywood for the radio show 
the very next day. "It was all so fast," 
she laughed, "I felt like saying to Jim, 
'Thanks for marrying me. Now if you'll 
just drop me off at CBS — I'll see you later!' 

"But when? We still didn't have a place 
to live! Jim was in his Manhattan Beach 
apartment, and I still had to work in Hol- 
lywood every day! That meant I'd have to 
stay in the Hollywood home with my 
children and parents! 

"It was three infinite days before I was 
able to take time out and get to the beach!" 

The rest is history. 

Martha met Jim at the foot of the hill 
that led up to the apartment — their honey- 
moon cottage. "Darling . . ." said Martha. 

"Sweetheart . . ." replied Jim, and im- 
mediately kissed his bride, taking her into 
his arms and picking her up bodily — a 
maneuver adequately suited to test pilots! 
Suspended six feet in the air, Martha 
clung to Jim. They mounted the hill and 
approached — and crossed — the threshold! 

That's when it happened! 

Was it the lack of oxygen — the rarefied 
air at this hilltop altitude? Or was it a 
sudden giddy feeling on Jim's part be- 
cause of his closeness to his heart of 
hearts? 

No matter what the reason. It's just that, 
as they crossed the threshold, Jim suddenly 
tripped and weakened his grip — in fact, re- 
linquished it altogether. Martha dropped 
to the floor. 

Jim saved himself after the stumble, 
but Martha's thunip still echoed against 
the living-room walls! 

"And that's the news that hit the front 
pages," said Martha. "I was hurt in two 
places from the bouncing, but mostly it 
was my ankle. It was broken! 

"It almost killed Jim! He has taken an 
unmerciful riding from his friends. He's 
received letters and newspaper clippings 
from buddies all over the world! And the 
mean things they write on them! Well! 

"I don't have to tell you how sad it 
was for me. But we didn't realize how 
funny it was, either, until the next night 
when Jim went down to the corner drug- 
store for a pack of cigarettes. That's when 
the papers came out. There was Jim and 
there was I, big as life, but half-hidden 
by the plaster cast, staring up at him from 
the front pages of all the papers. 

"He said, upon coming home, 'It was 
very funny, you know, sort of a feeling 
that it must be happening to two other 
people!' 

"We practically said it together, 'This- 
can't-be-happening-to-us!' But it had! 
That's when we laughed! 

"So you see," said Martha, "everything 
comes to him (or her) who waits. You may 
be lonely for a time, or you may have 
held a dream for a good many years, but 
if you just work along steadily, and have 
patience, your dreams will someday come 
true. And when they do you can bet it'll 
be sudden — perhaps as sudden as a broken 
leg! 

"We're waiting and dreaming now for 
a house. In Brentwood, we hope, halfway 
between Jim's work and mine. And I 
know one thing for sure! That is, Jim's 
only going to carry himself across that 
threshold!" 



Cinderella Sis Camp 



(Continued frovi page 38) 
rang and Sis glanced at the living-room 
clock as she went to answer it. Just eight 
o'clock. She thought: If that's a call to go 
out, I'll have to refuse — too late and, be- 
sides, it's too darn cold even if. . . . 

Over the telephone she heard a voice 
that she thought she recognized — but why 
would Paul Dixon, the man whom every- 
one in Cincinnati knows, be calling her? 

"Miss Camp," the voice was saying, "my 
wife suggested I call you. I have a prob- 
lem I think you can help me with." 

"Who's — who's calling?" Sis asked, a 
little bewildered. 

"This is Paul Dixon," the voice rushed 
on. "I was wondering if you would like 
to be my Girl Friday on my television 
show." 

"Are you kidding?" Her own voice was 
half-laughing, half-shaky. 

"No," said Paul, "I have never been 
more serious in my life." 

"You mean just on your local show." 
Sis by this time had drawn up the tele- 
phone seat — she felt as if her legs just 
wouldn't hold her up another moment. 

"No, I mean on the network, too — the 
whole works," Paul's voice held a hint of 
suppressed laughter. He knew what a 
weird feeling it must be for Sis to get this 
call out of the blue. Here she was being 
offered a job she'd neither sought nor 
coveted. 

"But," Sis was protesting, "do you really 
think I can do it? Are you sure you mean 
me?" 

"I most certainly do mean you, and if 
you'll meet me at the studio in half an 
hour we'll get to work." 

"Oh, Mr. Dixon," Sis waUed, "if you 
think I can. I'll try, I'll work hard, really 
I will. I'll do everything you tell me to 
do — oh, Mr. Dixon." 

"Okay," Paul smiled into the telephone. 
"Then the first thing is to get to WCPO 
immediately and we'll begin the work." 

Sis couldn't stop talking even though 
she'd hung up the telephone. Her family 
couldn't make head nor tail of what she 
was trying to say — only her persistent urg- 
ing that she had to meet Mr. Dixon at the 
studio immediately came through. Her 
mother helped her dress, and the whole 
family breathed a sigh of relief when she 
finally drove off. 

"I hope this isn't just someone pulling 
Sis's leg," Mrs. Pohlkamp told her hus- 
band as she closed the door. 

Meanwhile, Paul was driving toward the 
studio on the other side of town. Doubts 
began to assail him. He'd only seen Sis 
twice before in his life, and actually it 
was Marge, his wife, who had observed 
more about Sis than he had. He knew that 
Sis had worked at WCPO a few years 
before, but she had done nothing like 
what she'd have to do on his show. 

When Paul arrived at the studio, Sis was 
already there. He put on the records 
which would be used on the next day's 
show. Sis would have to pantomime, co- 
ordinating the movements of her mouth 
and body to the words and music on the 
records. It had to be perfection, else the 
illusion would be lost — and both a show 
and a girl's chances for success spoiled. 

"Hour after hour we worked," Paul de- 
scribed the session later. "Sis went over 
and over again the pantomiming of the 
recordings. It was four o'clock in the 



October RADiO-TV MIRROR 
On sale September 9 



morning when I finally called a halt. She 
wanted to continue, because she said she 
wanted to be perfect on her first show. I 
was afraid we'd grow completely stale if 
we went on any longer, so I promised we'd 
meet at ten the next morning for three 
more hours' rehearsal before the local 
show went on the air. 

"The next morning I arrived completely 
worn out. Sis, bright as a daisy, was al- 
ready in the studio working on the records. 
The three hours evaporated — as time is 
wont to do when you need every second 
you can get — and the signal came for the 
director. We were on the air. 

"All of us connected with the show 
held our breaths. Then Sis walked on- 
camera, poised and with the charm of a 
veteran trouper. Her first number was 
perfection. 

"From that moment. Sis was 'in.' Len 
Goorian, our producer, hugged her. Al 
Sternberg, our director, was doing nip- 
ups in the control booth. And Wanda 
Lewis, the artist on our show, put her 
arms around Sis and gavp her a big hug." 

Since then, Wanda and Sis have become 
the best of friends. "Wanda's like the 
sister I always wished I had," Sis tells 
everyone. "Certainly, I've never had a 
better friend." 

Sis Camp, the modern-day Cinderella, 
was born Loraine Pohlkamp in St. Ber- 
nard, Ohio, a little suburb completely sur- 
rounded by the city of Cincinnati. She's 
the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Pohlkamp — a daughter who had the usual 
dreams of being an actress but didn't do 
anything much to make them come true. 
Closest she'd ever come to show business 
was some high-school modeling and a bit 
of chatter on a record show over WCPO. 
No years of singing instruction, no years 
of dancing school, no years of dramatic 
productions. 

Sis is exactly what she appears to be on 
the Paul Dixon Show over DuMont. She's 
a family girl. After being graduated from 
Our Lady of Cincinnati CoDege, where she 
majored in sociology. Sis took up model- 
ing full time and became a fashion coor- 
dinator for a local department store in 
Cincinnati. She was employed in the de- 
partment store when the call came through 
from Paul Dixon that changed her life. 

Sis lives at home with her parents and 
three brothers, in the same house in which 
she was born. She can cook up a fine meal 
all by herself, and often does, to give her 
mother a little rest over the weekends. 
Actually, Sis was pursuing her hobby — 
sewing — when Paul "phoned her that cold 
November night. She has made many of 
her own clothes and often turns out a 
skirt or formal for Paul's show, when she 
has time. 

Sis is still "Sis" to her three brothers, 
who tease her as unmercifully as they did 
when she was a youngster trying to com- 
pete with them in baseball or football. 
However, her oldest brother Joe, who is 
now in business for himself, doesn't mind 
boasting to his business acquaintances that 
it's his "Sis" on TV. And her father, a 
foreman at Procter and Gamble, is apt to 
carry around a few anecdotes about the 
"behind the scenes" life on the Dixon 
show. Brothers Dick and Jack, still in 
school, have a way of casually having 
friends drop by the house at Sis's re- 
hearsal time. Sis takes it all good- 
naturedly, for it's all part of being the 
"Cinderella girl of TV." 

The clock may have struck at midnight 
for the Cinderella of that classic fairy 
tale, but for Sis it struck at eight one eve- 
ning with the resoTonding ring of a modern 
telephone. 



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Rosemary 



90 



{Continued from page 74) 
"I gotta hand you one for trying, 
though," Blondie said. "I never heard you 
he so good before. About how she'll be glad 
to see him." 

"Do you think he believed it?" 
Blondie shrugged. "He wants to, so he 
does — halfway, anyhow. But if I were 
you and Bill, Rosemary, when he comes 
back here tonight for dinner, I'd talk to 
him like a Dutch uncle. Give it to him 
straight. After all, it was he who gave the 
kid away to ypur folks when Jessie was 
little. Not legally, maybe, but settling with 
your folks to bring her up here in Spring- 
dale like she was their own. Now he 
wants to go back on a bargain, and he's 
too late. Jessie'll never love him like a 
real pop." 

Maybe, I mused. Jessie had become part 
of my family, the Cotter family. Yet al- 
ways on the fringe of her life was Lefty, a 
sort of silent threat that might destroy her 
security. Lefty meant no such threat. The 
last thing he wanted was to cause her the 
slightest unhappiness. But, now that she 
was growing up, he longed more and more 
for the happiness he'd had to give away. 
He'd glowed with delight when I told him 
Jessie had captured the hero of the sopho- 
more class, young Bim Evans, and that he 
was taking her to a formal school dance the 
coming weekend. All he wanted was a 
tiny bystander's share in happy things 
like that. The pity of it was that things 
were so di